1.1 Glossary

This document uses the following terms:

address book: A collection of Address Book objects, each of which are contained in any number of address lists.

Address Book object: An entity in an address book that contains a set of attributes, each attribute with a set of associated values.

address creation template: A template that describes how to present a dialog to a messaging user along with a script describing how to construct a new email address from the user's response.

address type: An identifier for the type of email address, such as SMTP and EX.

Augmented Backus-Naur Form (ABNF): A modified version of Backus-Naur Form (BNF), commonly used by Internet specifications. ABNF notation balances compactness and simplicity with reasonable representational power. ABNF differs from standard BNF in its definitions and uses of naming rules, repetition, alternatives, order-independence, and value ranges. For more information, see [RFC5234].

code page: An ordered set of characters of a specific script in which a numerical index (code-point value) is associated with each character. Code pages are a means of providing support for character sets and keyboard layouts used in different countries. Devices such as the display and keyboard can be configured to use a specific code page and to switch from one code page (such as the United States) to another (such as Portugal) at the user's request.

display template: A template that describes how to display or allow a user to modify information about an Address Book object.

distinguished name (DN): (1) A name that uniquely identifies an object by using the relative distinguished name (RDN) for the object, and the names of container objects and domains that contain the object. The distinguished name (DN) identifies the object and its location in a tree.

(2) In the Active Directory directory service, the unique identifier of an object in Active Directory, as described in [MS-ADTS] and [RFC2251].

double-byte character set (DBCS): A character set (1) that can use more than one byte to represent a single character. A DBCS includes some characters that consist of 1 byte and some characters that consist of 2 bytes. Languages such as Chinese, Japanese, and Korean use DBCS.

entry ID: See EntryID.

flags: A set of values used to configure or report options or settings.

handle: Any token that can be used to identify and access an object such as a device, file, or a window.

language code identifier (LCID): A 32-bit number that identifies the user interface human language dialect or variation that is supported by an application or a client computer.

mail user: An Address Book object that represents a person or entity that can receive deliverable messages.

name service provider interface (NSPI): A method of performing address-book-related operations on Active Directory.

non-Unicode: A character set (1) that has a restricted set of glyphs, such as Shift_JIS or ISO-2022-JP.

recipient: An entity that is in an address list, can receive email messages, and contains a set of attributes (1). Each attribute has a set of associated values.

remote procedure call (RPC): A context-dependent term commonly overloaded with three meanings. Note that much of the industry literature concerning RPC technologies uses this term interchangeably for any of the three meanings. Following are the three definitions: (*) The runtime environment providing remote procedure call facilities. The preferred usage for this meaning is "RPC runtime". (*) The pattern of request and response message exchange between two parties (typically, a client and a server). The preferred usage for this meaning is "RPC exchange". (*) A single message from an exchange as defined in the previous definition. The preferred usage for this term is "RPC message". For more information about RPC, see [C706].

search template: A template that defines a dialog box which enables users to specify search criteria for Address Book objects.

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP): A member of the TCP/IP suite of protocols that is used to transport Internet messages, as described in [RFC5321].

MAY, SHOULD, MUST, SHOULD NOT, MUST NOT: These terms (in all caps) are used as defined in [RFC2119]. All statements of optional behavior use either MAY, SHOULD, or SHOULD NOT.

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