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Select-Xml

JuanPablo Jofre|Last Updated: 11/17/2016
|
2 Contributors

SYNOPSIS

Finds text in an XML string or document.

SYNTAX

Xml (Default)

Select-Xml [-Xml] <XmlNode[]> [-XPath] <String> [-Namespace <Hashtable>] [<CommonParameters>]

Path

Select-Xml [-Path] <String[]> [-XPath] <String> [-Namespace <Hashtable>] [<CommonParameters>]

LiteralPath

Select-Xml -LiteralPath <String[]> [-XPath] <String> [-Namespace <Hashtable>] [<CommonParameters>]

Content

Select-Xml -Content <String[]> [-XPath] <String> [-Namespace <Hashtable>] [<CommonParameters>]

DESCRIPTION

The Select-Xml cmdlet lets you use XPath queries to search for text in XML strings and documents. Enter an XPath query, and use the Content, Path, or Xml parameter to specify the XML to be searched.

EXAMPLES

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 1 --------------------------

PS C:\> $Path = "$pshome\Types.ps1xml"
PS C:\>$XPath = "/Types/Type/Members/AliasProperty"
PS C:\>Select-Xml -Path $path -XPath $xpath | Select-Object -ExpandProperty Node
Name                 ReferencedMemberName
----                 --------------------
Count                Length
Name                 Key
Name                 ServiceName
RequiredServices     ServicesDependedOn
ProcessName          Name
Handles              Handlecount
VM                   VirtualSize
WS                   WorkingSetSize
Name                 ProcessName
Handles              Handlecount
VM                   VirtualMemorySize
WS                   WorkingSet
PM                   PagedMemorySize
NPM                  NonpagedSystemMemorySize
Name                 __Class
Namespace            ModuleName

This example gets the alias properties in the Types.ps1xml. (For information about this file, see about_Types.ps1xml.)

The first command saves the path to the Types.ps1xml file in the $Path variable.

The second command saves the XML path to the AliasProperty node in the $XPath variable.

The third command uses the Select-Xml cmdlet to get the AliasProperty nodes that are identified by the XPath statement from the Types.ps1xml file. The command uses a pipeline operator to send the AliasProperty nodes to the Select-Object cmdlet. The ExpandProperty parameter expands the Node object and returns its Name and ReferencedMemberName properties.

The result shows the Name and ReferencedMemberName of each alias property in the Types.ps1xml file. For example, there is a Count property that is an alias of the Length property.

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 2 --------------------------

PS C:\>[xml]$Types = Get-Content $pshome\Types.ps1xml
PS C:\>Select-Xml -Xml $Types -XPath "//MethodName"

This example shows how to use the XML parameter to provide an XML document to the Select-Xml cmdlet.

The first command uses the Get-Content cmdlet to get the content of the Types.ps1xml file and save it in the $Types variable. The "[xml]" casts the variable as an XML object.

The second command uses the Select-Xml cmdlet to get the MethodName nodes in the Types.ps1xml file. The command uses the Xml parameter to specify the XML content in the $Types variable and the XPath parameter to specify the path to the MethodName node.

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 3 --------------------------

The first command creates a hash table that represents the XML namespace that is used for the help files and saves it in the $Namespace variable.
PS C:\>$Namespace = @{command="http://schemas.microsoft.com/maml/dev/command/2004/10"; maml="http://schemas.microsoft.com/maml/2004/10"; dev="http://schemas.microsoft.com/maml/dev/2004/10"}

The second command saves the path to the help files in the $Path variable.If there are no help files in this path on your computer, use the Update-Help cmdlet to download the help files. For more information about Updatable Help, see about_Updatable_Help ( http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=235801).
PS C:\>$Path = "$pshome\en-us\*dll-Help.xml"

The third command uses the **Select-Xml** cmdlet to search the XML for cmdlet names by finding Command:Name element anywhere in the files. It saves the results in the $xml variable.**Select-Xml** returns a **SelectXmlInfo** object that has a **Node** property, which is a **System.Xml.XmlElement** object. The **Node** property has an **InnerXML** property, which contains the actual XML that is retrieved.
PS C:\>$Xml = Select-Xml -Path $Path -Namespace $Namespace -XPath "//command:name"

The fourth command sends the XML in the $Xml variable to the Format-Table cmdlet. The **Format-Table** command uses a calculated property to get the Node.InnerXML property of each object in the $Xml variable, trim the white space before and after the text, and display it in the table, along with the path to the source file.
PS C:\>$Xml | Format-Table @{Label="Name"; Expression= {($_.node.innerxml).trim()}}, Path -AutoSize

Name                    Path
----                    ----
Export-Counter          C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Diagnostics.dll-Help.xml
Get-Counter             C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Diagnostics.dll-Help.xml
Get-WinEvent            C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Diagnostics.dll-Help.xml
Import-Counter          C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Diagnostics.dll-Help.xml
Add-Computer            C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Management.dll-Help.xml
Add-Content             C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Management.dll-Help.xml
Checkpoint-Computer     C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\en-us\Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Management.dll-Help.xml
...

This example shows how to use the Select-Xml cmdlet to search the Windows PowerShell XML-based cmdlet help files. In this example, we'll search for the cmdlet name that serves as a title for each help file and the path to the help file.

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 4 --------------------------

The first command saves a here-string that contains XML in the $xml variable. (For more information about here-strings, see about_Quoting_Rules.)
PS C:\>$xml = @"
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Book>
  <projects>
    <project name="Book1" date="2009-01-20">
      <editions>
        <edition language="English">En.Book1.com</edition>
        <edition language="German">Ge.Book1.Com</edition>
        <edition language="French">Fr.Book1.com</edition>
        <edition language="Polish">Pl.Book1.com</edition>
      </editions>
    </project>
  </projects>
</Book>
"@

The second command uses the **Content** parameter  of **Select-Xml** to specify the XML in the $xml variable.
PS C:\>Select-Xml -Content $xml -XPath "//edition" | foreach {$_.node.InnerXML}

En.Book1.com
Ge.Book1.Com
Fr.Book1.com
Pl.Book1.com

The third command is equivalent to the second. It uses a pipeline operator (|) to send the XML in the $xml variable to the Select-Xml cmdlet.
PS C:\>$xml | Select-Xml -XPath "//edition" | foreach {$_.node.InnerXML}

En.Book1.com
Ge.Book1.Com
Fr.Book1.com
Pl.Book1.com

This example shows two different ways to send XML to the Select-Xml cmdlet.

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 5 --------------------------

The first command creates a hash table for the default namespace the that snippet XML files use and assigns it to the $SnippetNamespace variable. The hash table value is the XMLNS schema URI in the snippet XML. The hash table key name, "snip," is arbitrary. You can use any name that is not reserved, but you cannot use "xmlns."
PS C:\>$SnippetNamespace = @{snip="http://schemas.microsoft.com/PowerShell/Snippets"}

The second command uses the **Select-Xml** cmdlet to get the content of the Title element of each snippet. It uses the **Path** parameter to specify the Snippets directory and the **Namespace** parameter to specify the namespace in the $SnippetNamespace variable. The value of  the **XPath** parameter is the "snip" namespace key, a colon (:), and the name of the Title element.The command uses a pipeline operator (|) to send each **Node** property that **Select-Xml** returns to the ForEach-Object cmdlet, which gets the title in the value of the **InnerXml** property of the node.
PS C:\>Select-Xml -Path $home\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Snippets -Namespace $SnippetNamespace -XPath "//snip:Title" | foreach {$_.Node.Innerxml}

This example shows how to use the Select-Xml cmdlet with XML documents that use the default "xmlns" namespace. The example gets the titles of Windows PowerShell ISE user-created snippet files. For information about snippets, see New-IseSnippet.

PARAMETERS

-Content

Specifies a string that contains the XML to search. You can also pipe strings to Select-Xml.

Type: String[]
Parameter Sets: Content
Aliases: 

Required: True
Position: Named
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: True (ByValue)
Accept wildcard characters: False

-Namespace

Specifies a hash table of the namespaces used in the XML. Use the format @{<namespaceName> = <namespaceValue>}.

When the XML uses the default namespace, which begins with "xmlns", use an arbitrary key for the namespace name. You cannot use "xmlns". In the XPath statement, prefix each node name with the namespace name and a colon, such as "//namespaceName:Node".

Type: Hashtable
Parameter Sets: (All)
Aliases: 

Required: False
Position: Named
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: False
Accept wildcard characters: False

-Path

Specifies the path and file names of the XML files to search. Wildcards are permitted.

Type: String[]
Parameter Sets: Path
Aliases: 

Required: True
Position: 2
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters: True

-XPath

Specifies an XPath search query. The query language is case-sensitive. This parameter is required.

Type: String
Parameter Sets: (All)
Aliases: 

Required: True
Position: 1
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: False
Accept wildcard characters: False

-Xml

Specifies one or more XML nodes.

An XML document will be processed as a collection of XML nodes. If you pipe an XML document to Select-Xml, each document node will be searched separately as it comes through the pipeline.

Type: XmlNode[]
Parameter Sets: Xml
Aliases: Node

Required: True
Position: 2
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: True (ByPropertyName, ByValue)
Accept wildcard characters: False

-LiteralPath

Specifies the paths and file names of the XML files to search. Unlike Path, the value of the LiteralPath parameter is used exactly as it is typed. No characters are interpreted as wildcards. If the path includes escape characters, enclose it in single quotation marks. Single quotation marks tell Windows PowerShell not to interpret any characters as escape sequences.

Type: String[]
Parameter Sets: LiteralPath
Aliases: PSPath

Required: True
Position: Named
Default value: None
Accept pipeline input: True (ByPropertyName)
Accept wildcard characters: False

CommonParameters

This cmdlet supports the common parameters: -Debug, -ErrorAction, -ErrorVariable, -InformationAction, -InformationVariable, -OutVariable, -OutBuffer, -PipelineVariable, -Verbose, -WarningAction, and -WarningVariable. For more information, see about_CommonParameters (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=113216).

INPUTS

System.String or System.Xml.XmlNode

You can pipe a path or XML node to Select-Xml.

OUTPUTS

Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.SelectXmlInfo

NOTES

*

ConvertTo-Xml

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