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Range.FindNext Method (Excel)

Continues a search that was begun with the Find method. Finds the next cell that matches those same conditions and returns a Range object that represents that cell. This does not affect the selection or the active cell.

expression .FindNext(After)

expression A variable that represents a Range object.

Parameters

Name

Required/Optional

Data Type

Description

After

Optional

Variant

The cell after which you want to search. This corresponds to the position of the active cell when a search is done from the user interface. Be aware that After must be a single cell in the range. Remember that the search begins after this cell; the specified cell is not searched until the method wraps back around to this cell. If this argument is not specified, the search starts after the cell in the upper-left corner of the range.

Return Value

Range

When the search reaches the end of the specified search range, it wraps around to the beginning of the range. To stop a search when this wraparound occurs, save the address of the first found cell, and then test each successive found-cell address against this saved address.

This example finds all cells in the range A1:A500 that contain the value 2 and changes their values to 5.

With Worksheets(1).Range("a1:a500") 
    Set c = .Find(2, lookin:=xlValues) 
    If Not c Is Nothing Then 
        firstAddress = c.Address 
        Do 
            c.Value = 5 
            Set c = .FindNext(c) 
        Loop While Not c Is Nothing And c.Address <> firstAddress 
    End If 
End With

Sample code provided by: MVP Contributor Dennis Wallentin, VSTO & .NET & Excel | About the Contributor

This example finds all the cells in the first four columns that have a constant “X” in them and hides the column that contains the X.

Sub Hide_Columns()

    'Excel objects.
    Dim m_wbBook As Workbook
    Dim m_wsSheet As Worksheet
    Dim m_rnCheck As Range
    Dim m_rnFind As Range
    Dim m_stAddress As String

    'Initialize the Excel objects.
    Set m_wbBook = ThisWorkbook
    Set m_wsSheet = m_wbBook.Worksheets("Sheet1")
    
    'Search the four columns for any constants.
    Set m_rnCheck = m_wsSheet.Range("A1:D1").SpecialCells(xlCellTypeConstants)
    
    'Retrieve all columns that contain an X. If there is at least one, begin the DO/WHILE loop.
    With m_rnCheck
        Set m_rnFind = .Find(What:="X")
        If Not m_rnFind Is Nothing Then
            m_stAddress = m_rnFind.Address
             
            'Hide the column, and then find the next X.
            Do
                m_rnFind.EntireColumn.Hidden = True
                Set m_rnFind = .FindNext(m_rnFind)
            Loop While Not m_rnFind Is Nothing And m_rnFind.Address <> m_stAddress
        End If
    End With

End Sub

This example finds all the cells in the first four columns that have a constant “X” in them and unhides the column that contains the X.

Sub Unhide_Columns()
    'Excel objects.
    Dim m_wbBook As Workbook
    Dim m_wsSheet As Worksheet
    Dim m_rnCheck As Range
    Dim m_rnFind As Range
    Dim m_stAddress As String
    
    'Initialize the Excel objects.
    Set m_wbBook = ThisWorkbook
    Set m_wsSheet = m_wbBook.Worksheets("Sheet1")
    
    'Search the four columns for any constants.
    Set m_rnCheck = m_wsSheet.Range("A1:D1").SpecialCells(xlCellTypeConstants)
    
    'Retrieve all columns that contain X. If there is at least one, begin the DO/WHILE loop.
    With m_rnCheck
        Set m_rnFind = .Find(What:="X", LookIn:=xlFormulas)
        If Not m_rnFind Is Nothing Then
            m_stAddress = m_rnFind.Address
            
            'Unhide the column, and then find the next X.
            Do
                m_rnFind.EntireColumn.Hidden = False
                Set m_rnFind = .FindNext(m_rnFind)
            Loop While Not m_rnFind Is Nothing And m_rnFind.Address <> m_stAddress
        End If
    End With

End Sub

Dennis Wallentin is the author of VSTO & .NET & Excel, a blog that focuses on .NET Framework solutions for Excel and Excel Services. Dennis has been developing Excel solutions for over 20 years and is also the co-author of "Professional Excel Development: The Definitive Guide to Developing Applications Using Microsoft Excel, VBA and .NET (2nd Edition)."

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