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DateTime.AddHours Method (Double)

 

Returns a new DateTime that adds the specified number of hours to the value of this instance.

Namespace:   System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public DateTime AddHours(
	double value
)

Parameters

value
Type: System.Double

A number of whole and fractional hours. The value parameter can be negative or positive.

Return Value

Type: System.DateTime

An object whose value is the sum of the date and time represented by this instance and the number of hours represented by value.

Exception Condition
ArgumentOutOfRangeException

The resulting DateTime is less than MinValue or greater than MaxValue.

This method does not change the value of this DateTime. Instead, it returns a new DateTime whose value is the result of this operation. The Kind property of the returned DateTime object is the same as that of value.

The fractional part of value is the fractional part of an hour. For example, 4.5 is equivalent to 4 hours, 30 minutes, 0 seconds, 0 milliseconds, and 0 ticks.

The value parameter is rounded to the nearest millisecond.

Converting time intervals of less than an hour to a fraction can involve a loss of precision if the result is a non-terminating repeating decimal. (For example, one minute is 0.016667 of an hour.) If this is problematic, you can use the Add method, which enables you to specify more than one kind of time interval in a single method call and eliminates the need to convert time intervals to fractional parts of an hour.

The following example uses the AddHours method to add a number of whole and fractional values to a date and time. It also illustrates the loss of precision caused by passing the method a value that includes a fractional component.

using System;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      double[] hours = {.08333, .16667, .25, .33333, .5, .66667, 1, 2, 
                        29, 30, 31, 90, 365};
      DateTime dateValue = new DateTime(2009, 3, 1, 12, 0, 0);

      foreach (double hour in hours)
         Console.WriteLine("{0} + {1} hour(s) = {2}", dateValue, hour, 
                           dateValue.AddHours(hour));

   }
}
// The example displays the following output on a system whose current
// culture is en-US:
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.08333 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:04:59 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.16667 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:10:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.25 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:15:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.33333 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:19:59 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.5 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:30:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 0.66667 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 12:40:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 1 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 1:00:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 2 hour(s) = 3/1/2009 2:00:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 29 hour(s) = 3/2/2009 5:00:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 30 hour(s) = 3/2/2009 6:00:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 31 hour(s) = 3/2/2009 7:00:00 PM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 90 hour(s) = 3/5/2009 6:00:00 AM
//    3/1/2009 12:00:00 PM + 365 hour(s) = 3/16/2009 5:00:00 PM

Universal Windows Platform
Available since 8
.NET Framework
Available since 1.1
Portable Class Library
Supported in: portable .NET platforms
Silverlight
Available since 2.0
Windows Phone Silverlight
Available since 7.0
Windows Phone
Available since 8.1
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