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Creating Automated Attendants in UCMA 3.0 and Lync 2010: How the Applications Interact (Part 2 of 5)

Summary:   Learn how a Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA) 3.0 application can process dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) tones that are sent from a Microsoft Lync 2010 application. Part 2 describes the interactions of the UCMA 3.0 application and the Lync 2010 application.

Published:   December 2011 | Provided by:   John Austin and Mark Parker, Microsoft | About the Authors

Contents

This is the second in a five-part series of articles about how to build client and middle-tier applications that interact by using dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) tones in a Microsoft Lync 2010 API and using speech synthesis in a Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA) 3.0 application.

The following list summarizes the actions of the Microsoft Lync 2010 and Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA) 3.0 applications.

  1. After the UCMA 3.0 application starts, it waits for an incoming call to arrive from the Lync 2010 application.

  2. When a call arrives, the UCMA 3.0 application speaks a prompt that welcomes the caller to Northwind Traders, and asks the caller to click 1 on the keypad for sporting goods, 2 for kitchen goods, or 3 for automotive parts and services.

  3. The caller clicks 1, 2, or 3.

  4. Depending on which key was pressed, the UCMA 3.0 application plays a second-level prompt, asking the user to click 1, 2, or 3.

  5. The caller clicks 1, 2, or 3.

  6. The UCMA 3.0 application speaks a prompt of the form “Transferring to …” to the user. This prompt specifies which of the nine departments the call is being transferred to.

Figure 1 shows the DTMF menu hierarchy and the prompts that are played to the caller.

Figure 1. Menu hierarchy for the UCMA application

Menu hierarchy for the UCMA application

John Austin, Microsoft, is a programmer/writer in the Lync client SDK documentation team. He has been writing Microsoft technical documentation for four years. Prior to working for Microsoft, John spent two decades as a software developer. Mark Parker is a programming writer at Microsoft whose current responsibility is the UCMA SDK documentation. Mark previously worked on the Microsoft Speech Server 2007 documentation.

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