SQL Server failure recovery

 

Applies To: Dynamics CRM 2016

If the computer that is running Microsoft SQL Server fails, you must restore the databases from backup, and then reassociate them with the Microsoft Dynamics CRM deployment.


  1. Install Microsoft Windows Server and make sure that the computer is in the same domain as the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server or Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server roles. In addition, you should use the same database name and disk structure. If you change either of these, you must take additional steps to correctly restore the SQL Server databases.

  2. Install SQL Server. For supported versions, see SQL Server editions.

  3. If you have a valid backup of the master database, restore that backup. For more information, see MSDN: Back Up and Restore of System Databases in SQL Server Books Online.

  4. Restore the msdb database. For more information, see MSDN: Back Up and Restore of System Databases in SQL Server Books Online.

  5. Restore the MSCRM_CONFIG and OrganizationName_MSCRM databases. For more information about how to restore SQL Server databases, see MSDN: Back Up and Restore of SQL Server Databases.

  6. If Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services and the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Reporting Extensions are also installed on the instance of SQL Server, restore the ReportServer and ReportServertempDB databases. For more information about how to restore databases, see MSDN: Backup and Restore of SQL Server Databases.

  7. If you restored the MSCRM_CONFIG database, you must run Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server Setup and use the Connect to existing databases option on the Specify Deployment Options page. If you didn’t restore the MSCRM_CONFIG database and the database is functioning correctly, you can reconnect the organization database to the system. To do this, run the Disable-CrmOrganization and Edit-CrmOrganization Windows PowerShell commands. More information: Administer the deployment using Windows PowerShell. Alternatively, in Deployment Manager right-click the organization and select Disable, right-click the organization again, click Edit Organization, and then change the SQL Server value in the wizard. For more information about how to edit an organization, see Edit an organization's attributes.

This scenario is a worst-case situation, that is, a total failure of the computer that is running SQL Server. In other circumstances, such as the failure of a disk, you may only have to restore a single database to recover the environment.

For more information about high availability and disaster recovery using SQL Server availability groups, see AlwaysOn Availability Groups (SQL Server) and Set configuration and organization databases for SQL Server AlwaysOn failover.

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