MSDN Magazine: Windows XP rss

All MSDN Magazine Topics
  • Mobility: Make Your WPF Apps Power-Aware
    Andre Michaud - July 2007
    Here Andre Michaud shows you how to use power notifications to make your applications power aware.

  • C++ Q&A: Typename, Disabling Keys in Windows XP with TrapKeys
    Paul DiLascia - September 2002


  • Windows XP: Escape from DLL Hell with Custom Debugging and Instrumentation Tools and Utilities, Part 2
    Christophe Nasarre - August 2002
    Building on his article published in the June issue, which demonstrated several ways to get process and DLL-related information from APIs such as PSAPI, NTDLL, and TOOLHELP32, the author presents some unusual ways to get system-oriented info that you can easily integrate in your own toolkit. There are three tools included as samples: LoadLibrarySpy, which monitors an application and detects which DLLs are really loaded; WindowDump, which retrieves the content and a detailed description of any window; and FileUsage, which redirects console-mode applications to tell you which process is using any opened file.

  • DirectShow: Core Media Technology in Windows XP Empowers You to Create Custom Audio/Video Processing Components
    Michael Blome and Mike Wasson - July 2002
    DirectShow is an API that enables Windows applications to control a wide variety of audio/video input devices including (but not limited to) DV camcorders, Web cams, DVD drives, and TV tuner cards. It provides out-of-the-box support for a variety of formats, from WAV and AVI to Windows Media. DirectShow is also extensible, enabling third parties to support their own specialized devices, formats, or processing components. This article introduces the basic concepts behind DirectShow and gives a step-by-step tutorial showing how to create your own video effect filter.

  • .NET Zero Deployment: Security and Versioning Models in the Windows Forms Engine Help You Create and Deploy Smart Clients
    Chris Sells - July 2002
    Windows Forms applications solve many of the problems inherent in building Web applications the old fashioned way?with HTML. To demonstrate the use of Windows Forms over the Web, the author takes his existing app, Wahoo!, and ports it to Windows Forms. In doing so, he discusses versioning, linked files, security, storage isolation, the deployment model, and everything else you need to get started building your own Windows Forms apps for the Web.

  • Windows XP: Escape from DLL Hell with Custom Debugging and Instrumentation Tools and Utilities
    Christophe Nasarre - June 2002
    DLL conflict problems can be tough to solve, but a large number of tools are available to help. There are also many Windows APIs that you can use to build custom debugging tools. Three such tools are discussed here and provided as samples. DllSpy lists all the DLLs loaded in the system and the processes that are using them. ProcessSpy enumerates the running processes and exposes the DLLs they are using, and ProcessXP displays the list of concurrent running sessions for Windows XP.

  • Scripting: Windows Script Host 5.6 Boasts Windows XP Integration, Security, New Object Model
    Dino Esposito - May 2002
    Windows Script Host (WSH) 5.6, a major upgrade for the WSH environment, provides some significant improvements over previous versions. A brand new security model that is tightly integrated with security in Windows XP allows administrators to place fine-grained restrictions on scripts reducing the risk from malicious code. In addition, local scripts can now run on remote machines, and enhancements to the object model reduce the amount of boilerplate code needed when writing professional code. This overview of WSH 5.6 explains these changes and how .NET and scripting work together.

  • COM+ 1.5: Discover Powerful Low-Level Programming in Windows XP with New COM+ APIs
    Craig Andera and Tim Ewald - April 2002
    The new version of COM+ that ships as part of Windows XP includes APIs for low-level context programming. These functions allow you to create contexts that use COM+ runtime services, independent of objects and without registering anything in the COM+ Catalog. Designed for advanced COM+ developers who understand the COM+ context model, these APIs make it easy to integrate runtime services with code in nonstandard ways. This article explains how these low-level context APIs work, discusses when you'd want to use them, and provides a .NET-based wrapper to make it simpler to use the APIs from C#.

  • Office XP: Build a Custom DLL to Expose Your Objects and Services Through Smart Tag Technology
    Paul Sanna - January 2002
    Smart Tags is a new technology delivered with Office XP that makes it easy for users to complete common tasks on familiar and relevant data regardless of the application they are using. Microsoft provides tools to make it easy to roll out simple Smart Tag applications using XML as a backbone. The Smart Tag SDK provides the detail needed to build a COM automation server for Smart Tags in Visual Basic or Visual C++. This article brings the reader through the SDK to outline the process of building a Smart Tag DLL using the tag recognizer and the action provider to create customized user experiences.

  • Windows XP: Kernel Improvements Create a More Robust, Powerful, and Scalable OS
    Mark Russinovich and David Solomon - December 2001
    The Windows XP kernel includes a number of improvements over Windows 2000 that promote better scalability and overall performance. This article covers these changes and explains how they improve startup time, increase registry size limits, and promote more efficient disk partitioning. Windows XP provides support for 64-bit processors, which is covered here along with a discussion of how side-by-side assemblies end DLL Hell. Also new in the Windows XP kernel is a facility that will roll back driver installations to the Last Known Good state of the registry, making driver installation safer. Other topics include the new volume shadow copy facility, which provides for more accurate backups and improvements in remote debugging.

  • Editor's Note: Windows XP is Here, Again!
    - December 2001


  • Windows XP Overview: Take Advantage of New Windows XP Features in Your Apps Today
    Douglas Boling - November 2001
    Windows XP includes both improvements to the operating system and several new features that enhance the user experience. The most noticeable change in Windows XP is the user interface, which includes a revised Start menu and updated Task Bar. The new look is possible because Windows XP can be skinned, which lets the interface be changed dramatically with a new facility called themes. Windows XP also introduces fast user switching, which allows multiple users to be logged onto their own sessions at the same time on the same machine and, as the name implies, they can switch back and forth quickly. Another new feature, ClearType, is discussed here as well.

  • New Graphical Interface: Enhance Your Programs with New Windows XP Shell Features
    Dino Esposito - November 2001
    The Windows XP shell introduces many new features that both users and developers are sure to welcome. The interface supports a number of styles that will be new to users, and it also supports customization of those styles through a new concept called themes. There are more shell registry settings available to the user and developer, a facility for customizing infotips, and infotip shell extensions. In addition, folder views can be customized. This article covers these shell changes and includes a discussion of a number of other Windows XP additions. These include fast user switching, which lets users log on and off quickly, and AutoPlay support for a variety of devices and file types not previously supported.

  • Beyond Windows XP: Get Ready Now for the Upcoming 64-Bit Version of Windows
    Stan Murawski - November 2001
    In this article the author modifies an industry standard middle-tier application server benchmark called Nile. The goal was to get it to build and run correctly on the 64-bit edition of the Microsoft .NET Advanced Server running on computers with Intel Itanium processors and still build as a 32-bit version to run on Pentium class x86 processors. While modifying Nile, the author discovered some of the tips he presents here. As the article explains, when modifying code for 64-bit Windows, data types are the key to success. The article discusses which types to use and when, along with new data types and the importance of memory alignment.

  • Autoplay in Windows XP: Automatically Detect and React to New Devices on a System
    Stephane St-Michel and Brian Aust - November 2001
    The last few years have seen dramatic growth in digital multimedia content and an increasing number of devices generating such content. Accordingly, the Autoplay feature of Microsoft Windows has been enhanced to handle these scenarios. This article presents samples that use the new features and provides advice on how to take advantage of these additions. The topics covered include Autoplay support for audio CDs and for DVD movies, the Autoplay registration process, event handlers, and how your software can cancel Autoplay when you don't want certain files interrupted. The download includes tools for diagnosing problems and to help the reader understand the shell hardware detection service processing of hardware events.

  • Under the Hood: New Vectored Exception Handling in Windows XP
    Matt Pietrek - September 2001


  • Windows XP: Make Your Components More Robust with COM+ 1.5 Innovations
    Juval Lowy - August 2001
    The next version of COM+, COM+ 1.5, offers many improvements over COM+ 1.0. A comprehensive user interface that displays more data for each application as well as complete support for legacy components make the management of existing applications easier and more efficient. Enhanced queueing support provides more flexibility for managing queued calls, and pooling and recycling means better application lifetime management. Application partitioning in COM+ 1.5 surpasses that offered in COM+ 1.0, and transaction isolation can be configured for safer transactions. COM+ 1.5 also allows you to expose any COM+ component as a Web service, as long as it meets certain criteria. This article discusses these and other new features in COM+ 1.5 that take care of much of the plumbing code, allowing developers to concentrate on business components.

  • C++ Q&A: Getting the Text of a Window in Another Application; Making Backspace Work in the Explorer Bar
    Paul DiLascia - August 2001


  • Whistler: Build More Flexible Console Snap-ins with the MMC 2.0 Object Model
    Vivek Jhaveri - March 2001
    Microsoft Management Console (MMC) 2.0 provides a host of exciting new features for MMC users and snap-in developers. The new MMC 2.0 automation object model allows much of the user interface of MMC 2.0 to be accessed through script, and exposes events so that many tasks can now easily be automated. The new view extension model uses HTML to enable extensions to seamlessly integrate new user interfaces with those of existing snap-ins. MMC 2.0 also includes a specific view extension snap-in, the Extended View snap-in, which provides an interface similar to Web folders. Drag and drop support has been expanded, and console files now use the XML file format. Enhancements to console taskpads make it easier to accomplish tasks.