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Math.Pow Method (Double, Double)

 
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Returns a specified number raised to the specified power.

Namespace:   System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public static double Pow(
	double x,
	double y
)

Parameters

x
Type: System.Double

A double-precision floating-point number to be raised to a power.

y
Type: System.Double

A double-precision floating-point number that specifies a power.

Return Value

Type: System.Double

The number x raised to the power y.

The following table indicates the return value when various values or ranges of values are specified for the x and y parameters. For more information, see Double.PositiveInfinity, Double.NegativeInfinity, and Double.NaN.

Parameters

Return value

x or y = NaN.

NaN

x = Any value except NaN; y = 0.

1

x = NegativeInfinity; y < 0.

0

x = NegativeInfinity; y is a positive odd integer.

NegativeInfinity

x = NegativeInfinity; y is positive but not an odd integer.

PositiveInfinity

x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity.

NaN

x = -1; y = NegativeInfinity or PositiveInfinity.

NaN

-1 < x < 1; y = NegativeInfinity.

PositiveInfinity

-1 < x < 1; y = PositiveInfinity.

0

x < -1 or x > 1; y = NegativeInfinity.

0

x < -1 or x > 1; y = PositiveInfinity.

PositiveInfinity

x = 0; y < 0.

PositiveInfinity

x = 0; y > 0.

0

x = 1; y is any value except NaN.

1

x = PositiveInfinity; y < 0.

0

x = PositiveInfinity; y > 0.

PositiveInfinity

The following example uses the Pow method to calculate the value that results from raising 2 to a power ranging from 0 to 32.

using System;

public class Example
{
   public static void Main()
   {
      int value = 2;
      for (int power = 0; power <= 32; power++)
         Console.WriteLine("{0}^{1} = {2:N0} (0x{2:X})", 
                           value, power, (long)Math.Pow(value, power));
   }
}
// The example displays the following output:
//     2^0 = 1 (0x1)
//     2^1 = 2 (0x2)
//     2^2 = 4 (0x4)
//     2^3 = 8 (0x8)
//     2^4 = 16 (0x10)
//     2^5 = 32 (0x20)
//     2^6 = 64 (0x40)
//     2^7 = 128 (0x80)
//     2^8 = 256 (0x100)
//     2^9 = 512 (0x200)
//     2^10 = 1,024 (0x400)
//     2^11 = 2,048 (0x800)
//     2^12 = 4,096 (0x1000)
//     2^13 = 8,192 (0x2000)
//     2^14 = 16,384 (0x4000)
//     2^15 = 32,768 (0x8000)
//     2^16 = 65,536 (0x10000)
//     2^17 = 131,072 (0x20000)
//     2^18 = 262,144 (0x40000)
//     2^19 = 524,288 (0x80000)
//     2^20 = 1,048,576 (0x100000)
//     2^21 = 2,097,152 (0x200000)
//     2^22 = 4,194,304 (0x400000)
//     2^23 = 8,388,608 (0x800000)
//     2^24 = 16,777,216 (0x1000000)
//     2^25 = 33,554,432 (0x2000000)
//     2^26 = 67,108,864 (0x4000000)
//     2^27 = 134,217,728 (0x8000000)
//     2^28 = 268,435,456 (0x10000000)
//     2^29 = 536,870,912 (0x20000000)
//     2^30 = 1,073,741,824 (0x40000000)
//     2^31 = 2,147,483,648 (0x80000000)
//     2^32 = 4,294,967,296 (0x100000000)

Universal Windows Platform
Available since 8
.NET Framework
Available since 1.1
Portable Class Library
Supported in: portable .NET platforms
Silverlight
Available since 2.0
Windows Phone Silverlight
Available since 7.0
Windows Phone
Available since 8.1
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