1.1 Glossary

This document uses the following terms:

address book: A collection of Address Book objects, each of which are contained in any number of address lists.

address type: An identifier for the type of email address, such as SMTP and EX.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI) character set: A character set defined by a code page approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The term "ANSI" as used to signify Windows code pages is a historical reference and a misnomer that persists in the Windows community. The source of this misnomer stems from the fact that the Windows code page 1252 was originally based on an ANSI draft, which became International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Standard 8859-1 [ISO/IEC-8859-1]. In Windows, the ANSI character set can be any of the following code pages: 1252, 1250, 1251, 1253, 1254, 1255, 1256, 1257, 1258, 874, 932, 936, 949, or 950. For example, "ANSI application" is usually a reference to a non-Unicode or code-page-based application. Therefore, "ANSI character set" is often misused to refer to one of the character sets defined by a Windows code page that can be used as an active system code page; for example, character sets defined by code page 1252 or character sets defined by code page 950. Windows is now based on Unicode, so the use of ANSI character sets is strongly discouraged unless they are used to interoperate with legacy applications or legacy data.

ASCII: The American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) is an 8-bit character-encoding scheme based on the English alphabet. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that work with text. ASCII refers to a single 8-bit ASCII character or an array of 8-bit ASCII characters with the high bit of each character set to zero.

Attachment object: A set of properties that represents a file, Message object, or structured storage that is attached to a Message object and is visible through the attachments table for a Message object.

big-endian: Multiple-byte values that are byte-ordered with the most significant byte stored in the memory location with the lowest address.

blind carbon copy (Bcc) recipient: An addressee on a Message object that is not visible to recipients of the Message object.

body part: A part of an Internet message, as described in [RFC2045].

carbon copy (Cc) recipient: An address on a Message object that is visible to recipients of the Message object but is not necessarily expected to take any action.

conversation thread: A series of messages and responses to those messages, typically related by subject.

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC): A high-precision atomic time standard that approximately tracks Universal Time (UT). It is the basis for legal, civil time all over the Earth. Time zones around the world are expressed as positive and negative offsets from UTC. In this role, it is also referred to as Zulu time (Z) and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). In these specifications, all references to UTC refer to the time at UTC-0 (or GMT).

delegate rule: A server-side rule that is used to send mail to delegates on behalf of a delegator.

delivery receipt: A report message that is generated and sent by a client or server to the sender of a message or another designated recipient when an email message is received by an intended recipient.

display name: A text string that is used to identify a principal or other object in the user interface. Also referred to as title.

distribution list: A collection of users, computers, contacts, or other groups that is used only for email distribution, and addressed as a single recipient.

Domain Name System (DNS): A hierarchical, distributed database that contains mappings of domain names (1) to various types of data, such as IP addresses. DNS enables the location of computers and services by user-friendly names, and it also enables the discovery of other information stored in the database.

Email object: A Message object that represents an email message in a message store and adheres to the property descriptions that are described in in [MS-OXOMSG].

Embedded Message object: A Message object that is stored as an Attachment object within another Message object.

entry ID: See EntryID.

EntryID: A sequence of bytes that is used to identify and access an object.

flags: A set of values used to configure or report options or settings.

folder associated information (FAI): A collection of Message objects that are stored in a Folder object and are typically hidden from view by email applications. An FAI Message object is used to store a variety of settings and auxiliary data, including forms, views, calendar options, favorites, and category lists.

Folder object: A messaging construct that is typically used to organize data into a hierarchy of objects containing Message objects and folder associated information (FAI) Message objects.

globally unique identifier (GUID): A term used interchangeably with universally unique identifier (UUID) in Microsoft protocol technical documents (TDs). Interchanging the usage of these terms does not imply or require a specific algorithm or mechanism to generate the value. Specifically, the use of this term does not imply or require that the algorithms described in [RFC4122] or [C706] must be used for generating the GUID. See also universally unique identifier (UUID).

handle: Any token that can be used to identify and access an object such as a device, file, or a window.

header: A name-value pair that supplies structured data in an Internet email message or MIME entity.

Help file: A file that contains the documentation for a specific product or technology.

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML): An application of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) that uses tags to mark elements in a document, as described in [HTML].

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP): An application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems (text, graphic images, sound, video, and other multimedia files) on the World Wide Web.

Internet Message Access Protocol - Version 4 (IMAP4): A protocol that is used for accessing email and news items from mail servers, as described in [RFC3501].

Inter-Personal Mail (IPM): Typical user messaging items, such as email and calendar items.

language code identifier (LCID): A 32-bit number that identifies the user interface human language dialect or variation that is supported by an application or a client computer.

little-endian: Multiple-byte values that are byte-ordered with the least significant byte stored in the memory location with the lowest address.

locale: A collection of rules and data that are specific to a language and a geographical area. A locale can include information about sorting rules, date and time formatting, numeric and monetary conventions, and character classification.

Logon object: A Server object that provides access to a private mailbox or a public folder. A client obtains a Logon object by issuing a RopLogon remote operation (ROP) to a server.

mail spooler: A program or function that receives requests to send mail to and deliver mail for a user. It determines which mail transport handles sending or receiving mail.

mailbox: A message store that contains email, calendar items, and other Message objects for a single recipient.

message body: The main message text of an email message. A few properties of a Message object represent its message body, with one property containing the text itself and others defining its code page and its relationship to alternative body formats.

message class: A property that loosely defines the type of a message, contact, or other Personal Information Manager (PIM) object in a mailbox.

Message object: A set of properties that represents an email message, appointment, contact, or other type of personal-information-management object. In addition to its own properties, a Message object contains recipient properties that represent the addressees to which it is addressed, and an attachments table that represents any files and other Message objects that are attached to it.

message store: A unit of containment for a single hierarchy of Folder objects, such as a mailbox or public folders.

message transfer agent (MTA): An SMTP server that accepts mail from a client or another MTA and delivers the mail or relays it to another MTA.

messaging object: An object that exists in a mailbox. It can be only a Folder object or a Message object.

messaging transport: A networking protocol that facilitates the transfer of messages between a messaging client and a messaging server.

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME): A set of extensions that redefines and expands support for various types of content in email messages, as described in [RFC2045], [RFC2046], and [RFC2047].

non-delivery report: A report message that is generated and sent by a server to the sender of a message if an email message could not be received by an intended recipient.

non-read receipt: A message that is generated when an email message is deleted at the expiration of a time limit or due to other client-specific criteria.

Object Linking and Embedding (OLE): A technology for transferring and sharing information between applications by inserting a file or part of a file into a compound document. The inserted file can be either embedded or linked. See also embedded object and linked object.

Out of Office (OOF): One of the possible values for the free/busy status on an appointment. It indicates that the user will not be in the office during the appointment.

permission: A rule that is associated with an object and that regulates which users can gain access to the object and in what manner. See also rights.

plain text: Text that does not have markup. See also plain text message body.

Post Office Protocol - Version 3 (POP3): A protocol that is used for accessing email from mail servers, as described in [RFC1939].

primary recipient: A person for whom a message is directly intended.

read receipt: An email message that is sent to the sender of a message to indicate that a message recipient received the message.

recipient: (1) An entity that can receive email messages. 

(2) An entity that is in an address list, can receive email messages, and contains a set of attributes (1). Each attribute has a set of associated values.

recipient table: The part of a Message object that represents users to whom a message is addressed. Each row of the table is a set of properties that represents one recipient (2).

reminder: A generally user-visible notification that a specified time has been reached. A reminder is most commonly related to the beginning of a meeting or the due time of a task but it can be applied to any object type.

remote operation (ROP): An operation that is invoked against a server. Each ROP represents an action, such as delete, send, or query. A ROP is contained in a ROP buffer for transmission over the wire.

remote procedure call (RPC): A context-dependent term commonly overloaded with three meanings. Note that much of the industry literature concerning RPC technologies uses this term interchangeably for any of the three meanings. Following are the three definitions: (*) The runtime environment providing remote procedure call facilities. The preferred usage for this meaning is "RPC runtime". (*) The pattern of request and response message exchange between two parties (typically, a client and a server). The preferred usage for this meaning is "RPC exchange". (*) A single message from an exchange as defined in the previous definition. The preferred usage for this term is "RPC message". For more information about RPC, see [C706].

report message: A message that presents status information about a sent message. A report message is sent to the sender of the message.

resend message: A message that is submitted for message delivery after it failed to be sent to all or some of its recipients (1).

Rich Text Format (RTF): Text with formatting as described in [MSFT-RTF].

ROP request: See ROP request buffer.

ROP request buffer: A ROP buffer that a client sends to a server to be processed.

ROP response: See ROP response buffer.

ROP response buffer: A ROP buffer that a server sends to a client to be processed.

search folder: A Folder object that provides a means of querying for items that match certain criteria. The search folder includes the search folder definition message and the search folder container.

search key: A binary-comparable key that identifies related objects for a search.

Sent Items folder: A special folder that is the default location for storing copies of Message objects after they are submitted or sent.

Server object: An object on a server that is used as input or created as output for remote operations (ROPs).

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP): A member of the TCP/IP suite of protocols that is used to transport Internet messages, as described in [RFC5321].

spam: An unsolicited email message.

spooler queue: A series of outgoing messages that are ready for delivery to recipients (1).

subobject: For a folder, the messages and subfolders that are contained in that folder. For a message, the recipients (2) and attachments to that message. For an attachment, the Embedded Message object for that attachment.

To recipient: See primary recipient.

Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF): A binary type-length-value encoding that is used to encode properties for transport, as described in [MS-OXTNEF].

Unicode: A character encoding standard developed by the Unicode Consortium that represents almost all of the written languages of the world. The Unicode standard [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] provides three forms (UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32) and seven schemes (UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16 BE, UTF-16 LE, UTF-32, UTF-32 LE, and UTF-32 BE).

Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): A string that identifies a resource. The URI is an addressing mechanism defined in Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax [RFC3986].

UTF-16: A standard for encoding Unicode characters, defined in the Unicode standard, in which the most commonly used characters are defined as double-byte characters. Unless specified otherwise, this term refers to the UTF-16 encoding form specified in [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] section 3.9.

UUEncoded attachment: A file that is attached to an email message that was encoded by using the uuencode utility, as described in [IEEE1003.1].

MAY, SHOULD, MUST, SHOULD NOT, MUST NOT: These terms (in all caps) are used as defined in [RFC2119]. All statements of optional behavior use either MAY, SHOULD, or SHOULD NOT.

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