1.1 Glossary

This document uses the following terms:

address type: An identifier for the type of email address, such as SMTP and EX.

Augmented Backus-Naur Form (ABNF): A modified version of Backus-Naur Form (BNF), commonly used by Internet specifications. ABNF notation balances compactness and simplicity with reasonable representational power. ABNF differs from standard BNF in its definitions and uses of naming rules, repetition, alternatives, order-independence, and value ranges. For more information, see [RFC5234].

binary large object (BLOB): A discrete packet of data that is stored in a database and is treated as a sequence of uninterpreted bytes.

body part: A part of an Internet message, as described in [RFC2045].

character set: (1) A mapping between the characters of a written language and the values that are used to represent those characters to a computer.

(2) The range of characters used to represent textual data within a MIME body part, as described in [RFC2046].

checksum: A value that is the summation of a byte stream. By comparing the checksums computed from a data item at two different times, one can quickly assess whether the data items are identical.

code page: An ordered set of characters of a specific script in which a numerical index (code-point value) is associated with each character. Code pages are a means of providing support for character sets and keyboard layouts used in different countries. Devices such as the display and keyboard can be configured to use a specific code page and to switch from one code page (such as the United States) to another (such as Portugal) at the user's request.

display name: A text string that is used to identify a principal or other object in the user interface. Also referred to as title.

email address: A string that identifies a user and enables the user to receive Internet messages.

encoding: A process that specifies a Content-Transfer-Encoding for transforming character data from one form to another.

EntryID: A sequence of bytes that is used to identify and access an object.

Internet Message Access Protocol - Version 4 (IMAP4): A protocol that is used for accessing email and news items from mail servers, as described in [RFC3501].

little-endian: Multiple-byte values that are byte-ordered with the least significant byte stored in the memory location with the lowest address.

message class: A property that loosely defines the type of a message, contact, or other Personal Information Manager (PIM) object in a mailbox.

Message object: A set of properties that represents an email message, appointment, contact, or other type of personal-information-management object. In addition to its own properties, a Message object contains recipient properties that represent the addressees to which it is addressed, and an attachments table that represents any files and other Message objects that are attached to it.

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME): A set of extensions that redefines and expands support for various types of content in email messages, as described in [RFC2045], [RFC2046], and [RFC2047].

named property: A property that is identified by both a GUID and either a string name or a 32-bit identifier.

non-delivery report: A report message that is generated and sent by a server to the sender of a message if an email message could not be received by an intended recipient.

plain text message body: A message body for which the Content-Type value of the Email Text Body header field is "text/plain". A plain text message body can be identified explicitly in the content, or implicitly if it is in a message that is as described in [RFC822] or a message that does not contain a Content-Type header field.

Post Office Protocol - Version 3 (POP3): A protocol that is used for accessing email from mail servers, as described in [RFC1939].

recipient: An entity that can receive email messages. 

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP): A member of the TCP/IP suite of protocols that is used to transport Internet messages, as described in [RFC5321].

Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF): A binary type-length-value encoding that is used to encode properties for transport, as described in [MS-OXTNEF].

Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) Reader: An entity that decodes a Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) structure after receiving a message, for the purpose of reconstructing the rich properties that are contained in the stream.

Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) Writer: An entity that encodes or builds a Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) structure for the purpose of transporting rich properties.

Unicode: A character encoding standard developed by the Unicode Consortium that represents almost all of the written languages of the world. The Unicode standard [UNICODE5.0.0/2007] provides three forms (UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32) and seven schemes (UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16 BE, UTF-16 LE, UTF-32, UTF-32 LE, and UTF-32 BE).

MAY, SHOULD, MUST, SHOULD NOT, MUST NOT: These terms (in all caps) are used as defined in [RFC2119]. All statements of optional behavior use either MAY, SHOULD, or SHOULD NOT.

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