Deleting a System-Allocated Timer Object

Starting with Windows 8.1, the ExDeleteTimer routine deletes a timer object that was created by the ExAllocateTimer routine. This timer object is a system-allocated EX_TIMER structure whose members are opaque to drivers. Before a timer object is deleted, ExDeleteTimer disables further timer operations on the object, and cancels or completes any pending operation on the object that might be in progress.

After a driver calls ExDeleteTimer, this routine takes several steps to ensure that it can safely delete the timer object. First, ExDeleteTimer marks the timer object as disabled to prevent the driver from starting a new timer operation that uses the object. After the timer object is disabled, a call to the ExSetTimer or ExCancelTimer routine immediately returns FALSE and performs no operation. Also, a second call to ExDeleteTimer returns FALSE and performs no operation.

Next, ExDeleteTimer checks whether a timer is still pending from a previous call to ExDeleteTimer. Disabling a timer object does not cancel a timer that was set before the object was disabled. In either of the following two cases, a timer that was previously set might expire after the timer object is disabled:

  • The timer is periodic.
  • The timer is one-shot (or nonperiodic) and has not yet expired.

A periodic timer can never expire more than once after the timer object is disabled.

If your driver implements an ExTimerCallback callback routine, the Timer parameter to this routine is guaranteed to always be a valid pointer to the timer object (an EX_TIMER structure), even if the timer expires after the timer object is disabled.

If no timer is pending, ExDeleteTimer deletes the timer object and returns without waiting.

If a timer is pending when ExDeleteTimer is called, the Cancel and Wait parameter values that your driver supplies to this routine control the routine's behavior. The Cancel parameter tells ExDeleteTimer whether to try to cancel a pending timer. The Wait parameter tells ExDeleteTimer whether to wait to return until the timer object is deleted.

If Cancel is FALSE (in which case, Wait must be FALSE) and a timer is pending, ExDeleteTimer lets the timer expire before the timer object is deleted. In this case, ExDeleteTimer marks the timer object to indicate that it is to be deleted after the pending timer expires (and any last callback to the ExTimerCallback routine finishes). Then ExDeleteTimer returns without waiting either for the timer to finish expiring or for the object to be deleted.

If Cancel is TRUE, ExDeleteTimer tries to cancel a pending timer before it expires. ExDeleteTimer returns TRUE if it successfully cancels the timer. ExDeleteTimer returns FALSE if it cannot cancel the timer, which is the case for a one-shot timer that has already expired or is in the process of expiring. ExDeleteTimer also returns FALSE if the (one-shot or periodic) timer was canceled before the ExDeleteTimer call or if the timer was never set.

If Cancel is TRUE and Wait is FALSE, ExDeleteTimer never blocks the calling thread. If the timer object cannot be immediately deleted, ExDeleteTimer marks the timer object to indicate that it is to be deleted after the pending timer finishes expiring, and returns immediately without waiting either for the timer to expire or for the object to be deleted.

If Cancel and Wait are both TRUE, ExDeleteTimer blocks the calling thread if the timer object cannot be immediately deleted. ExDeleteTimer waits, if necessary, for the timer to finish expiring and for any callback to a driver-implemented ExTimerCallback routine to finish. Next, ExDeleteTimer deletes the timer object and calls the ExTimerDeleteCallback routine, if the driver implements this routine. Finally, ExDeleteTimer returns.

A driver can call ExDeleteTimer from the driver's ExTimerCallback routine, which runs at IRQL = DISPATCH_LEVEL, but the driver must set the Wait parameter in this call to FALSE.

As an option, a driver can implement an ExTimerDeleteCallback callback routine that runs after a timer object is deleted. Typically, an ExTimerDeleteCallback routine frees any system resources that the driver allocated to use with the timer object.

ExDeleteTimer schedules a driver-implemented ExTimerDeleteCallback routine to run after the timer object is deleted, at which time the pointer to this object is no longer valid. If the Wait parameter is TRUE in the ExDeleteTimer call, the callback to the ExTimerDeleteCallback routine finishes before ExDeleteTimer returns. If Wait is FALSE, the ExTimerDeleteCallback routine might run before or after ExDeleteTimer returns.

For more information, see ExXxxTimer Routines and EX_TIMER Objects.

 

 

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