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Runspace03 Sample

 

This sample shows how to use the PowerShell class to run a script synchronously, and how to handle non-terminating errors. The script receives a list of process names and then retrieves those processes. The results of the script, including any non-terminating errors that were generated when running the script, are displayed in a console window.

Requirements

This sample requires Windows PowerShell 2.0.

Demonstrates

This sample demonstrates the following.

  • Creating a PowerShell object to run a script.

  • Adding a script to the pipeline of the PowerShell object.

  • Passing input objects to the script from the calling program.

  • Running the script synchronously.

  • Using PSObject objects to extract and display properties from the objects returned by the script.

  • Retrieving and displaying error records that were generated when the script was run.

Example

This sample runs a script synchronously in the default runspace provided by Windows PowerShell. The output of the script and any non-terminating errors that were generated are displayed in a console window.

namespace Microsoft.Samples.PowerShell.Runspaces
{
  using System;
  using System.Collections;
  using System.Management.Automation;
  using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;
  using PowerShell = System.Management.Automation.PowerShell;

  /// <summary>
  /// This class contains the Main entry point for this host application.
  /// </summary>
  internal class Runspace03
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// This sample shows how to use the PowerShell class to run a
    /// script that retrieves process information for the list of 
    /// process names passed to the script. It shows how to pass input 
    /// objects to a script and how to retrieve error objects as well 
    /// as the output objects.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">Parameter not used.</param>
    /// <remarks>
    /// This sample demonstrates the following:
    /// 1. Creating a PowerSHell object to run a script.
    /// 2. Adding a script to the pipeline of the PowerShell object.
    /// 3. Passing input objects to the script from the calling program.
    /// 4. Running the script synchronously.
    /// 5. Using PSObject objects to extract and display properties from 
    ///    the objects returned by the script.
    /// 6. Retrieving and displaying error records that were generated
    ///    when the script was run.
    /// </remarks>
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      // Define a list of processes to look for.
      string[] processNames = new string[] 
      {
        "lsass", "nosuchprocess", "services", "nosuchprocess2" 
      };

      // The script to run to get these processes. Input passed
      // to the script will be available in the $input variable.
      string script = "$input | get-process -name {$_}";

      // Create a PowerShell object. Creating this object takes care of 
      // building all of the other data structures needed to run the script.
      using (PowerShell powershell = PowerShell.Create())
      {
        powershell.AddScript(script);

        Console.WriteLine("Process              HandleCount");
        Console.WriteLine("--------------------------------");

        // Invoke the script synchronously and display the   
        // ProcessName and HandleCount properties of the 
        // objects that are returned.
        foreach (PSObject result in powershell.Invoke(processNames))
        {
          Console.WriteLine(
                            "{0,-20} {1}",
                            result.Members["ProcessName"].Value,
                            result.Members["HandleCount"].Value);
        }

        // Process any error records that were generated while running 
        //  the script.
        Console.WriteLine("\nThe following non-terminating errors occurred:\n");
        PSDataCollection<ErrorRecord> errors = powershell.Streams.Error;
        if (errors != null && errors.Count > 0)
        {
          foreach (ErrorRecord err in errors)
          {
            System.Console.WriteLine("    error: {0}", err.ToString());
          }
        }
      }

      System.Console.WriteLine("\nHit any key to exit...");
      System.Console.ReadKey();
    }
  }
}

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