ConfigurationManager Class

 

Provides access to configuration files for client applications. This class cannot be inherited.

Namespace:   System.Configuration
Assembly:  System.Configuration (in System.Configuration.dll)

System.Object
  System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager

public static class ConfigurationManager

NameDescription
System_CAPS_pubpropertySystem_CAPS_staticAppSettings

Gets the AppSettingsSection data for the current application's default configuration.

System_CAPS_pubpropertySystem_CAPS_staticConnectionStrings

Gets the ConnectionStringsSection data for the current application's default configuration.

NameDescription
System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticGetSection(String)

Retrieves a specified configuration section for the current application's default configuration.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenExeConfiguration(ConfigurationUserLevel)

Opens the configuration file for the current application as a Configuration object.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenExeConfiguration(String)

Opens the specified client configuration file as a Configuration object.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenMachineConfiguration()

Opens the machine configuration file on the current computer as a Configuration object.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenMappedExeConfiguration(ExeConfigurationFileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel)

Opens the specified client configuration file as a Configuration object that uses the specified file mapping and user level.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenMappedExeConfiguration(ExeConfigurationFileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel, Boolean)

Opens the specified client configuration file as a Configuration object that uses the specified file mapping, user level, and preload option.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticOpenMappedMachineConfiguration(ConfigurationFileMap)

Opens the machine configuration file as a Configuration object that uses the specified file mapping.

System_CAPS_pubmethodSystem_CAPS_staticRefreshSection(String)

Refreshes the named section so the next time that it is retrieved it will be re-read from disk.

The ConfigurationManager class enables you to access machine, application, and user configuration information. This class replaces the ConfigurationSettings class, which is deprecated. For web applications, use the WebConfigurationManager class.

To use the ConfigurationManager class, your project must reference the System.Configuration assembly. By default, some project templates, like Console Application, do not reference this assembly so you must manually reference it.

System_CAPS_noteNote

The name and location of the application configuration file depend on the application's host. For more information, see NIB: Application Configuration Files.

You can use the built-in System.Configuration types or derive from them to handle configuration information. By using these types, you can work directly with configuration information and you can extend configuration files to include custom information.

The ConfigurationManager class includes members that enable you to perform the following tasks:

Notes to Implementers:

The Configuration class enables programmatic access for editing configuration files. You use one of the Open methods provided by ConfigurationManager. These methods return a Configuration object, which in turn provides the required methods and properties to handle the underlying configuration files. You can access these files for reading or writing.

To read the configuration files, use GetSection or GetSectionGroup to read configuration information. The user or process that reads must have the following permissions:

  • Read permission on the configuration file at the current configuration hierarchy level.

  • Read permissions on all the parent configuration files.

If your application needs read-only access to its own configuration, we recommend that you use the GetSection method. This method provides access to the cached configuration values for the current application, which has better performance than the Configuration class.

To write to the configuration files, use one of the Save methods. The user or process that writes must have the following permissions:

  • Write permission on the configuration file and directory at the current configuration hierarchy level.

  • Read permissions on all the configuration files.

The first example shows a simple console application that reads application settings, adds a new setting, and updates an existing setting.

using System;
using System.Configuration;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ReadAllSettings();
            ReadSetting("Setting1");
            ReadSetting("NotValid");
            AddUpdateAppSettings("NewSetting", "May 7, 2014");
            AddUpdateAppSettings("Setting1", "May 8, 2014");
            ReadAllSettings();
        }

        static void ReadAllSettings()
        {
            try
            {
                var appSettings = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;

                if (appSettings.Count == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("AppSettings is empty.");
                }
                else
                {
                    foreach (var key in appSettings.AllKeys)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Key: {0} Value: {1}", key, appSettings[key]);
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (ConfigurationErrorsException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error reading app settings");
            }
        }

        static void ReadSetting(string key)
        {
            try
            {
                var appSettings = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;
                string result = appSettings[key] ?? "Not Found";
                Console.WriteLine(result);
            }
            catch (ConfigurationErrorsException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error reading app settings");
            }
        }

        static void AddUpdateAppSettings(string key, string value)
        {
            try
            {
                var configFile = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(ConfigurationUserLevel.None);
                var settings = configFile.AppSettings.Settings;
                if (settings[key] == null)
                {
                    settings.Add(key, value);
                }
                else
                {
                    settings[key].Value = value;
                }
                configFile.Save(ConfigurationSaveMode.Modified);
                ConfigurationManager.RefreshSection(configFile.AppSettings.SectionInformation.Name);
            }
            catch (ConfigurationErrorsException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error writing app settings");
            }
        }
    }
}

The previous example assumes your project has an App.config file as shown below.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <startup> 
        <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" sku=".NETFramework,Version=v4.5" />
    </startup>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="Setting1" value="May 5, 2014"/>
    <add key="Setting2" value="May 6, 2014"/>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

The following example shows how to use a connection string to read data from a database.

using System;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ReadProducts();
        }

        static void ReadProducts()
        {
            var connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["WingtipToys"].ConnectionString;
            string queryString = "SELECT Id, ProductName FROM dbo.Products;";
            using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
            {
                var command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);
                connection.Open();
                using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}, {1}", reader[0], reader[1]));
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The previous example assumes your project has an App.config as shown below.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <startup> 
        <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" sku=".NETFramework,Version=v4.5" />
    </startup>
    <connectionStrings>
      <add name="WingtipToys" connectionString="Data Source=(LocalDB)\v11.0;Initial Catalog=WingtipToys;Integrated Security=True;Pooling=False" />
    </connectionStrings>
</configuration>

.NET Framework
Available since 2.0

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

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