Windows Dev Center

What's New

Windows PowerShell 2.0 provides the following new features for use when writing cmdlets, providers, and host applications.

Modules
You can now package and distribute Windows PowerShell solutions by using modules. Modules allow you to partition, organize, and abstract your Windows PowerShell code into self-contained, reusable units. For more information about modules, see Writing a Windows PowerShell Module.

The PowerShell class
The PowerShell class provides a simpler solution for creating applications, referred to as host applications, that programmatically run commands. This class allows you to create a pipeline of commands, specify the runspace that is used to run the commands, and specify invoking the commands synchronously or asynchronously.

The RunspacePool class
Runspace pools allow you to create multiple runspaces by using a single call. The CreateRunspacePool method provides several overloads that can be used to create runspaces that have the same features, such as the same host, initial session state, and connection information.

The InitialSessionState class
The InitialSessionState class allows you to create a session state configuration that is used when a runspace is opened. You can create a custom configuration, a default configuration that includes the commands provided by mshshort, and a configuration whose commands are restricted based on the capabilities of the session.

Remote runspaces
You can now create runspaces that can be opened on remote computers, allowing you to run commands on the remote machine and collect the results locally. To create a remote runspace, you must specify information about the remote connection when creating the runspace. See the CreateRunspace and CreateRunspacePool methods for examples. The connection information is defined by the RunspaceConnectionInfo class.

Private runspace elements
You can now create runspaces whose elements are public or private. This allows you to create runspaces whose elements are available to the runspace, but are not available to the user. See the ConstrainedSessionStateEntry class to find out which elements of the runspace can be made private.

Runspace threading modes and apartment state
You can now specify how threads are created and used when running commands in a runspace. See the System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.ThreadOptions and System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.RunspacePool.ThreadOptions properties.

You can now get the apartment state of the threads that are used to run commands in a runspace. See the System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.Runspace.ApartmentState and System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.RunspacePool.ApartmentState properties.

Transaction cmdlets
You can now create cmdlets that can be used within a transaction. When a cmdlet is used in a transaction, its actions are temporary, and they can be accepted or rejected by the transaction cmdlets provided by Windows PowerShell.

For more information about transactions, see How to Support Transactions.

Transaction provider
You can now create providers that can be used within a transaction. Similar to cmdlets, when a provider is used in a transaction, its actions are temporary, and they can be accepted or rejected by the transaction cmdlets provided by Windows PowerShell.

For more information about specifying support for transaction within a provider class, see the System.Management.Automation.Provider.CmdletProviderAttribute.ProviderCapabilities property.

Job cmdlets
You can now write cmdlets that can perform their action as a job. These jobs are run in the background without interacting with the current session. For more information about how Windows PowerShell supports jobs, see Background Jobs.

Cmdlet output types
You can now specify the .NET Framework types that are returned by your cmdlets by declaring the OutputType attribute when writing your cmdlets. This will allow others to determine what type of objects are returned by a cmdlet by looking at the OutputType property of the cmdlet.

Event support
You can now write cmdlets that add and consume events. See the PSEvent class.

Proxy commands
You can now write proxy commands that can be used to run another command. A proxy command allows you to control what functionality of the source cmdlet is available to the user. For example, you can create a proxy command that removes a parameter that is supplied by the source command. See the ProxyCommand class.

Multiple choice prompts
You can now write applications that can provide prompts that allow the user to select multiple choices. See the IHostUISupportsMultipleChoiceSelection interface

Interactive sessions
You can now write applications that can start and stop an interactive session on a remote computer. See the IHostSupportsInteractiveSession interface.

Custom Cmdlet Help for Providers
You can now create customized Help topics for the provider cmdlets. Custom cmdlet help topics can explain how the cmdlet works in the provider path and document special features, including the dynamic parameters that the provider adds to the cmdlet.

See Also



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