Single.Parse Method (String, IFormatProvider)

Converts the string representation of a number in a specified culture-specific format to its single-precision floating-point number equivalent.

Namespace:  System
Assembly:  mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll)

public static float Parse(
	string s,
	IFormatProvider provider
)

Parameters

s
Type: System.String

A string that contains a number to convert.

provider
Type: System.IFormatProvider

An object that supplies culture-specific formatting information about s.

Return Value

Type: System.Single
A single-precision floating-point number equivalent to the numeric value or symbol specified in s.

ExceptionCondition
ArgumentNullException

s is null.

FormatException

s does not represent a number in a valid format.

OverflowException

s represents a number less than MinValue or greater than MaxValue.

This overload is typically used to convert text that can be formatted in a variety of ways to a Single value. For example, it can be used to convert the text entered by a user into an HTML text box to a numeric value.

The s parameter is interpreted using a combination of the NumberStyles.Float and NumberStyles.AllowThousands flags. The s parameter can contain NumberFormatInfo.PositiveInfinitySymbol, NumberFormatInfo.NegativeInfinitySymbol, or NumberFormatInfo.NaNSymbol for the culture specified by provider, or it can contain a string of the form:

[ws][sign]integral-digits[.[fractional-digits]][E[sign]exponential-digits][ws]

Optional elements are framed in square brackets ([ and ]). Elements that contain the term "digits" consist of a series of numeric characters ranging from 0 to 9.

Element

Description

ws

A series of white-space characters.

sign

A negative sign symbol (-) or a positive sign symbol (+).

integral-digits

A series of digits ranging from 0 to 9 that specify the integral part of the number. Runs of integral-digits can be partitioned by a group-separator symbol. For example, in some cultures a comma (,) separates groups of thousands. The integral-digits element can be absent if the string contains the fractional-digits element.

.

A culture-specific decimal point symbol.

fractional-digits

A series of digits ranging from 0 to 9 that specify the fractional part of the number.

E

The "e" or "E" character, which indicates that the value is represented in exponential (scientific) notation.

exponential-digits

A series of digits ranging from 0 to 9 that specify an exponent.

For more information about numeric formats, see the Formatting Types in the .NET Framework topic.

The provider parameter is an IFormatProvider implementation whose GetFormat method returns a NumberFormatInfo object that provides culture-specific formatting information. When the Parse(String, IFormatProvider) method is invoked, it calls the provider parameter's GetFormat method and passes it a Type object that represents the NumberFormatInfo type. The GetFormat method then returns the NumberFormatInfo object that provides information about the format of the s parameter. There are three ways to use the provider parameter to supply custom formatting information to the parse operation:

  • You can pass a CultureInfo object that represents the culture that supplies formatting information. Its GetFormat method returns the NumberFormatInfo object that provides numeric formatting information for that culture.

  • You can pass the actual NumberFormatInfo object that provides numeric formatting information. (Its implementation of GetFormat just returns itself.)

  • You can pass a custom object that implements IFormatProvider. Its GetFormat method instantiates and returns the NumberFormatInfo object that provides formatting information.

If provider is null or a NumberFormatInfo cannot be obtained, the formatting information for the current system culture is used.

If a separator is encountered in the s parameter during a parse operation, and the applicable currency or number decimal and group separators are the same, the parse operation assumes that the separator is a decimal separator rather than a group separator. For more information about separators, see CurrencyDecimalSeparator, NumberDecimalSeparator, CurrencyGroupSeparator, and NumberGroupSeparator.

Some examples of s are "100", "-123,456,789", "123.45e+6", "+500", "5e2", "3.1416", "600.", "-.123", and "-Infinity".

The following example is the button click event handler of a Web form. It uses the array returned by the HttpRequest.UserLanguages property to determine the user's locale. It then instantiates a CultureInfo object that corresponds to that locale. The NumberFormatInfo object that belongs to that CultureInfo object is then passed to the Parse(String, IFormatProvider) method to convert the user's input to a Single value.

protected void OkToSingle_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   string locale;
   float number;
   CultureInfo culture; 

   // Return if string is empty 
   if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(this.inputNumber.Text))
      return;

   // Get locale of web request to determine possible format of number 
   if (Request.UserLanguages.Length == 0)
      return;
   locale = Request.UserLanguages[0];
   if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(locale))
      return; 

   // Instantiate CultureInfo object for the user's locale
   culture = new CultureInfo(locale);

   // Convert user input from a string to a number 
   try
   {
      number = Single.Parse(this.inputNumber.Text, culture.NumberFormat);
   }
   catch (FormatException)
   {
      return;
   }
   catch (Exception)
   {
      return;
   }
   // Output number to label on web form 
   this.outputNumber.Text = "Number is " + number.ToString();
}

.NET Framework

Supported in: 4.6, 4.5, 4, 3.5, 3.0, 2.0, 1.1

.NET Framework Client Profile

Supported in: 4, 3.5 SP1

XNA Framework

Supported in: 3.0, 2.0, 1.0

Portable Class Library

Supported in: Portable Class Library

Supported in: Windows Phone 8.1

Supported in: Windows Phone Silverlight 8.1

Supported in: Windows Phone Silverlight 8
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