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This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

patterns & practices Developer Center

Improving .NET Application Performance and Scalability

J.D. Meier, Srinath Vasireddy, Ashish Babbar, Rico Mariani, and Alex Mackman
Microsoft Corporation

May 2004

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patterns & practices Library

By Brandon Bohling

The Microsoft® .NET Framework has been a big win for the development community. Developers can now build business solutions in less time and with more functionality and robustness than ever before. However, architecting and designing these solutions is not necessarily straightforward, and with more features and functionality, developers have an increased opportunity to build poor solutions. Features without appropriate guidance can be the seeds of chaos. Unfortunately, few resources have been available to assist .NET developers in this area. However, Microsoft patterns & practices are designed to fill this gap.

All of the patterns & practices are thorough enough to be used as-is, yet flexible enough to be enhanced and modified to meet particular needs, or even simply used as a baseline to create your own guides and frameworks. Plus, they provide architectural and operational frameworks that business solutions can be built upon, and they provide a common vocabulary to facilitate efficient discussions between architects, developers, and other IT professionals. It is these frameworks that are the key to harvesting the power of .NET and to developing robust yet resilient architectures. Once you have the frameworks in place, you can build solid, reusable code — the patterns & practices guides prepare you to build the frameworks.

Improving .NET Application Performance and Scalability is yet another example of how Microsoft has listened to the needs of the development community and has provided comprehensive guidance for developing robust, high-performing .NET solutions. Microsoft has made this guide (as well as other patterns & practices guides) very easy to consume by providing high-level views of the information, checklists, and of course chapters covering specific topics in great detail. This guide provides architects, developers, and administrators with the necessary information to design, develop, review, and evaluate .NET solutions.

Improving .NET Application Performance and Scalability goes far beyond simply providing the reader with tips and tricks for improving performance. It provides information on how to begin designing for performance early, as well as for reviewing it throughout the application life cycle. The chapter on performance modeling is absolutely fantastic as it provides the recipe for creating a performance model that is well structured and reusable. Performance modeling is the key for your team to determine whether your architecture and design decisions are inline with your performance objectives.

At Intel we have found this to be an extremely useful reference for all stages of our development life cycle, not only because of the wealth of content, but also because of how it is organized. Whether you are looking for some quick performance tips or you wish to gain a greater depth of knowledge on performance, Improving .NET Application Performance and Scalability is a guide that delivers — it is the tool for creating high-performing, scalable solutions.

Brandon Bohling
Application Architect
Intel Corporation
March, 2004

Brandon Bohling is an Application Architect at Intel Corporation. He has been working with .NET since the early beta days, working with a group of evangelists at Intel to drive the consistent and (re)use of Microsoft .NET by providing standards, guidelines, and reusable assets. Once upon a time, he also coauthored a Wrox book, "Professional ASP.NET Web Services."

patterns & practices Developer Center

Retired Content

This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

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