Using UCMA 3.0 and Lync 2010 for Contextual Communication: Summary (Part 6 of 6)

Summary:   This article is the final article in a series of six articles that describe how to create a Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA) 3.0 Core application that sets up a two-way contextual data channel with a Microsoft Silverlight application. The Silverlight application runs in the Microsoft Lync 2010 Conversation Window Extension.

Many tips revolve around the tricky subject of registering conceptual applications.

  • Proper use of the two kinds of application registration—Install Registration and Run-Time Registration—is important. For more information, see Register Contextual Conversation Packages in Lync 2010 in the Lync 2010 SDK documentation.

  • Understand which Registry entries are required and which are optional. For more information, see Register Contextual Conversation Packages in Lync 2010.

  • Use localhost for the InternalURL registry entry.

  • Microsoft Internet Information Service (IIS) Manager is used in the deployment of the applications discussed in this series of articles.

Consider the following tools for debugging scenarios that involve a Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API (UCMA) 3.0 application and a Microsoft Lync 2010 application.

  • Snooper.exe: This protocol analysis tool can help you analyze Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and Centralized Conferencing Control Protocol (C3P) protocol logs, including those generated by OCSLogger.exe. It is available at the Microsoft Download Center.

  • Microsoft Network Monitor 3.4: Like Snooper, Network Monitor is a protocol analyzer. You can capture, view, and analyze network traffic with this tool. It is available at the Microsoft Download Center.

  • A Lync 2010 desktop application that is used to obtain the Conversation object: In dealing with scenarios such as the one described in this series of articles, it can be useful to create a separate application to use the ConversationManager class to loop through the collection of currently active conversations. Typically the Conversation object that you want is the only one active object. Examining the Properties property on the Conversation instance will often help resolve issues.

For a UCMA 3.0 application, the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Logging Tool can be used to capture logging and trace information for the UCMA 3.0 application while it is running. Snooper.exe can be used to analyze the logging and trace information, which can be helpful in understanding the SIP and other messages that are sent while an application is active. Lync Server 2010 Logging Tool and Snooper.exe are available as part of UCMA 3.0 SDK. Snooper.exe is also available in the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Resource Kit.

For a Lync 2010 application, logging and trace information for the current Lync 2010 session is located in %UserProfile%\tracing\Communicator-uccapi-0.uccapilog. Each time that a user signs in to Lync 2010, the earlier version of this file is saved with a different name, and a new file that uses this name is created.

The following illustration shows SIP message traffic that is generated when the scenario described in this topic is implemented.

Figure 1. SIP message flow in the UCMA 3.0 and Lync 2010 applications

Data flow in contextual data application

Combine the server-side UCMA 3.0 features with the client-side features that are available in the Lync 2010 client by building applications that communicate between the two products.

Mark Parker and John Clarkson are programming writers with the Microsoft Lync product team.

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