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Command String Argument Types

Last Updated: 9/16/2016

When you include arguments in command strings, you must specify each argument's type. Each argument type specification is a single letter, preceded by a percent sign.

The following table lists all the argument type specifiers.

Argument Type SpecifierDescription of resulting value

%<Digits>d

ASCII string representing a decimal value, including a minus sign if negative. <Digits> is an optional number indicating the string length.

%<Digits>D

ASCII string representing decimal value, including a plus or minus sign. <Digits> is an optional number indicating the string length.

%c

Binary byte.

%C

Binary byte added to ASCII "0".

%f

Unsigned ASCII string representing a decimal value, with a decimal point inserted as the third character from the right, as in "12.25".

%g

2 * ABS(Parameter) + IS_NEGATIVE(Parameter) as a base-64 number, least significant digit to most significant digit. The most significant digit (0-63) is represented by bytes 191 through 254. All other digits are represented by bytes 63 through 126. "IS_NEGATIVE(Parameter)" is 1 if Parameter is negative, and zero otherwise.

%l

Binary word, least significant byte first.

%m

Binary word, most significant byte first.

%n

Canon integer encoding. Binary value encoded from most significant byte to least significant byte. The 4 least significant bits are encoded as 001sbbbb, where s represents the sign (0 is negative, 1 is positive), and b represents a significant bit of the integer. The next most significant 6 bits are encoded as 01bbbbbb. For example, 254 (11111110) is represented as (01001111 00111110).

%q

ASCII string representing a QUME hexadecimal number. For Toshiba/Qume devices.

%v

NEC VFU (Vertical Format Unit) encoding. The specified variable's value is divided by 1/6 inch. The result is the number of times VFU data is sent to the printer.

You can specify a range of acceptable values for any argument. To do so, include the argument's minimum and maximum values by placing them inside a set of square brackets ( [, ] ), immediately following the argument type specifier, and separating the values by a comma. For example, the following command specifies 0 through 255 as an acceptable range for the value of LinefeedSpacing/2:

*Command:CmdSetLineSpacing{*Cmd:"<1B>3"%c[0,255]{(LinefeedSpacing/2)}}

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