MSDN Magazine: Java rss

All MSDN Magazine Topics
  • Migration: Convert A Java Web Application To ASP.NET Using JLCA
    Brian Jimerson - May 2007


  • .NET Matters: BigInteger, GetFiles, and More
    Stephen Toub - December 2005


  • { End Bracket }: Microsoft Java Virtual Machine Update
    Brian Keller - October 2004
    In a settlement agreement reached in January 2001 to resolve a dispute over the Microsoft distribution of its Java implementation, Sun Microsystems and Microsoft agreed to limit the duration of the time Microsoft would use Sun's source code and compatibility test suites to support the Microsoft® Java Virtual Machine (MSJVM).

  • Resource File: Microsoft Virtual Machine Remediation
    - September 2003
    Developers who use the Microsoft virtual machine (VM) will need to transition away from its use by January 2004. To comply with a court settlement with Sun Microsystems, Microsoft will not be able to update the Microsoft VM, even to repair critical security vulnerabilities.

  • Zip Your Data: Using the Zip Classes in the J# Class Libraries to Compress Files and Data with C#
    Ianier Munoz - June 2003
    Zip compression lets you save space and network bandwidth when storing files or sending them over the wire. In addition, you don't lose the directory structure of folders you Zip, which makes it a pretty useful compression scheme. The C# language doesn't have any classes that let you manipulate Zip files, but since .NET-targeted languages can share class implementations, and J# exposes classes in the java.util.zip namespace, you can get to those classes in your C# code. This article explains how to use the Microsoft J# class libraries to create an application in C# that compresses and decompresses Zip files. It also shows other unique parts of the J# runtime you can use from any .NET-compliant language to save some coding.

  • Visual Studio .NET: What You Need to Know Today About the New and Upgraded Features in Visual Studio .NET 2003
    Carl Franklin - March 2003
    Any time an upgrade of a favorite tool is released, questions about compatibility, versioning, and changes in methodology abound. The release of Visual Studio .NET 2003 is no exception. Developers will be relieved to learn that breaking changes have been kept to a minimum, and delighted to learn that important new features, like Visual J#, have been added. These and other new features of the .NET Framework 1.1 and Visual Studio .NET 2003, including mobile support and improved debugging, are discussed here.

  • A Young Person's Guide to The Simple Object Access Protocol: SOAP Increases Interoperability Across
    Don Box - March 2000
    The Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) facilitates interoperability among a wide range of programs and platforms, making existing applications accessible to a broader range of users. SOAP combines the proven Web technology of HTTP with the flexibility and extensibility of XML. This article takes you on a comprehensive tour of Object RPC technology to help you understand the foundations of SOAP and the ways it overcomes many of the limitations of existing technologies, including DCOM and CORBA. This is followed by a detailed treatment of the SOAP encoding rules with a focus on how SOAP maps onto existing ORPC concepts.