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Directory.EnumerateFiles Method (String)

Returns an enumerable collection of file names in a specified path.

Namespace:  System.IO
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public static IEnumerable<string> EnumerateFiles(
	string path
)

Parameters

path
Type: System.String

The relative or absolute path to the directory to search. This string is not case-sensitive.

Return Value

Type: System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<String>
An enumerable collection of the full names (including paths) for the files in the directory specified by path.

ExceptionCondition
ArgumentException

path is a zero-length string, contains only white space, or contains invalid characters. You can query for invalid characters by using the GetInvalidPathChars method.

ArgumentNullException

path is null.

DirectoryNotFoundException

path is invalid, such as referring to an unmapped drive.

IOException

path is a file name.

PathTooLongException

The specified path, file name, or combined exceed the system-defined maximum length. For example, on Windows-based platforms, paths must be less than 248 characters and file names must be less than 260 characters.

SecurityException

The caller does not have the required permission.

UnauthorizedAccessException

The caller does not have the required permission.

You can specify relative path information with the path parameter. Relative path information is interpreted as relative to the current working directory, which you can determine by using the GetCurrentDirectory method.

The EnumerateFiles and GetFiles methods differ as follows: When you use EnumerateFiles, you can start enumerating the collection of names before the whole collection is returned; when you use GetFiles, you must wait for the whole array of names to be returned before you can access the array. Therefore, when you are working with many files and directories, EnumerateFiles can be more efficient.

The returned collection is not cached; each call to the GetEnumerator on the collection will start a new enumeration.

The following example shows how to retrieve all the files in a directory and move them to a new directory. After the files are moved, they no longer exist in the original directory.

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string sourceDirectory = @"C:\current";
            string archiveDirectory = @"C:\archive";

            try
            {
                var txtFiles = Directory.EnumerateFiles(sourceDirectory);

                foreach (string currentFile in txtFiles)
                {
                    string fileName = currentFile.Substring(sourceDirectory.Length + 1);
                    Directory.Move(currentFile, Path.Combine(archiveDirectory, fileName));
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
            }
        }
    }
}

The following example enumerates the files in the specified directory, reads each line of the file, and displays the line if it contains the string "Europe".

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.IO;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            // LINQ query for all files containing the word 'Europe'. 
            var files = from file in 
                Directory.EnumerateFiles(@"\\archives1\library\")
                where file.ToLower().Contains("europe")
                select file;

            foreach (var file in files)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", file);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("{0} files found.", files.Count<string>().ToString());
        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException UAEx)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(UAEx.Message);
        }
        catch (PathTooLongException PathEx)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(PathEx.Message);
        }
    }
}

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.6, 4.5, 4

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4
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