2.5.2.5 Protocol-Specific Details

Using RPC

Logging on to a mailbox by using RPC

Figure 7: Logging on to a mailbox by using RPC

  1. The client uses the discovery process from the use case described in section 2.5.1 to identify the appropriate server.

  2. The client connects to the Exchange server via RPC and issues an EcDoConnectEx call, as described in [MS-OXCRPC] section 3.1.4.1, along with the client's version information.

  3. The Exchange server accepts the connection request and responds with the server version and other connection information.

  4. The client issues a EcDoRpcExt2 call that includes the RopLogon remote operation (ROP) request ([MS-OXCROPS] section 2.2.3.1) to attempt to log on to the mailbox DN.

  5. Upon successful logon, the Exchange server returns a list of special folder IDs, as described in [MS-OXCDATA] section 2.2.1.1, depending on the logon action requested by the client.

Using MAPI extensions for HTTP

Logging on to a mailbox by using MAPI extensions for HTTP

Figure 8: Logging on to a mailbox by using MAPI extensions for HTTP

  1. The client uses the discovery process from the use case described in section 2.5.1 to identify the appropriate server.

  2. The client connects to the Exchange server via MAPI extensions for HTTP and issues a Connect request type, as described in [MS-OXCMAPIHTTP] section 2.2.4.1, along with the client's version information.

  3. The Exchange server accepts the connection request and responds with the server version and other connection information.

  4. The client issues an Execute request type, as described in [MS-OXCMAPIHTTP] section 2.2.4.2, that includes the RopLogon remote operation (ROP) request ([MS-OXCROPS] section 2.2.3.1) to attempt to log on to the mailbox DN.

  5. Upon successful logon, the Exchange server returns a list of special folder IDs, as described in [MS-OXCDATA] section 2.2.1.1, depending on the logon action requested by the client.

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