MSDN Magazine: Remoting rss

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  • Transactions: Build Scalable Systems That Handle Failure Without Losing Data
    Udi Dahan - July 2008
    Systems that handle failure without losing data are elusive. Learn how to achieve systems that are both scalable and robust.

  • Foundations: What's New for WCF in Visual Studio 2008
    Juval Lowy - February 2008
    Visual Studio 2008 and the .NET Framework 3.5 provide new tools and support that extends Windows Communication Foundation (WCF). Visual Studio 2008 also automates a number of manual WCF tasks for the developer as well.

  • Foundations: Synchronization Contexts in WCF
    Juval Lowy - November 2007
    After a description of what synchronization contexts are and how WCF uses them, the author demonstrates various options for extending WCF to use custom synchronization contexts, both programmatically and declaratively.

  • Around the Horn: Engineer a Distributed System Using .NET Remoting for Process Intensive Analysis
    Nate D'Anna - May 2005
    Before the Microsoft .NET Framework, creating a distributed cluster of computers to perform scientific analysis was expensive in terms of hardware, programming and debugging time, and maintenance. You had to purchase expensive servers, spend time debugging network communication, design a distributed system completely different from a system deployed locally, and maintain a melting pot of error handling, data acquisition, networking, and analysis code. In this article, the author shows you how he was able to engineer a distributed computing system in C# to perform analysis of real-world data continuously acquired at high sampling rates, thanks to the .NET Framework.

  • Remoting: Managing the Lifetime of Remote .NET Objects with Leasing and Sponsorship
    Juval Lowy - December 2003
    Leasing and sponsorship is the solution for managing the lifecycle of a remote object in .NET. Each object has a lease that prevents the local garbage collector from destroying it, and most distributed applications rely upon leasing. There are several ways in which objects and clients can extend the lease, including dedicated sponsor objects. In this article, the author explains leasing, shows how to configure it, and how it relates to the various remoting activation models. He then discusses design guidelines and options, along with their impact on throughput and performance. Additionally, he introduces a helper class used to automate the management of lease sponsors.

  • Secure It: WS-Security and Remoting Channel Sinks Give Message-Level Security to Your SOAP Packets
    Neeraj Srivastava - November 2003
    As more organizations adopt XML-based Web Services, the need for message-level security has become evident. WS-Security, now supported in the Microsoft .NET Framework, addresses this need. Using the WS-Security framework, developers can implement channel sinks to intercept Remoting messages as they pass through the .NET Remoting infrastructure. The sink can read the message, change it, and pass it along. During this process, the message can be signed for added security. This article explains how to implement a Remoting channel sink that will modify the Remoting message by including a UserName token in the header, then sign the body using the token.

  • .NET Remoting: Create a Custom Marshaling Implementation Using .NET Remoting and COM Interop
    Jim Sievert - September 2003
    The .NET Framework offers several methods for customizing the presentation of native .NET and COM object types. One such technique, custom marshaling, refers to the notion of specializing object type presentations. There are times, like when a legacy COM component needs to implement a new interface or when you need to make calls across process or machine boundaries, when custom marshaling saves the day. Elements of COM Interop permit the customizing of COM types while .NET Remoting offers the developer the ability to tailor native .NET types. This article examines these techniques.

  • Cutting Edge: Managing Your Remote Windows Clipboard
    Dino Esposito - September 2003


  • .NET Remoting: Secure Your .NET Remoting Traffic by Writing an Asymmetric Encryption Channel Sink
    Stephen Toub - June 2003
    As .NET Remoting gains popularity in the enterprise space, it must meet business demands for trustworthy computing. Remoting traffic can be secured when objects are hosted in IIS, but when they aren't hosted in IIS, custom security solutions can be developed to secure them. This article provides an in-depth look at writing channel sinks for .NET. It also details the flow of data through custom channel sinks and explains the kinds of manipulations that can be performed on that data.

  • Contexts in .NET: Decouple Components by Injecting Custom Services into Your Object's Interception Chain
    Juval Lowy - March 2003
    The .NET Framework can use contexts as an object's execution scope and intercept calls going to and from the object, similar to the way COM+ provides component services. What is new with this mechanism is that the runtime allows developers to take part in the interception chain and add powerful services, thus extending existing component services. This in turn decouples the business logic from the system plumbing and simplifies long-term maintenance. Presently, .NET contexts and interception are undocumented aspects of .NET. This article presents the underlying interception architecture and message processing, explains custom context attributes, and walks through a custom interception-based component service.

  • .NET Remoting: Design and Develop Seamless Distributed Applications for the Common Language Runtime
    Dino Esposito - October 2002
    Prior to the advent of .NET, DCOM was the underlying technology for remote communications between Windows-based applications. But DCOM is quirky to set up and configure and not as interoperable as it should be. In .NET, XML Web Services and .NET Remoting are a seamless and effective answer to the demand for tools to build distributed applications.This article provides a primer on .NET Remoting with insights into the internal plumbing. Important aspects of remoting, such as channels, object lifetime management, and clients for remote objects are discussed. In addition, some practical examples are provided.