2.5.13.5 Protocol-Specific Details

Using remote operations (ROPs)

Registering for and receiving notifications by using ROPs

Figure 36: Registering for and receiving notifications by using ROPs

Note The ROPs are sent via RPC or MAPI extensions for HTTP. Several ROPs can be batched into a single request, as described in [MS-OXCROPS].

  1. The client logs on to the mailbox per the use case described in section 2.5.2.

  2. The client issues a RopRegisterNotification ROP request ([MS-OXCROPS] section 2.2.14.1) to register for notifications. The FID, as described in [MS-OXCDATA] section 2.2.1.1, of the folder to be monitored is included in the request.

  3. The Exchange server responds with a handle to the notification.

  4. The next time that the client issues a ROP request to the Exchange server, the server adds a RopNotify ROP response ([MS-OXCROPS] section 2.2.14.2) and a result code of RopPending is returned for the overall ROP response.

  5. The client examines the information in the RopNotify ROP response and triggers an event on the client. For example, a UI notification is triggered in response to a link that was added to the body of a meeting invite.

Using Exchange ActiveSync

Registering for and receiving notifications by using Exchange ActiveSync

Figure 37: Registering for and receiving notifications by using Exchange ActiveSync

  1. The client issues a ping request to the Exchange server to check for events that have occurred in the specified list of containers (folders).

  2. If no events have occurred since the last ping, the Exchange server returns HTTP status code 200 (OK) and a status code of 1, as described in [MS-ASCMD]. If events have occurred, the server returns HTTP status code 200 (OK) and a status code of 2, followed by a list of FIDs that need to be synchronized.

Using Exchange Web Services

Registering for and receiving notifications by using Exchange Web Services

Figure 38: Registering for and receiving notifications by using Exchange Web Services

  1. The client uses the HTTPS/SOAP SubscribeSoapIn request, as described in [MS-OXWSNTIF] section 3.1.4.3.1.1, to subscribe to pull notifications for the types of events indicated in the EventTypes element on a list of folders specified by the FolderIds element.

  2. The Client Access server responds with a SubscribeSoapOut response, as described in [MS-OXWSNTIF] section 3.1.4.3.1.2, which includes a ResponseCode element, a SubscriptionId element that identifies this subscription, and a Watermark element that indicates the current notification state.

  3. A second client modifies the contents of a folder that has an active subscription. This causes the server to create a pending notification associated with the subscription.

  4. The first client uses the HTTPS/SOAP GetEventsSoapIn request, as described in [MS-OXWSNTIF] section 3.1.4.1.1.1, to query the server for any new notifications. The value of the Watermark element allows the server to determine which new notifications, if any, to return to the client.

  5. The Exchange Client Access server responds with a GetEventsSoapOut response, as described in [MS-OXWSNTIF] section 3.1.4.1.1.2, which includes a Notifications element listing the notifications that were pending since the value of the Watermark element specified by the client. A Watermark element is also returned to the client to indicate the new notification state for the next GetEventsSoapIn call.

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