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Object.GetType Method ()

 

Gets the Type of the current instance.

Namespace:   System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public Type GetType()

Return Value

Type: System.Type

The exact runtime type of the current instance.

Because System.Object is the base class for all types in the .NET Framework type system, the GetType method can be used to return Type objects that represent all .NET Framework types. The .NET Framework recognizes the following five categories of types:

For two objects x and y that have identical runtime types, Object.ReferenceEquals(x.GetType(),y.GetType()) returns true. The following example uses the GetType method with the ReferenceEquals method to determine whether one numeric value is the same type as two other numeric values.

int n1 = 12;
int n2 = 82;
long n3 = 12;

Console.WriteLine("n1 and n2 are the same type: {0}",
                  Object.ReferenceEquals(n1.GetType(), n2.GetType()));
Console.WriteLine("n1 and n3 are the same type: {0}",
                  Object.ReferenceEquals(n1.GetType(), n3.GetType()));
// The example displays the following output:
//       n1 and n2 are the same type: True
//       n1 and n3 are the same type: False      
System_CAPS_noteNote

To determine whether an object is a specific type, you can use your language's type comparison keyword or construct. For example, you can use the TypeOf…Is construct in Visual Basic or the is keyword in C#.

The GetType method is inherited by all types that derive from Object. This means that, in addition to using your own language's comparison keyword, you can use the GetType method to determine the type of a particular object, as the following example shows.

using System;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      object[] values = { (int) 12, (long) 10653, (byte) 12, (sbyte) -5,
                         16.3, "string" }; 
      foreach (var value in values) {
         Type t = value.GetType();
         if (t.Equals(typeof(byte)))
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is an unsigned byte.", value);
         else if (t.Equals(typeof(sbyte)))
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a signed byte.", value);
         else if (t.Equals(typeof(int)))   
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a 32-bit integer.", value);
         else if (t.Equals(typeof(long)))   
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a 32-bit integer.", value);
         else if (t.Equals(typeof(double)))
            Console.WriteLine("{0} is a double-precision floating point.", 
                              value);
         else
            Console.WriteLine("'{0}' is another data type.", value);
      }
   }
}
// The example displays the following output:
//    12 is a 32-bit integer.
//    10653 is a 32-bit integer.
//    12 is an unsigned byte.
//    -5 is a signed byte.
//    16.3 is a double-precision floating point.
//    'string' is another data type.

The Type object exposes the metadata associated with the class of the current Object.

The following code example demonstrates that GetType returns the runtime type of the current instance.

using System;

public class MyBaseClass {
}

public class MyDerivedClass: MyBaseClass {
}

public class Test 
{
   public static void Main() 
   {
      MyBaseClass myBase = new MyBaseClass();
      MyDerivedClass myDerived = new MyDerivedClass();
      object o = myDerived;
      MyBaseClass b = myDerived;

      Console.WriteLine("mybase: Type is {0}", myBase.GetType());
      Console.WriteLine("myDerived: Type is {0}", myDerived.GetType());
      Console.WriteLine("object o = myDerived: Type is {0}", o.GetType());
      Console.WriteLine("MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is {0}", b.GetType());
   }
}
// The example displays the following output:
//    mybase: Type is MyBaseClass
//    myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass
//    object o = myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass
//    MyBaseClass b = myDerived: Type is MyDerivedClass 

Universal Windows Platform
Available since 8
.NET Framework
Available since 1.1
Portable Class Library
Supported in: portable .NET platforms
Silverlight
Available since 2.0
Windows Phone Silverlight
Available since 7.0
Windows Phone
Available since 8.1
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