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InvocationInfo.InvocationName Property

 

Updated: April 27, 2016

Applies To: Windows PowerShell

Gets the name of the command that was invoked.

Namespace:   System.Management.Automation
Assembly:  System.Management.Automation (in System.Management.Automation.dll)

public string InvocationName { get; internal set; }

Property Value

Type: System.String

A String that contains the name of the command that was invoked. For example, this could be a cmdlet name, a function name, or an alias that references a cmdlet or function.

The following code sample, pulled from the Runspace04 code sample in the SDK, displays InvocationName as part of an exception description.

private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      // Create a PowerShell object.
      using (PowerShell powershell = PowerShell.Create())
      {
        // Add the commands to the PowerShell object.
        powershell.AddCommand("Get-ChildItem").AddCommand("Select-String").AddArgument("*");

        // Run the commands synchronously. Because of the bad regular expression,
        // no objects will be returned. Instead, an exception will be thrown.
        try
        {
          foreach (PSObject result in powershell.Invoke())
          {
            Console.WriteLine("'{0}'", result.ToString());
          }

          // Process any error records that were generated while running the commands.
          Console.WriteLine("\nThe following non-terminating errors occurred:\n");
          PSDataCollection<ErrorRecord> errors = powershell.Streams.Error;
          if (errors != null && errors.Count > 0)
          {
            foreach (ErrorRecord err in errors)
            {
              System.Console.WriteLine("    error: {0}", err.ToString());
            }
          }
        }
        catch (RuntimeException runtimeException)
        {
          // Trap any exception generated by the commands. These exceptions
          // will all be derived from the RuntimeException exception.
          System.Console.WriteLine(
                        "Runtime exception: {0}: {1}\n{2}",
                        runtimeException.ErrorRecord.InvocationInfo.InvocationName,
                        runtimeException.Message,
                        runtimeException.ErrorRecord.InvocationInfo.PositionMessage);
        }
      }

      System.Console.WriteLine("\nHit any key to exit...");
      System.Console.ReadKey();
    }
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