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Using Standard and Custom Web Parts

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This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

Standard Web Parts are provided by SharePoint and developers can write custom Web Parts. Custom Web Parts can serve as wrappers for custom ASCX user controls. For an introduction to Web Parts, see ASP.NET Web Part Controls on MSDN.

Using Standard SharePoint Web Parts

Some of the most widely used standard Web Parts includes the List View, Library View, User Tasks, and Page Viewer. The List View Web Part is included in both the manager and training dashboards. To learn how the manager dashboard is implemented, see View the Manager Dashboard Use Case. To learn how the training dashboard is implemented, see View the Training Dashboard Use Case. For more information about SharePoint Web Parts, see Web Parts in Windows SharePoint Services on MSDN.

Using Custom Web Parts

Use custom Web Parts when no standard SharePoint Web Part is suitable. In many cases, a custom Web Part is necessary because the Web Part relies on an external data source, or a specialized user interface is required to display the data. For example, custom Web Parts display the manager's direct reports and accounting information on the manager dashboard.

A custom Web Part can be used as a wrapper to display a custom user control. An advantage to user controls is that you can use the Visual Studio design view to develop them. This option is not available when developing Web Parts server controls. If you decide to use a custom user control, you must deploy the ASCX file and the Web Part. The manager dashboard uses a custom user control with a Web Part wrapper to display the manager's direct reports. To learn how to wrap a user control in a Web Part, see How to: Wrap a User Control Inside of a Web Part for SharePoint.

A custom server control is more appropriate than a user control if the functionality it provides is highly reusable and if the control does not need to be developed using the Visual Studio design view.


Retired Content

This content is outdated and is no longer being maintained. It is provided as a courtesy for individuals who are still using these technologies. This page may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

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