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uncustomized: A condition of a document whose content is stored in a location other than the content database. If a document is uncustomized, the front-end web server determines the location of the content by using the SetupPath value for the document. Also referred to as ghosted.

Unicode: (1) A character encoding standard developed by the Unicode Consortium that represents almost all of the written languages of the world. The Unicode standard provides three forms (UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32) and seven schemes (UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16 BE, UTF-16 LE, UTF-32, UTF-32 LE, and UTF-32 BE).

(2) A character encoding standard developed by the Unicode Consortium that represents almost all of the written languages of the world. The Unicode standard [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] provides three forms (UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32) and seven schemes (UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16 BE, UTF-16 LE, UTF-32, UTF-32 LE, and UTF-32 BE).

(3) The set of characters as defined by [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] that is encoded in UCS-2.

Unicode character: Unless otherwise specified, a 16-bit UTF-16 code unit.

Unified Messaging: A set of components and services that enable voice, fax, and email messages to be stored in a user's mailbox and accessed from a variety of devices.

Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): A string that identifies a resource. The URI is the Web service addressing mechanism defined in Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax [RFC3986].

Uniform Resource Locator (URL): A string of characters in a standardized format that identifies a document or resource on the World Wide Web. The format is as specified in [RFC1738].

unique identifier (UID): A pair consisting of a GUID and a version sequence number to identify each resource uniquely. The UID is used to track the object for its entire lifetime through any number of times that the object is modified or renamed.

Universal Naming Convention (UNC): A string format that specifies the location of a resource. For more information, see [MS-DTYP] section 2.2.57.

universal serial bus (USB): An external bus that supports Plug and Play installation. It allows devices to be connected and disconnected without shutting down or restarting the computer.

universally unique identifier (UUID): A 128-bit value. UUIDs can be used for multiple purposes, from tagging objects with an extremely short lifetime, to reliably identifying very persistent objects in cross-process communication such as client and server interfaces, manager entry-point vectors, and RPC objects. UUIDs are highly likely to be unique. UUIDs are also known as a globally unique identifiers (GUIDs) and these terms are used interchangeably in the Microsoft protocol technical documents (TDs). Interchanging the usage of these terms does not imply or require a specific algorithm or mechanism to generate the UUID. Specifically, the use of this term does not imply or require that the algorithms described in [RFC4122] or [C706] must be used for generating the UUID.

unsendable attendee: An attendee to whom a meeting request or meeting update is not sent.

update: (1) An add, modify, or delete of one or more objects or attribute values. See originating update, replicated update.

(2) The combination of metadata and associated content for a software update. An update is identified by a GUID.

(3) The set of metadata pertaining to a file or file deletion. The main fields in an update consist of the unique identifier (UID), global version sequence number (GVSN), file name, file attributes, and flags indicating whether the update is for an existing file, or for a file deletion.

update server: A computer that implements the Windows Update Services: Server-Server Protocol or the Windows Server Update Services: Client-Server Protocol to provide updates to client computers and other update servers.

Use License: An XrML 1.2 license that authorizes a user to gain access to a protected content file and describes the applicable usage policies. Also referred to as "End-User License (EUL)."

use license (UL): An XrML 1.2 license that authorizes a user to access a given protected content file and describes the usage policies that apply. Also known as an "End-User License (EUL)".

user: (1) A person who employs a web browser requestor to access a WS resource.

(2) The real person who has a member account. The user is authenticated by being asked to prove knowledge of the secret password associated with the user name.

user agent: An HTTP user agent, as specified in [RFC2616].

user agent client (UAC): A logical entity that creates a new request, and then uses the client transaction state machinery to send it. The role of UAC lasts only for the duration of that transaction. In other words, if a piece of software initiates a request, it acts as a UAC for the duration of that transaction. If it receives a request later, it assumes the role of a user agent server (UAS) for the processing of that transaction.

user agent server (UAS): A logical entity that generates a response to a Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) request. The response either accepts, rejects, or redirects the request. The role of the UAS lasts only for the duration of that transaction. If a process responds to a request, it acts as a UAS for that transaction. If it initiates a request later, it assumes the role of a user agent client (UAC) for that transaction.

User Datagram Protocol (UDP): The connectionless protocol within TCP/IP that corresponds to the transport layer in the ISO/OSI reference model.

user object: An object of class user. A user object is a security principal object; the principal is a person or service entity running on the computer. The shared secret allows the person or service entity to authenticate itself, as described in ([MS-AUTHSOD] section 1.1.1.1).

user principal name (UPN): A user account name (sometimes referred to as the user logon name) and a domain name that identifies the domain in which the user account is located. This is the standard usage for logging on to a Windows domain. The format is:someone@example.com (in the form of an email address). In Active Directory, the userPrincipalName attribute (2) of the account object, as described in [MS-ADTS].

UTF-16: A standard for encoding Unicode characters, defined in the Unicode standard, in which the most commonly used characters are defined as double-byte characters. Unless specified otherwise, this term refers to the UTF-16 encoding form specified in [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] section 3.9.

UTF-16LE: The Unicode Transformation Format - 16-bit, Little Endian encoding scheme. It is used to encode Unicode characters as a sequence of 16-bit codes, each encoded as two 8-bit bytes with the least-significant byte first.

UTF-8: A byte-oriented standard for encoding Unicode characters, defined in the Unicode standard. Unless specified otherwise, this term refers to the UTF-8 encoding form specified in [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] section 3.9.

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