InMemoryRandomAccessStream class

InMemoryRandomAccessStream class

Provides random access of data in input and output streams that are stored in memory instead of on disk.


var inMemoryRandomAccessStream = new Windows.Storage.Streams.InMemoryRandomAccessStream();


The InMemoryRandomAccessStream class has these types of members:


The InMemoryRandomAccessStream class has these constructors.

InMemoryRandomAccessStream Creates a new instance of the InMemoryRandomAccessStream class.



The InMemoryRandomAccessStream class has these methods. With C#, Visual Basic, and C++, it also inherits methods from the Object class.

CloneStream Creates a new instance of a IRandomAccessStream over the same resource as the current stream.
Close [C++, JavaScript]Closes the current stream and releases system resources.
Dispose [C#, VB]Performs tasks associated with freeing, releasing, or resetting unmanaged resources.
FlushAsync Flushes data asynchronously in a sequential stream.
GetInputStreamAt Returns an input stream at a specified location in a stream.
GetOutputStreamAt Returns an output stream at a specified location in a stream.
ReadAsync Returns an asynchronous byte reader object.
Seek Sets the position of the stream to the specified value.
WriteAsync Writes data asynchronously in a sequential stream.



The InMemoryRandomAccessStream class has these properties.

PropertyAccess typeDescription



Gets a value that indicates whether the stream can be read from.



Gets a value that indicates whether the stream can be written to.



Gets the byte offset of the stream.



Gets or sets the size of the random access stream.



The following example shows how to write and read strings to an in-memory stream. For the full code sample, see Reading and writing data sample.

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var page = WinJS.UI.Pages.define("/html/write-read-stream.html", {
        ready: function (element, options) {
            var sourceElement = document.getElementById("ElementsToSend");
            sourceElement.innerHTML = "Hello;World;1 2 3 4 5;Très bien!;Goodbye";
            var sendButton = document.getElementById("SendButton");
            sendButton.addEventListener("click", transferData);

function transferData() {
        var sourceElement = document.getElementById("ElementsToSend");
        var destinationElement = document.getElementById("scenario1Output");

        // First a DataWriter object is created, backed by an in-memory stream where 
        // the data will be stored.
        var writer = Windows.Storage.Streams.DataWriter(
            new Windows.Storage.Streams.InMemoryRandomAccessStream());
        writer.unicodeEncoding = Windows.Storage.Streams.UnicodeEncoding.utf8;
        writer.byteOrder = Windows.Storage.Streams.ByteOrder.littleEndian;

        // We separate the contents of the sourceElement div in multiple strings 
        // using ';' as the separator. Each string will be written separately.
        var elements = sourceElement.innerHTML.split(";");
        elements.forEach(function (element) {
            var codeUnits = writer.measureString(element);

        var reader;
        var stream;

        // The call to store async sends the actual contents of the writer 
        // to the backing stream.
        writer.storeAsync().then(function () {
            // For the in-memory stream implementation we are using, the flushAsync call 
            // is superfluous, but other types of streams may require it.
            return writer.flushAsync();
        }).then(function () {
            // We detach the stream to prolong its useful lifetime. Were we to fail 
            // to detach the stream, the call to writer.close() would close the underlying 
            // stream, preventing its subsequent use by the DataReader below. Most clients 
            // of DataWriter will have no reason to use the underlying stream after 
            // writer.close() is called, and will therefore have no reason to call
            // writer.detachStream(). Note that once we detach the stream, we assume 
            // responsibility for closing the stream subsequently; after the stream 
            // has been detached, a call to writer.close() will have no effect on the stream.
            stream = writer.detachStream();
            // Make sure the stream is read from the beginning in the reader 
            // we are creating below.
            // Most DataWriter clients will not call writer.detachStream(), 
            // and furthermore will be working with a file-backed or network-backed stream, 
            // rather than an in-memory-stream. In such cases, it would be particularly 
            // important to call writer.close(). Doing so is always a best practice.

            reader = new Windows.Storage.Streams.DataReader(stream);
            // The encoding and byte order need to match the settings of the writer 
            // we previously used.
            reader.unicodeEncoding = Windows.Storage.Streams.UnicodeEncoding.utf8;
            reader.byteOrder = Windows.Storage.Streams.ByteOrder.littleEndian;
            // Once we have written the contents successfully we load the stream, 
            // this is also an asynchronous operation
            return reader.loadAsync(stream.size);
        }).done(function () {
            var receivedStrings = "";
            // Keep reading until we consume the complete stream
            while (reader.unconsumedBufferLength > 0) {
                // Note that the call to readString requires a length of "code units" 
                // to read. This is the reason each string is preceeded by its length 
                // when "on the wire".
                var codeUnitsToRead = reader.readInt32();
                receivedStrings += reader.readString(codeUnitsToRead) + "<br/>";
            // Calling reader.close() closes the underlying stream. It would be particularly important
            // to call reader.close() if the underlying stream were file-backed or 
            // network-backed. Note that this call to reader.close() satisfies 
            // our obligation to close the stream previously detached from DataReader.
            destinationElement.innerHTML = receivedStrings;

Requirements (Windows 10 device family)

Device family

Universal, introduced version 10.0.10240.0

API contract

Windows.Foundation.UniversalApiContract, introduced version 1.0


Windows::Storage::Streams [C++]



Requirements (Windows 8.x and Windows Phone 8.x)

Minimum supported client

Windows 8 [Windows Store apps only]

Minimum supported server

Windows Server 2012 [Windows Store apps only]

Minimum supported phone

Windows Phone 8.1 [Windows Phone Silverlight 8.1 and Windows Runtime apps]


Windows::Storage::Streams [C++]





See also

Reading and writing data sample
Serializing and deserializing data sample (Windows 10)



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