Microsoft Project 2000 Resource Kit

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What's New in Installation
Basic Installation
Windows Terminal Services
Deployment with Systems Management Server
Managing a Successive Deployment
International Deployment
Supporting Traveling Users

Whether you administer Microsoft Project 2000 for a few users on a small local area network or for departments spread out across continents, you can use the information presented here to customize and install Microsoft Project. These topics cover a powerful and flexible set of tools and procedures that make your job of deploying Microsoft Project a much easier task.

What's New in Installation

With the use of the new Windows Installer technology and the new Profile and Custom Installation Wizards, the installation process for Microsoft Project 2000 has been significantly improved over previous versions of Microsoft Project.

Basic Installation

Microsoft Project 2000 provides you with the flexibility to customize and install Microsoft Project in a number of different ways. The simplest methods of installing a customized version of Microsoft Project include creating an administrative installation point on the network or distributing a customized version of the Microsoft Project CD.

Windows Terminal Services

Microsoft Project 2000 has been designed to work effectively with Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0, Terminal Server Edition and the Windows 2000 Terminal Services feature (Terminal Services). Terminal Services allows users to run Windows-based programs on computers that cannot run the latest versions of Windows. With Terminal Services, you can deploy Microsoft Project 2000 on the server and have users run Microsoft Project over the network.

Deployment with Systems Management Server

Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) is a powerful software package that can be used to assess your computing environment and to deploy new software. You can deploy Microsoft Project 2000 and many other applications with SMS by creating Systems Management Server packages and distributing them to selected clients. New wizards and other enhancements make it easy to deploy multiple applications with Systems Management Server version 2.0.

Managing a Successive Deployment

The applications and tools included with Microsoft Project 2000 provide a wide range of functionality for users. Related products include analysis tools and plug-in language features that are available in the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.

You can install these applications and tools on users' computers at the same time that you deploy Microsoft Project, or you can stagger the deployment and install them when and where you need them.

International Deployment

You can deploy and maintain a single version of Microsoft Project 2000 throughout your multinational organization. The plug-in language features of Microsoft Project allow users in foreign subsidiaries to continue working in their own languages.

Supporting Traveling Users

Microsoft Project 2000 makes it easier than ever to support users who travel between computers on a network. With new installation options and an improved model for storing user preferences, users can travel and take their Microsoft Project 2000 documents and settings with them.

What's New in Installation

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The installation process for Microsoft Project 2000 has been significantly improved over previous versions of Microsoft Project. The following topics describe aspects of the new installation process.

Windows Installer Replaces Acme Setup

Previous versions of Microsoft Project used Acme Setup for installation. Acme Setup relied on tables of information in text files to copy program files, set registry entries, and perform other tasks necessary for installing Microsoft Project on a user's computer.

Microsoft Project 2000 Setup uses the new Windows Installer technology. This technology provides a number of benefits over Acme Setup.

Logically grouped features and components   When a user selects a feature to install during Microsoft Project 2000 Setup, the Installer identifies a corresponding set of components to copy to the user's computer. Each component consists of files, programs, dynamic-link libraries (DLLs), and registry entries that work together as a unit. This more efficient management of resources also makes customizing installations a simpler task for an administrator.

Install features when required   When you select this option for a feature or application, the Installer does not copy the corresponding components during installation. However, the first time that a user starts the feature or application, the Installer automatically copies the necessary components to the user's computer. This option saves disk space on the user's computer until features are actually needed.

Resilient components   The Installer maintains a record of all components installed on the computer. If a file or registry entry is deleted or corrupted after installation, then the Installer automatically reinstalls the component from the installation source.

Efficient customization process   All the data and instructions used during Setup are stored in a Windows Installer package (MSI file). To customize the installation process, you use the Custom Installation Wizard to record changes to the master installation in a Windows Installer transform (MST file). Because the original package is never altered, you can create a different transform for every installation scenario you need.

Installing Microsoft Project 2000 more efficiently with a Windows Installer package

The Windows Installer package is a relational database that replaces the Acme Setup STF and INF text files. The package contains all the information necessary to install Microsoft Project 2000. The database associates product components with features and contains information about the installation process itself, such as installation sequence, destination folder paths, system dependencies, and installation options.

After installation, the Installer continues to use the package to add or remove components, replace missing or damaged files, or install new components on first use.

Customizing Microsoft Project 2000 with a Windows Installer transform

The Windows Installer transform describes how to transform the package so that Setup installs Microsoft Project 2000 the way you want. Like the package, the transform is a relational database with information about components, features, and Setup properties. But the transform contains only the changes that you want to apply to the package.

To customize the Microsoft Project 2000 installation, you no longer need to directly edit the MSI file the way you had to edit the Acme STF file. Instead, you use the Custom Installation Wizard to create a new transform with all the changes you want to make to the Microsoft Project installation. When you run Setup with both the package and the transform, the Installer applies the transform to the original package, and Setup uses your altered configuration to perform the installation.

The Installer does not change the package itself; but only temporarily applies the changes in memory before carrying out the package instructions. There's no worry about corrupting the original file. The transform is typically much smaller than the package, so you can easily create multiple custom installations by creating multiple transforms to use with the default package.

See also

Microsoft Project Setup takes full advantage of the improved features of the Windows Installer. For more information about Microsoft Project Setup, see "Setup Program" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

The Custom Installation Wizard provides great flexibility in customizing the Microsoft Project installation process. For more information about the changes that you can make during Microsoft Project Setup, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Intelligent Installation

In Microsoft Project 98, you had three options when deploying Microsoft Project throughout an organization:

  • Install Microsoft Project on users' computers so that users can run the applications locally.

  • Leave Microsoft Project on the source (network or CD-ROM), and run the applications over the network.

  • Omit rarely needed components from the installation.

Microsoft Project 2000 Setup offers much more flexibility. You can install exactly what you need — exactly when you need it.

Installing the features you want

In Microsoft Project 2000, the Windows Installer technology allows you to choose different installation states for different features. For example, you can install Microsoft Project locally and leave Microsoft Project Help on the server.

Installing files when you need them

In Microsoft Project 2000, you can select an additional installation option: Installed on First Use. If you select this option, the files that make up a feature are not physically installed on a user's computer until the user actually needs the feature.

For example, you can install Microsoft Project program files to run from the user's hard disk, and you can set the Microsoft Project Help files to be installed on first use. Setup does not copy the Help files to the user's computer during installation, but instead the Installer records where the Help files are located if they are ever needed.

The first time that the user clicks Help to look for information, Microsoft Project prompts the Installer to copy the Help files to the user's hard disk. After the files are installed, the command proceeds normally. The user might notice a small delay the first time that the command is used.

The main advantage of this option is that you do not need to configure the installation ahead of time with exactly the features your users might need. Instead, this option leaves open multiple possibilities. Installing features on first use not only saves disk space on users' computers but also makes your initial Microsoft Project installation run much more quickly.

Reinstalling files automatically

Because Microsoft Project 2000 Setup uses the new Windows Installer technology, Microsoft Project works with the Installer to keep track of files on the user's computer. When a user chooses a Microsoft Project command, the Installer finds the files in the original source location (on the user's computer, CD-ROM, or the network) and runs them.

If a file is accidentally deleted or becomes corrupt, the Installer detects this condition and retrieves a new copy of the file from the installation source on the network or Microsoft Project CD-ROM. This repair process happens automatically, without the user's intervention and without the application failures that might otherwise occur.

Users can also perform this function manually by using the Detect and Repair command (Help menu) in Microsoft Project 2000. This command checks all Microsoft Project files associated with the application. If any files are missing or corrupted, new copies of the files are restored from the installation source.

See also

Microsoft Project 2000 Setup has a number of features that make installing Microsoft Project easier and more flexible than previous versions of Microsoft Project. For more information about Microsoft Project Setup, see "Setup Program" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

New Custom Installation Wizard

To customize the installation process in previous versions of Microsoft Project, you used the Network Installation Wizard to modify the text files used by Acme Setup — a complex and labor-intensive undertaking. In Microsoft Project 2000, new tools make this process much more efficient and flexible.

The Custom Installation Wizard works with the new Windows Installer technology. The choices you make in the Custom Installation Wizard are recorded in a Windows Installer transform (MST file). When you run the transform with the Windows Installer package (MSI file), your modifications to the standard installation process are carried out.

Because the original package file remains unchanged, you can create as many different transforms as you wish — which means you can use the wizard to create unique installations of Microsoft Project for every department in your organization.

Customizing Microsoft Project more precisely

The functionality, flexibility, and user interface of the Custom Installation Wizard represent a great improvement over the Network Installation Wizard. The Custom Installation Wizard has been expanded to include new features and extensive online Help.

Unlike the Network Installation Wizard, the new installation technologies in Microsoft Project 2000 allow you to customize many more aspects of the installation process. By using the Custom Installation Wizard, you can:

  • Set installation options for individual Microsoft Project features, rather than having to set one option for the entire product.

  • Hide selected options from users during Setup.

  • Add custom files and registry keys to the installation.

  • Customize desktop shortcuts for Microsoft Project.

  • Set default user options.

Customizing applications beyond Microsoft Project 

The Custom Installation Wizard you use to customize Microsoft Project 2000 is the same tool that you use to customize Office. The Custom Installation Wizard can be used with any product that uses the Windows Installer Technology. You can download the Custom Installation Wizard from the Office Resource Kit Web site. Note that, while the instructions in the Custom Installation Wizard specify its use with Office, it is designed to work with Microsoft Project 2000 as well.

The Custom Installation Wizard takes advantage of other Microsoft Project customization tools as well. For example, you can include a Microsoft Project profile settings (OPS) file that you create with the Profile Wizard to preset user options for Microsoft Project. You can also run the Microsoft Internet Explorer Administration Kit from within the Custom Installation Wizard to customize the way that Microsoft Project Setup installs Internet Explorer 5.

See also

The Custom Installation Wizard makes it easy to customize the Microsoft Project installation process as well as the user's computer. For more information about using the Custom Installation Wizard, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

New Profile Wizard

The new Microsoft Profile Wizard helps you upgrade your users to Microsoft Project 2000 with standard settings across your organization.

Specifying standard user settings

When you upgrade to a new version of a software application, it helps if everyone in your organization can begin learning the application with the same options and settings. Having a consistent base for training can cut down on support costs, especially in the early stages of the conversion process.

There has never been an easy way to install Microsoft Project with standard settings across an entire organization — until now. In Microsoft Project 2000, the Profile Wizard helps you create and distribute a default user profile, including standard locations for files and templates. You can preset options so that users don't have to customize anything.

By using the Profile Wizard, you can also change default values to match your organization's needs or to ensure that users have access to shared templates. When you deploy a standard user profile, all of your users start with the same Microsoft Project configuration, and you can be sure of a smoother transition.

Storing and retrieving user settings

Organizations today face the challenge of keeping users up and running, with a minimum of downtime. One way that you can dull the pain of events like a computer upgrade or a hardware failure is by using user profiles.

By using the new Profile Wizard, you can store most Microsoft Project 2000 user settings. Users can back up their settings and restore them to a new computer — and get back to work more quickly, without any noticeable change in their work environment.

Using the Profile Wizard

The Profile Wizard you use to capture and restore Microsoft Project settings is the same Profile Wizard provided in from the Office Resource Kit Web site, and it can be used with Office as well as Microsoft Project. Note that, while the instructions in the Profile Wizard specify its use with Office, it is designed to work with Microsoft Project 2000 as well. When you use the Profile Wizard with Microsoft Project, you need to use a different .ini file. See the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox for more information. Depending on the .ini file you use you can use the Profile Wizard to capture and restore just Microsoft Project settings or Microsoft Project and Office settings. 

See also

You can use the Profile Wizard with the Custom Installation Wizard to distribute a standard Microsoft Project user profile to your users during installation. For more information about creating a standard user profile, see "Profile Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

To minimize the amount of tweaking that users can do, consider using system policies to set certain Microsoft Project 2000 options. For more information, see "System Policies" in Part 4 – Management and Support of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Better International Deployment Design

Microsoft Project 2000 combines support for all languages in a single product. Previously, international organizations had to install a separate version of Microsoft Project in each country. When you use Microsoft Project 2000, you will be able to deploy Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack around the world and use plug-in language features to run applications in local languages.

Installing a single version of Microsoft Project across your multinational organization will simplify the tasks of deploying, administering, and supporting Microsoft Project. This design will also benefit users by letting them choose a familiar language when they create documents, view online Help, or work with the user interface.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project includes five languages: German, Japanese, French, Italian, and Spanish. Other languages will be available only as language-specific versions of Microsoft Project and not within the MultiLanguage Pack.

The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.

Administering one multilingual installation

Installations of Microsoft Project 2000 will look and behave alike, no matter where they are installed. Anyone anywhere in your international organization can open, display, edit, or print documents created by anyone else in the organization, provided the operating system supports display and input of the language.

For example, you can standardize your organization on English as the user interface language. If some users need to edit text in Japanese, however, the user interface will provide tools for Asian text layout. Users will also be able to view online Help in their own language, even if the user interface is displayed in English to match the product documentation.

A single multilingual installation of Microsoft Project 2000 will offer new flexibility to users who travel or who work in more than one language:

  • Users who travel to an office in another country will be able to run Microsoft Project in their own language.

  • Multilingual users or users who share a computer with someone who speaks a different language will be able to switch the user interface or online Help language.

Customizing for local environments

You will be able to customize Microsoft Project at deployment by specifying languages for the Microsoft Project user interface, online Help, and editing tools. Language-specific features in Microsoft Project 2000 will be available according to the languages that you specify during installation or that users specify after installation.

In addition to specifying languages in Microsoft Project, you will also have to install the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack. The MultiLanguage Pack contains the files necessary to run the Microsoft Project user interface and online Help in a number of languages. It also includes tools, such as spelling and grammar checkers, for many languages.

The MultiLanguage Pack has a Setup program for each language that is separate from Microsoft Project, and the installation is customized to meet the needs of different international users.

Localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 are still available

Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack is an international core on top of which you can run language features from the MultiLanguage Pack. However, the MultiLanguage Pack doesn't include plug-in language features for all languages.

If your users need to run completely localized software, you will be able to deploy localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 and still have the advantage of a shared file format. Users can share documents seamlessly between the localized versions and Microsoft Project with MultiLanguage Pack.

Setting localized versions of Microsoft Project to English

If you have a Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, or Hebrew version of Microsoft Project and you want to see an English version of the user interface, you will be able to install and use the Microsoft Project English Language Pack. The English Language Pack will be shipped with the Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, and Hebrew versions of Microsoft Project 2000. It will allow you to set these language interfaces back to English.

Localized versions of Microsoft Project Central

You can also deploy and maintain a single version of Microsoft Project Central throughout your multinational organization. This can be useful if you want to install an English version of Microsoft Project Central, while supporting German or Japanese users viewing and entering information in their native languages.

Microsoft Project Central Language Packs for the following languages are currently available from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

  • LPK1: German, French, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Korean

  • LPK2: Swedish, Danish, Brazilian Portugese, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Hebrew

  • LPK3: Dutch, Czech, Polish, Finnish, and Norwegian 

The language packs include files for displaying the Microsoft Project Central user interface and online Help in different languages. For administrators, this functionality means that you can deploy a single version of Microsoft Project Central to all users, regardless of their language-speaking area. Then you can customize the installation to include local language capabilities or allow users to select their own language settings.

To learn more about localized versions of Microsoft Project Central, see "Deploying Multilanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

See also

If your organization is international, you can to take advantage of the international features of Microsoft Project 2000. For more information, see "Overview of International Features" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

It is easy to deploy Microsoft Project to international groups of users. To learn how, see "International Deployment" in this article.

Basic Installation

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Microsoft Project 2000 provides you with the flexibility to customize and install Microsoft Project in a number of different ways. The simplest methods of installing a customized version of Microsoft Project include creating an administrative installation point on the network or distributing a customized version of the Microsoft Project CD.

Installing from a Network Server

The most common method of deploying a customized version of Microsoft Project 2000 to a large number of users is to create a central copy of Microsoft Project on a network server. Then users can install Microsoft Project on their computers over the network. This method provides a number of advantages over having users install Microsoft Project individually from the Microsoft Project 2000 CD:

  • You can manage one set of Microsoft Project files from a central location.

  • You can create a standard set of Microsoft Project features and options for all users.

  • You can take advantage of flexible installation options, such as setting features to be installed on first use.

  • You have more control when you upgrade Microsoft Project in the future.

When you install Microsoft Project from a network server, you first create an administrative installation point and customize your version of Microsoft Project Setup. Then you run Setup on users' computers.

Create an administrative installation point

The administrative installation point is a server share that contains all of the Microsoft Project files. Users connect to the share and run Setup to install Microsoft Project on their computers.

To create an administrative installation point for Microsoft Project 

  1. Create a share on a network server for the administrative installation point.

    The network share must have at least 204 megabytes (MB) of available disk space.

  2. On a computer running Microsoft Windows 95/98, Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, or Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional that has write access to the share, connect to the server share.

  3. On the Start menu, click Run, and then click Browse.

  4. On the Microsoft Project CD in the CD-ROM drive, select setup.exe and click Open.

  5. On the command line following setup.exe, type /a install.msi and click OK.

    For example:

    e:\setup.exe /a install.msi 

  6. When prompted by Setup, enter the organization name that you want to define for all users who install Microsoft Project from this location.

  7. When prompted for the installation location, enter the server and share you created.

Setup copies all the files from the Microsoft Project CD to the network server, creating a hierarchy of folders in the root folder of the share. Setup also modifies the Windows Installer package for Microsoft Project (install.msi), identifying the network share as an administrative installation point. After you create the administrative installation point, you make the share available to users by providing them with read access.

If you need multiple administrative installation points from which users can install Microsoft Project, then you can run Setup again for each administrative installation point. Alternatively, you can copy the complete folder hierarchy and files from one administrative installation point to multiple servers. If you copy the folders, then each new administrative installation point you create has the same default organization name that you specified in Setup.

When users run Setup to install Microsoft Project, any Microsoft Project features that are installed to run from the network use this administrative installation point as the source of Microsoft Project files, and Microsoft Project runs the features over the network from this server. Similarly, for features that are set to be installed on first use, Microsoft Project copies files from this server when needed. If you install features in one of these two states, then you must keep this network server available to your users.

Customize Setup

Before users run Setup to install Microsoft Project, you can modify the administrative installation point to customize the installation process and default settings. You have three options for customizing Setup:

  • Create a custom command line.

  • Edit the Setup settings file.

  • Create a Windows Installer transform (MST file) by using the Microsoft Custom Installation Wizard.

Create a custom command line

Setup command-line options allow you to define properties that Setup uses to control the installation process. You can also specify whether Setup runs interactively or in quiet mode (without user interaction). Users install Microsoft Project on their computers by running Setup with your command-line options.

You have several options for distributing command-line options to users:

  • You can document the command-line options and have users enter them on the command line when they run Setup.

  • You can create a batch file that runs Setup with the options you choose.

  • You can run Setup for your users (for example, through a network logon script or through a systems management service) and specify your own command-line options.

For example, you can run Setup in quiet mode, specify a unique organization name, and restart when the installation is complete by entering the following command line:

    setup /qn REBOOT="Force" COMPANYNAME="Your Company Name"
Edit the Setup settings file

The Setup settings file (Setup.ini) is a text file in which you enter properties and values. You can edit the Setup settings file to specify the same properties as you do on the Setup command line — every command-line option has a corresponding setting in the settings file.

The advantage of modifying the Setup settings file is that your custom values are used whenever a user runs Setup from the administrative installation point with no command-line options.

For example, you can run Setup quietly, specify a unique organization name, and restart when the installation is complete by adding these lines to the settings file:

    [MSI]
    MSI=install.msi
    [Display]
    Display=None
    [Options]
    REBOOT=Force
    COMPANYNAME=YourCompanyName

You can create more than one settings file with different values, and then you can specify which settings file you want to use with the /settings command-line option. For example:

    setup.exe /settings newsetup.ini
Create a transform by using the Custom Installation Wizard

The Custom Installation Wizard allows you to specify the same property settings that you can define on the command line or in the settings file, but the wizard also allows you to make many more customizations.

For example, you can select the Microsoft Project features that you want to install, modify shortcuts, customize options for Microsoft Internet Explorer 5, and even add your own custom files to the installation. The wizard saves your selections in a transform.

When you run Setup, you need to specify the transform that you want Setup to use. You can specify an MST file on the Setup command line, or you can set the TRANSFORMS property in the Setup settings file.

For example, this command line specifies the transform Custom.mst:

    setup.exe TRANSFORMS="Custom.mst"

In the settings file, these lines specify the same transform:

    [Options]
    TRANSFORMS=Custom.mst

Caution   Do not alter anything in the administrative installation point other than editing the settings file or adding a transform. Setup relies on the folder hierarchy and files to remain as they are when the administrative installation point is created.

Run Setup on user's computers

After you create and customize the administrative installation point, users can install Microsoft Project by running Setup from the root folder of the server share. Users can run Setup themselves by using the command-line options, settings file, or transform that you have chosen. For a more controlled installation, you can run Setup for them through a network logon script or systems management software, such as Microsoft Systems Management Server.

See also

For a complete description of how to use Microsoft Project Setup to create an administrative installation point from which users can install Microsoft Project, see "Creating an Administrative Installation Point" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project Setup allows you to customize how Microsoft Project is installed by modifying the command line or the settings file. For more information, including a complete description of command-line options and the settings file, see "Customizing Setup" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

For more advanced customizations, use the Microsoft Project Custom Installation Wizard to alter the installation process. For more information, see "Customizing Feature Installation" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project Setup works well with systems management software, giving you greater flexibility in deploying Microsoft Project in your organization. For information about using Microsoft Systems Management Server to install Microsoft Project, see "Deployment with Systems Management Server" in this article.

Installing from a Custom CD-ROM

If you have users who cannot install or run Microsoft Project 2000 over the network, you can still create a customized version of for them by modifying and distributing a custom copy of the Microsoft Project 2000 CD. This option requires that you have the capability to create and distribute CD-ROMs.

Important   You must obtain the proper user licenses before copying, modifying, or distributing a customized version of the Microsoft Project CD. For more information about licensing, see your Microsoft reseller.

The process of customizing Microsoft Project CD is similar to the process of customizing an administrative installation point. First, you edit the Setup settings file or create a Microsoft Windows Installer transform (MST file) to use with Setup. However, instead of customizing an administrative installation point on the network, you copy the contents of the Microsoft Project CD to your hard disk. After modifying the Microsoft Project installation with your settings, you save and distribute copies of your custom CD-ROM to your users.

Copy the Microsoft Project CD to your hard disk

Select a folder on your hard disk with at least 204 MB of free space, and copy the complete folder hierarchy and files from the Microsoft Project CD to the folder. This step creates an exact copy of the CD-ROM contents. You can customize this copy before using it to create custom copies of the Microsoft Project CD.

Note   The folder structure that you copy from the Microsoft Project CD to your hard disk is nearly identical to the folder structure created by Setup when you create an administrative installation point. However, users cannot perform a network installation from the CD-ROM image. To create a valid administrative installation point, you must use Setup with the /a option.

Customize Setup

When users insert the Microsoft Project CD into a CD-ROM drive, Microsoft Windows uses the Autorun.inf file to run Setup.exe from the CD-ROM. Users can also double-click Setup.exe on the CD-ROM. You can modify your copy of the CD-ROM files on disk to customize the way that Setup.exe installs Microsoft Project.

You have two options for customizing the way that Microsoft Project is installed when users run Setup from your custom Microsoft Project CD-ROM:

  • Edit the Setup settings file.

  • Create a transform by using the Custom Installation Wizard.

Edit the Setup settings file

You edit the Setup settings file (Setup.ini) to define properties that Microsoft Project Setup uses to control the installation process. You can also specify whether Setup runs interactively or quietly. Setup uses the property values that you define in the settings file and alters the installation process accordingly.

For example, you can run Setup quietly, specify a unique organization name, and restart when the installation is complete by adding these lines to the settings file:

    [MSI]
    MSI=install.msi
    [Display]
    Display=None
    [Options]
    REBOOT=Force
    COMPANYNAME=Your Company Name

Create a transform by using the Custom Installation Wizard

The Custom Installation Wizard allows you to specify the same property settings that you can define on the command line or in the settings file, but the wizard also allows you to make many more customizations.

For example, you can select the Microsoft Project features that you want to install, modify shortcuts, customize options for Microsoft Internet Explorer 5, and even add your own custom files to the installation. The wizard saves your selections in a transform.

When you run Setup, you specify the transform that you want Setup to use by setting the TRANSFORMS property in the Setup settings file. For example, these lines specify the transform Custom.mst:

    [Options]
    TRANSFORMS=Custom.mst

This transform file must exist in the same folder as the setup settings file.

Caution   Do not alter anything in the files that you copied from the Microsoft Project CD to the hard disk other than editing the settings file or adding a transform. Setup relies on the folder hierarchy and files to remain as they are on the Microsoft Project CD.

Copy and distribute your custom CD-ROM

After you have customized your copy of the CD-ROM on disk, you can use this copy to create CD-ROMs for your users. The CD-ROM that you create can be used in the same way as the original Microsoft Project CD, except that Setup runs with your modifications.

See also

Microsoft Project Setup allows you to customize how Microsoft Project is installed by modifying the Setup settings file. For more information, including a complete description of settings file options, see "Customizing Setup" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

For more advanced customizations, use the Custom Installation Wizard to create a transform to alter the installation process. For more information, see "Customizing Feature Installation" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Including Microsoft Project on a Hard Disk Image

Some organizations deploy a complete user system at one time, including Microsoft Windows software, device drivers, application software, and custom configurations. In this scenario, you install the entire system onto a test computer, and then you create an image of the hard disk to copy to users' computers.

You can deploy a customized version of Microsoft Project 2000 with the system. Before you make the hard disk image, you install and configure Microsoft Project on the test computer. You can select the Microsoft Project features you want users to have, and you can preset any application options your users need. Users who receive the disk image begin with Microsoft Project preconfigured based on your test installation.

Install Microsoft Project

After you have installed and configured all the system software on the test computer, run Microsoft Project Setup to install Microsoft Project. Set the NOUSERNAME property on the Setup command line so that a user name is not defined during installation. This step allows users to enter their own user names the first time they run Microsoft Project.

To install Microsoft Project on the test computer 

  1. On the Start menu, click Run.

  2. Enter the file name and path of Microsoft Project Setup, and set the NOUSERNAME property on the command line.

    For example, to run Setup from the Microsoft Project CD in drive E, enter the following command:

    e:\setup.exe NOUSERNAME=True

If you plan to install all Microsoft Project features to run from the local hard disk, except for those features you choose to make unavailable, you can install Microsoft Project directly from the Microsoft Project CD. However, if you want to install some features to run from the network, or if you want to set some features to be installed on first use, then you must install Microsoft Project from an administrative installation point. All users who receive the disk image use this administrative installation point as their primary server.

Configure Microsoft Project

After you install Microsoft Project on the test computer, you can customize the Microsoft Project configuration for your users. For example, you can set the default file save format for Microsoft Project, or you can customize the toolbars and menus. After you configure Microsoft Project and distribute the disk image, your users have the customized version of Microsoft Project ready to run on their computers.

There are two methods you can use to configure Microsoft Project on the test computer. If you want to set only simple options for Microsoft Project, use the System Policy Editor with the Microsoft Project policy template. If you want to customize options that are not available in the policy template, such as custom toolbar items or custom menu items, run Microsoft Project on a second test computer, configure Microsoft Project directly, and save the configuration with the Profile Wizard.

Configure Microsoft Project with the System Policy Editor

To customize user settings, you can use the Microsoft Project policy template included in this Microsoft Project 2000 Resource Kit. The Microsoft Project policy template allows you to set and control the options available in the Options dialog box (Tools menu) in Microsoft Project. In addition to creating a system policy file to control user options across a network, the System Policy Editor also allows you to use the policy template to modify the Windows registry on the local computer.

To set Microsoft Project options with the System Policy Editor 

  1. Start the System Policy Editor on the test computer.

  2. Download the policy template (project9.adm) for Microsoft Project from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

  3. On the Options menu, click Policy Template, and then click Add.

  4. Browse to the location where you installed the Microsoft Project policy template, select the template, click Open, and then click OK.

  5. On the File menu, click Open Registry to open the local Windows registry.

  6. Modify policy values to set Microsoft Project options on the test computer.

  7. On the File menu, click Save. The values that you modify are written to the Windows registry on the test computer.

  8. On the File menu, click Exit.

Configure Microsoft Project with the Profile Wizard

To configure Microsoft Project options that are not available through policy templates, you can configure Microsoft Project on a second test computer and then use the Profile Wizard to copy your Microsoft Project configuration to the original test computer where you are building the hard disk image. Your choices are replicated for every user who installs Microsoft Project from the hard disk image.

Note   Do not run Microsoft Project on the test computer where you are building the hard disk image. The first time you run Microsoft Project after installing Microsoft Project, you are prompted for a user name. If you run Microsoft Project on the original test computer, the user name you enter is saved in the disk image you create from that computer. By default, all users who run Microsoft Project from the disk image are given the name you enter.

To configure Microsoft Project with the Profile Wizard 

  1. On a second test computer, install Microsoft Project 2000 in the same way you installed Microsoft Project on the original test computer.

  2. Run Microsoft Project on the second test computer to set options, customize toolbars and menus, and so forth.

  3. Download the appropriate .ini files for using the Profile Wizard with Microsoft Project from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

    You can use the Projprof.ini file to capture only Microsoft Project settings (settings shared with Office, such as the Office Assistant settings, will not be captured).

    Or you can use the Offcprof.ini file to capture Microsoft Project settings as well as Office settings (this makes sense if you are deploying Office and Microsoft Project at the same time).

  4. Run the Profile Wizard from the command line. From the directory where you installed the Profile Wizard (the default directory is Program Files\ORK Tools\Toolbox\Tools\Office Profile Wizard), type the following:

    Proflwiz.exe [[/s] <settings filename>] [/i <INI filename>] 

    where the settings file name is the name for the OPS file you want to create, and the INI file name is either Projprof.ini or Offcprof.ini.

  5. Run the Profile Wizard on the original test computer.

    You can either run the wizard from the Start menu or from the command line using the command:

    Proflwiz.exe [[/r] <settings filename>] 

    where the settings file name is the name of the OPS file to restore from.

After the Profile Wizard copies the Microsoft Project configuration to the original test computer, you can create the hard disk image from that computer. Your Microsoft Project configuration is replicated to every user who runs Microsoft Project from the hard disk image.

Create multiple hard disk images

If you need to create a set of different disk images, but you want to use the same Microsoft Project configuration for each image, you can install and configure Microsoft Project separately on each test computer. Or you can use the following method to duplicate your original Microsoft Project installation.

To create identical Microsoft Project installations for multiple hard disk images 

  1. Create an administrative installation point on the network.

  2. By using the Custom Installation Wizard, customize the administrative installation point and record your settings in a Windows installer transform (MST file).

  3. Install Microsoft Project on one test computer from the administrative installation point.

  4. On the test computer, run Microsoft Project and modify application settings.

  5. By using the Profile Wizard, save your application settings in an Microsoft Project profile settings (OPS) file.

  6. By using the Custom Installation Wizard, include the OPS file in the transform on the administrative installation point.

  7. Run Setup on each test computer with the modified transform.

    For example, to run Setup quietly with the transform Newsetup.mst, enter the following command line:

    setup.exe /qb TRANSFORMS=Newsetup.mst

Each computer on which you run Setup in this way has an identical installation of Microsoft Project.

See also

For a complete description of how to use Microsoft Project Setup to create an administrative installation point from which users can install Microsoft Project, see "Creating an Administrative Installation Point" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project Setup allows you to customize how Microsoft Project is installed by modifying the Setup settings file. For more information, including a complete description of settings file options, see "Customizing Setup" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

For more advanced customizations, use the Custom Installation Wizard to alter the installation process. For more information, see "Customizing Feature Installation" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Windows Terminal Services

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Microsoft Project 2000 has been designed to work effectively with Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0, Terminal Server Edition and the Windows 2000 Terminal Services feature (Terminal Services). Terminal Services allows users to run Windows-based programs on computers that cannot run the latest versions of Windows. With Terminal Services, you can deploy Microsoft Project 2000 on the server and have users run Microsoft Project over the network.

Using Microsoft Project 2000 with Terminal Services

Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0, Terminal Server Edition and the Microsoft Windows 2000 Terminal Services feature (Terminal Services) provide a thin-client solution in which Windows-based programs are executed on the server and remotely displayed on the client. If your users have computers with limited disk space, memory, or processing speed, you can install Microsoft Project 2000 to run in this environment.

Important   If you are using Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Terminal Server Edition, you must install Service Pack 4 on the server before installing Microsoft Project 2000. You can obtain Service Pack 4 from the Microsoft Windows Update for Windows NT Server Web site.

With Terminal Services, you install a single copy of Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer. Instead of running Microsoft Project locally on their hard disks, multiple users can connect to the server and run Microsoft Project from there.

Toolbox   Because of the special requirements for running Microsoft Project in a Terminal Services environment, you must use the transform provided in this Resource Kit to install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer. Microsoft Project Setup does not install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer without this transform. For information about downloading TermSrvr.mst, see the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

The following is an overview of how you use Microsoft Project with Terminal Services:

  1. The administrator installs a single copy of Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer.

  2. Users install Windows Terminal Client on their computers.

  3. Users log on to the Terminal Services computer, start Windows, and run Microsoft Project from within the Windows session.

  4. Microsoft Project runs on the Terminal Services computer, and only the Windows display is transmitted to users' computers.

In the Terminal Services environment, Microsoft Project 2000 separates application and user data, and uses environmental information supplied by Terminal Services. This arrangement allows multiple Terminal Client users to run Microsoft Project from the same installation.

To improve performance in the Terminal Services environment, certain functions in Microsoft Project will not function in order to reduce the amount of network traffic necessary to update the user's display. For example, in the Terminal Services environment, Microsoft Project displays a text-based splash screen, rather than the standard graphics-based screen — the text-based screen is displayed faster.

Tip   You can improve the performance of Microsoft Project in a Terminal Services environment even more by reducing the amount of incidental display information transmitted over the network. For example, select the Office Logo Office Assistant, which uses the least amount of animation, and set application options that eliminate menu or cursor animations. Or install the Motionless Office Assistant from the Office Resource Kit Web site.

Installation for the Terminal Services Environment

You install Microsoft Project 2000 from the Microsoft Project CD on a server running Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Services Edition, or Windows 2000 Terminal Services in much the same way you install Microsoft Project on a client computer. With some careful planning and a few modifications, Microsoft Project performs well in the Terminal Services environment.

To run Microsoft Project 2000 in this environment, follow these steps: 

  1. Customize the Terminal Services transform (MST file).

  2. Install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer.

  3. Set the Microsoft Project settings for Terminal Client users.

Running Microsoft Project on individual users' computers is different from running it in a Terminal Services environment. When you install Microsoft Project on a Terminal Services computer, the users who connect to the server are limited to the Microsoft Project configuration on that computer and cannot install or remove features.

In other words, all users running Microsoft Project under Terminal Services inherit the features you select during installation. If your users need different sets of Microsoft Project functionality, you might need several Terminal Services computers — one for each unique Microsoft Project configuration.

Because of the multiuser nature of the Terminal Services computer and because users' access to the server is restricted, you cannot select the following installation options for any Microsoft Project feature:

  • Run from CD or Run from Network

  • Run all from CD or Run all from Network

  • Installed on First Use

Instead, you must determine which Microsoft Project features your users need and select one of the following installation options for each feature:

  • Run from My Computer

  • Run all from My Computer

  • Not Available

Customize the Terminal Services transform

The Microsoft Project 2000 Resource Kit includes a Windows Installer transform that you must use when installing Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer; setup does not install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer without the transform. This transform, named TermSrvr.mst, is configured to install all Microsoft Project features to run from the local computer or not be installed at all. For information about installing TermSrvr.mst, see the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

What the TermSrvr.mst file does

The Windows installer transform included in the Microsoft Project 2000 Resource Kit, TermSrvr.mst, is configured to install Microsoft Project correctly on the Terminal Server computer. Microsoft Project Setup will not install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer without this transform.

The primary function of the TermSrvr.mst file is to modify the feature tree so that all Microsoft Project features are installed to run from the local computer. There are a few exceptions – those features that are not recommended or that do not perform well in the Terminal Services environment are set to not be installed at all.

In addition, the NOUSERNAME property is set so that Setup does not supply a default user name when you install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer. This setting ensures that users who log on to the Terminal Services computer are asked to provide a user name when they run Microsoft Project for the first time. This property is set internally in the transform – if you examine the transform with the Custom Installation Wizard, you do not see the NOUSERNAME property listed on the Modify Setup Properties panel.

The TermSrvr.mst file also sets a property to increase the amount of registry space allocated for Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer. This setting allows Microsoft Project to store necessary information in the registry for each Microsoft Project user. Again, this property is not listed on the Modify Setup Properties panel.

In the TermSrvr.mst file, Microsoft Project features are set to one of the following installation states:

  • Most features are set to Run from My Computer.

    These are features that work well in the Terminal Services environment.

  • A few features are set to Not Available.

    These are features that do not perform well in the Terminal Services environment, typically because they use additional animation that generates excess data traffic between the Terminal Services computer and the Terminal Client computer. Consider leaving these features set to Not Available so that they are not installed.

  • A few features are set to both Not Available and Hidden.

    These features do not work under Terminal Services because they rely on capabilities not available in this environment or they require write access to restricted areas of the Terminal Services computer. Leave these features set to Not Available so that they are not installed on the Terminal Services computer.

  • Some features are set to Run from My Computer and Hidden.

    These are features that are normally hidden in the Microsoft Project Setup feature tree, but they have been exposed in the Custom Installation Wizard so that you can choose whether you want to install them.

If you want to accept the default Microsoft Project configuration, you do not need to modify TermSrvr.mst. However, if there are Microsoft Project features that your users don't need, you can improve overall performance and conserve disk space by customizing TermSrvr.mst so that Microsoft Project Setup does not install these features on the Terminal Services computer.

Installing non-English versions of Microsoft Project 

The TermSrvr.mst file was created using the Windows Installer package (install.msi) for the U.S. English version of Microsoft Project 2000. Some other language versions of Microsoft Project have additional features that are not present in the U.S. English version, and the TermSrvr.mst file does not change the installation states of those features. If any of these additional features are set to Run from Network or Installed on First Use, then they will not function correctly on the Terminal Services computer.

To install a non-English version of Microsoft Project on a Terminal Services computer, you can use the Custom Installation Wizard to make sure that all features in the transform are set to either Run from My Computer or Not Available. For example, to install a Japanese version of Microsoft Project on a Terminal Services computer, customize the Terminal Services transforms as described below. Make sure you set the Feature Installation state of all Office Assistants to Not Available.

To customize the Terminal Services transform

Start the Custom Installation Wizard.

  1. On the Open the MSI File panel, specify the Microsoft Project MSI file, install.msi.

  2. On the Open the MST File panel, select Open an existing MST file and enter the file name and path of the TermSrvr.mst file.

  3. On the Select the MST File to Save panel, enter the file name and path of the TermSrvr.mst file.

    If you do not want to modify the original MST file, then you can enter a new file name for the wizard to create.

  4. On the Set Feature Installation States panel, set unneeded features to Not Available. 

    Make sure that all features that you want to install are set to Run from My Computer.

  5. On the remainder of the panels, make additional customizations to tailor the Microsoft Project installation on the Terminal Services computer.

    For example, to fully customize the way Internet Explorer 5 is installed, click Customize on the Customize IE5 Installation Options panel.

Toolbox   By default, the Terminal Services transform (TermSrvr.mst) does not install the Office Assistant. However, after running Microsoft Project Setup you can install the Motionless Office Assistant (Stillogo.acs) from the Office Resource Kit Web site. This Office Assistant uses no animation, so there is minimal network traffic between the Terminal Services computer and the Terminal Client computer. For information about installing the Motionless Office Assistant, see Terminal Server Tools in the Office 2000 Resource Kit Toolbox.

Install Microsoft Project on the Terminal Services computer

To install Microsoft Project, run Microsoft Project Setup on the Terminal Services computer. You can run Setup from a network administrative installation point or from the Microsoft Project CD. You must specify the Terminal Services transform (TermSrvr.mst) and additional command-line options.

Note   Before you install Microsoft Project on a Terminal Services computer, log on to the server with administrator privileges.

To install the Microsoft Project CD on the Terminal Services computer 

  1. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, click Install, and then click Next.

  2. Click Browse.

  3. In the root folder of the Microsoft Project CD, select setup.exe and click OK.

    Setup.exe is added to the Command line for installation program box.

  4. On the command line, add the following two commands after setup.exe, separated by spaces:

    TRANSFORMS="path \TermSrvr.mst"

    This command identifies the Terminal Services transform for Setup to use during installation. Specify the correct path to the MST file.

    /l* "%WINDIR%\Microsoft Project 2000 Setup(0001).txt"

    This optional command places the Setup log file in the Windows folder, rather than in the %TEMP% folder, so that it is not deleted automatically by Windows.

  5. Click Next.

  6. In Add/Remove Programs, select All users begin with common application settings, and then click Next to run Microsoft Project Setup.

Important   You must use Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel with the All users begin with common application settings option selected. This setting runs Setup in Install mode, which installs Microsoft Project for all Terminal Client users who connect to the Terminal Server computer. If you run Setup directly from the Microsoft Project CD, then Setup runs in Execute mode, which installs Microsoft Project only for the user running Setup.

Set default Microsoft Project application settings

You can use the Profile Wizard to customize the default Microsoft Project user settings for all users logging on to the Terminal Services computer. For best performance in this environment, consider setting the following options in Microsoft Project:

  • On the Tools menu, point to Customize, click Toolbars, and then click the Options tab. Set the Menu animations option to None.

  • On the Tools menu, point to Customize, and then click Toolbars. Remove the Detect and Repair command from the Help menu.

After you customize all the settings you want, run the Profile Wizard and save your settings in an OPS file. Store the OPS file in a folder that is accessible to users running Microsoft Project from the Terminal Services computer.

To point users to your customized settings 

  1. On the Start menu, click Run, and type regedit.exe to open the Windows Registry Editor.

  2. Create a new subkey named RunOnce in the following subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\Install\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Current Version 

  3. In the RunOnce subkey, create a new entry with a string value and any value name.

  4. Set the value of the new entry to the following:

    path\Proflwiz.exe /r file /q 

    where path is the fully qualified path to the Profile Wizard, and file is the file name and fully qualified path to the OPS file you created.

When users log on to the Terminal Services computer, Windows runs the Profile Wizard using the command line in the RunOnce subkey and restores the settings you saved in the OPS file. This command runs one time for each user the first time the user logs on to the Terminal Services computer.

Note   Users can access Microsoft Project Central using a browser that is running in a Terminal Services environment. For this to work, an administrator may need to initially log on to the Microsoft Project Central home page from the server where Windows Terminal Services is running in order to have the specific controls downloaded to the server if users on the server don't have permission to download controls. After this one-time session, users should be able to access Microsoft Project Central normally.

See also

Microsoft Project 2000 Setup contains other options that you may want to take advantage of, such as installing Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 and removing previous versions of Microsoft Project. For more information about Microsoft Project 2000 Setup, see "Setup Program" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

By using the Custom Installation Wizard, you can modify TermSrvr.mst to further customize your Terminal Services installation. For more information about the Custom Installation Wizard, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

For more information about the user settings that the Profile Wizard saves and restores, see "Profile Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Deployment with Systems Management Server

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Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) is a powerful software package that can be used to assess your computing environment and to deploy new software. You can deploy Microsoft Project 2000 and many other applications with SMS by creating Systems Management Server packages and distributing them to selected clients. New wizards and other enhancements make it easy to deploy multiple applications with Systems Management Server version 2.0.

This topic presents a high-level overview of using SMS to deploy Microsoft Project 2000. The package definition files (pdf) for deploying Microsoft Project with Systems Management Server are available in the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

Assessing Network Resources

Before you deploy Microsoft Project 2000 in your organization, use the software inventory, hardware inventory, and query features of Systems Management Server to determine which client computers in your organization can receive an upgrade and which client computers need a hardware upgrade before you install Microsoft Project 2000. You may also need to determine which servers in your network will host Microsoft Office Server Extensions (OSE) if your company needs to copy project files to Web folders. Finally, you may need to determine which servers will host Microsoft Project Central.

You can also use the SMS Network Monitor tool to assess your network environment to determine the impact that deployment will have on your current network resources. 

The network can be used in two ways to deploy Microsoft Project 2000. You can install Microsoft Project on client computers from a network server, or you can run Microsoft Project over the network from a server. You might need different configurations for the different levels of network connectivity within your organization.

Wide area network (WAN) connections:  For client computers connected over a slow-link network, installing or running Microsoft Project remotely over the network might not be practical.

Network operating systems in use:  Your particular network operating system might affect your plans for deploying Microsoft Project. Some issues to consider include server file sharing methods and client-server permission schemes.

Network bandwidth:  Installing Microsoft Project over the network or running Microsoft Project over the network place different demands on network bandwidth, both in response time and in length of time connected. You can use Network Monitor, a Systems Management Server utility, to help identify network traffic patterns and network problems.

Collecting hardware inventory

Before you run queries, you must first collect hardware inventory. When you collect a hardware inventory for the computers in your network, Systems Management Server automatically gathers a wide variety of information about each computer. Some of the most important information collected includes the following:

  • Processor type and speed

  • Memory capacity

  • BIOS

  • Hard disk space

This information helps determine whether a user's computer is capable of running Microsoft Project. Queries, collections, and reports that are shipped with Systems Management Server can help you categorize your systems. A basic query for Microsoft Project checks the amount of RAM, disk space, and processor type and speed on users' computers. You can also use reports generated from this information to plan for future upgrades.

Collecting software inventory

Before you upgrade to Microsoft Project 2000, you need accurate software inventory for existing servers and client computers. Then you can use a query to determine what operating system and application software programs are running when you plan your Microsoft Project 2000 deployment.

You can use Systems Management Server software inventory capabilities to collect information about the software running on client computers, including installed user configurations and operating environments and installed versions of Microsoft Project. This information helps you determine which computers are ready for the Microsoft Project 2000 upgrade.

Targeting client computers for upgrade

Running queries on hardware and software inventory data produces a list of target computers that can be upgraded to Microsoft Project 2000. Depending on the number of computers in this inventory, you can divide the computers into groups and stagger the distribution of Microsoft Project 2000. These subsets are known as machine groups in Microsoft Systems Management Server version 1.2, and collections in Microsoft Systems Management Server version 2.0.

See also

For more information about creating queries in Systems Management Server 1.2, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server 1.2 Resource Guide in the Microsoft BackOffice Resource Kit, Second Edition.

Preparing for Distribution

Microsoft SMS uses distribution points to store the files needed to distribute programs to client computers. Distribution points are servers on your site to which client computers connect to download applications or files. The software distribution process places the files required for Microsoft Project Setup on previously defined distribution points.

The following steps are required for preparing a Microsoft Project 2000 deployment with Systems Management Server:

  • Select distribution points for the installation.

    You can use the Manage Distribution Points Wizard in SMS Administrator to select distribution points (SMS 2.0 only).

  • Create an administrative installation point and copy it to the package source directory on your site server.

    Software distribution replicates these files to each distribution point.

  • Use the Custom Installation Wizard to add the Proj9spec.ini file to a Windows Installer transform (MST file) when you deploy Microsoft Project (SMS 1.2 only).

    This step is required to properly inventory Microsoft Project 2000 after deployment. It is not required for SMS 2.0.

    The file Proj9spec.ini is installed when you install ProjSMS.exe from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

  • Modify the package definition files (PDFs) as needed for your installation.

    When you modify a PDF, you can add a custom transform or change the Setup command line.

    Toolbox   The package definition files (PDFs) for deploying Microsoft Project with Systems Management Server are available in the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

  • Copy the PDFs that are included in the packages into the root directory of the administrative installation point. You must also copy any auxiliary files created by the Custom Installation Wizard or the SMS Installer.

See also

For more information about creating and modifying PDF files in Systems Management Server 2.0, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 Resource Guide in the BackOffice 4.5 Resource Kit.

For more information about creating software distributions in Systems Management Server 2.0, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 Administrator's Guide, which comes with SMS 2.0.

This Microsoft Project 2000 Resource Kit includes step-by-step instructions for creating an administrative installation point. For more information, see "Installing from a Network Server" in this article.

The new Microsoft Windows Installer technology uses Windows Installer transforms (MST files) to apply changes to the standard Microsoft Project installation. For more information, see "Setup Program" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Creating Systems Management Server Packages

To begin Microsoft Project 2000 deployment with Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS), you need to create a Systems Management Server package. SMS packages define both the files required to install the software and the configuration and identification information for the package itself. When you create a package, you must specify a Setup command line.

In Systems Management Server versions 1.2 and 2.0, you use package definition files (PDFs) to deploy Microsoft Project. A  PDF is an ASCII text file that contains predefined Workstations, Sharing, and Inventory property settings for a package. When you import a PDF, the properties of the package are automatically entered for you.

You can import the PDFs into the Distribute Software Wizard to complete the entire distribution in a single step. (The Distribute Software Wizard is available only in Systems Management Server 2.0.) Alternatively, you can import the PDFs into the Create Package from Definition Wizard to create just the software package.

When the wizard is finished, SMS displays the new package in the SMS Administrator. By default, the User and Guest accounts are granted change permissions to the package share on distribution points. You can modify the packages and programs by using the SMS Administrator.

Toolbox   SMS includes package definition files for a number of applications and various operating systems. The package definition files (PDFs) for deploying Microsoft Project with Systems Management Server are available in the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

Distributing Systems Management Server packages

When you distribute a Systems Management Server package, you must specify which computers receive the package, where the source files for the installation are located, and when the installation occurs.

In Systems Management Server 2.0, the distribution of packages to clients is a two-step process. First you create the package and send it to the distribution points; then you create an advertisement.

Systems Management Server 2.0 uses distribution points to store the files needed to distribute programs to clients. To run advertised programs, clients must have access to at least one distribution point. To send packages to distribution points, you use the Manage Distribution Points Wizard.

Like a job in Systems Management Server 1.2, a Systems Management Server 2.0 advertisement specifies the program to run on the client, the target collection that receives the package, and the schedule of when the program is available to clients.

See also

For more information about deploying software with Systems Management Server 1.2, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server 1.2 Resource Guide in the Microsoft BackOffice Resource Kit, Second Edition.

For more information about deploying software with Systems Management Server 2.0, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 Administrator's Guide, which comes with SMS 2.0. Information is also available in the Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 Resource Guide in the Microsoft BackOffice 4.5 Resource Kit.

For information about new developments and tools for Systems Management Server, see the Microsoft Systems Management Server Web site.

Managing a Successive Deployment

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The applications and tools included with Microsoft Project 2000 provide a wide range of functionality for users. Related products include analysis tools and plug-in language features that are available in the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack. You can install these applications and tools on users' computers at the same time that you deploy Microsoft Project, or you can stagger the deployment and install them when and where you need them.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.

Related Software

Microsoft Project 2000 includes the following applications:

  • Microsoft Project 2000

  • Microsoft Project Central

  • Browser Module for Microsoft Project Central

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 5

  • Microsoft Project 2000 Workgroup Message Handler

If you purchase Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack, you will have access to user interface language modules for Microsoft Project and Internet Explorer 5.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.

The following software, which works with Microsoft Project 2000, is available separately:

Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade:  Upgrades Windows and Internet Explorer to 128-bit encryption, which enhances data encryption for Internet Explorer 4.0 and Internet Explorer 5. You can download the 128-bit encryption upgrade from the Internet Explorer area on the Microsoft Windows Update Web site. For more information, see the Microsoft Internet Explorer Critical Updates Web site.

Keep in mind the following when you install and use Microsoft Project:

  • It is not recommended to have Microsoft Project 2000 and Microsoft Project 98 installed on the same computer.

  • Microsoft Project 2000 and Office 2000 Service Release 1 (SR-1) share certain files and components. If you are running Office 2000 without SR-1, then installing Microsoft Project may replace Office 2000 files with the updated SR-1 versions of them. For example, it will replace MSO9.dll.

  • You can create and update project data directly in a database while maintaining the consistency and integrity of the data. For more information, see the files projdb.htm and oledb.htm located on the Microsoft Project CD in the folder \Pfiles\Msoffice\Office\1033.

  • Switching the Microsoft Project user interface language using the MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project will automatically switch the user interface language for any Office 2000 application if you have installed the MultiLanguage Packs for Office 2000. If you have not installed MultiLanguage Packs for Office 2000, the language settings for the Office applications user interface won't switch.

It is not recommended that you use different language versions of Office and Microsoft Project. The language version of Microsoft Project should be either:

  • The same language as the Office language version installed on the system

    OR

  • The language version of Microsoft Project should match the System Locale.

If neither of the above is true, then the only case in which Microsoft Project will work is if the Microsoft Project language version is English.

For example,

  • If you install a German version of Microsoft Project on a system with a French version of Office and a French system locale, Microsoft Project will not boot.

  • If you install a German version of Microsoft Project on a system with a French version of Office and a French system locale, Microsoft Project will run.

  • If you install an English version of Microsoft Project on a system with a French version of Office and a German system locale, Microsoft project will run.

See also

To learn more about setting up Microsoft Project Central, see "Installing Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

To learn about how to work with the database structure and architecture of the Microsoft Project Central database, see "Microsoft Project Central Architecture" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Installation with Elevated Privileges on Windows NT and Windows 2000

Some of the installation programs for Microsoft Project 2000-related applications must make changes to system areas of the user's computer. These programs might update system files or make changes to system areas of the Windows registry.

Under Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows 98, any user logged on to the computer has access to these system areas and can run the installation programs. On the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 operating systems, however, system areas are protected from users running under normal user accounts. To install on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000, the installation program must have elevated privileges. A program running with elevated privileges has access to the protected areas of the system. 

You can use several methods to run an installation program with elevated privileges.

Logging on as an administrator

If you log on to the computer with a user account that has administrator privileges, then all programs that you run have elevated privileges. This method is the simplest way to install Microsoft Project on systems running Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000.

Advertising the Windows Installer package

You can use the /jm msifile command-line option to advertise the installer package (MSI file) on computers running under Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000. For example, to advertise Microsoft Project you can use the following command line:

setup.exe /jm install.msi

If you also include a Windows Installer transform (MST file) to customize the installation, use the /t command-line option to specify the transform. For example,

setup.exe /jm data1.msi /t install.mst

When you advertise a package, the package is configured to be installed the first time the user attempts to use the application. You must be logged on with administrator privileges to advertise a package.

Advertising a package is much faster than installing a package. When the user attempts to use the application for the first time, the Installer completes the installation under administrator privileges, including rebooting the system if necessary. The user can also run Setup to install specific features, and Setup runs under administrator privileges regardless of how the user is logged on.

Note   You cannot install Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 by advertising it. You can, however, install Internet Explorer 5 on the user's computer first, and then advertise Microsoft Project.

Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 with Internet Explorer 4.01 or later and Active Desktop™ support Windows Installer shortcuts. In this scenario, the Installer adds application icons to the Start menu when you advertise the package. When the user clicks one of these icons, the Windows Installer installs that application on the computer before running it. When installing the advertised package, the Windows Installer runs under administrator privileges, regardless of how the user is logged on, so it can make any needed system modifications.

Windows NT 4.0 without Active Desktop™ does not support Windows Installer shortcuts. In this case, you can advertise the package, but the user must run Setup to install the program. When the user runs Setup after Microsoft Project has been advertised, the Windows Installer performs the installation with administrator privileges.

Note   If you advertise a package, and the user later runs Setup to install Microsoft Project, then the user must specify the option /q, /qn, or /qb on the Setup command line. Setup cannot install an advertised package unless one of these command-line options is used.

Using Windows system policies

You can set a Windows system policy on the user's computer. The policy allows all Windows Installer packages to be installed with administrator privileges.

Caution   When you set these system policies, any Windows Installer package run by any user can make changes to the system. This arrangement makes the system vulnerable to viruses.

To enable elevated privilege on a user's computer by using policies 

  1. On the Start menu, click Run.

  2. Type regedit and click OK.

  3. Locate the following subkey in the Windows registry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer

  4. In the Installer subkey, set the value of AlwaysInstallElevated to 1.

  5. Locate the following subkey in the Windows registry:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer

  6. In the Installer subkey, set the value of AlwaysInstallElevated to 1.

  7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 for each user

Using Systems Management Server

If you are using Microsoft Systems Management Server to install Microsoft Project, you can run the Package Command Manager as a service on the user's computer so that it runs with administrator privileges.

See also

For more information on using Systems Management Server to deploy Microsoft Project, see "Deployment with Systems Management Server" in this article.

Requirements for Microsoft Project and Internet Explorer

Microsoft Project 2000 includes Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01. The Microsoft Project Setup program allows you to install Microsoft Project and Internet Explorer together, or you can use the Internet Explorer Setup program to install Internet Explorer separately. A typical installation of Microsoft Project 2000 will upgrade to Internet Explorer 5.01 if it is not already on the computer. If you deploy Microsoft Project or Internet Explorer with other Microsoft Project-related products and components, keep in mind the following installation requirements:

  • Installing Microsoft Project 2000, the Browser Module for Microsoft Project Central, or the Microsoft Project Workgroup Message Handler may require a reboot on Windows 98 or Windows NT 4.0, depending on the system components you have installed. It will not require a reboot on Windows 2000.

  • Installing Microsoft Project Central Server does require a reboot on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000.

  • Installing Internet Explorer 5 does require a reboot on Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0.

  • Installing Microsoft Project 2000 requires elevated privileges on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000. The program must either be installed by an administrator, or it must be advertised. For more information, see "Installation with Elevated Privileges on Windows NT and Windows 2000" in this article.

  • Installing the Browser Module for Microsoft Project Central, the Workgroup Message Handler, Internet Explorer 5 or Microsoft Project Central Server does require the user installing to have administrative privileges.

Microsoft Project 2000

To install Microsoft Project, run Setup.exe from the root folder of the CD. Using the /a command-line option, you can create an administrative installation point from which users can install Microsoft Project over the network. You can then run Setup.exe from the root folder of the administrative installation point to install Microsoft Project on users' computers.

Software prerequisites

Microsoft Project requires that other software be preinstalled or preconfigured on the user's computer before you install Microsoft Project.

Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later:  Required by Microsoft Project 2000 if you are installing it on the Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 operating system.

Internet Explorer 4.01 or later, or Browser Module for Microsoft Project Central:  Required by Microsoft Project Central.

Elevated privileges

To install Microsoft Project on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000, you must run Setup with elevated privileges. If Microsoft Project Setup requires you to reboot the user's computer, then you must be logged on with elevated privileges both before and after reboot. 

Reboot requirements

Microsoft Project Setup requires you to reboot the computer if you install Internet Explorer 5 or if Setup needs to update system files that are in use during installation. If Setup requires you to reboot the computer, then you must log on again using the same account so that Setup can finish the installation.

Microsoft Project Central

Microsoft Project Central is a Microsoft Project companion product that enables collaborative planning among workgroup members, project managers, and other project stakeholders. To learn about installing Microsoft Project Central, see "Installing Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Internet Explorer 5

To install Internet Explorer separately from Microsoft Project, run IE5Setup.exe from the IE5 folder of the Microsoft Project CD. Running IESetup.exe will install Internet Explorer 5.01. If you perform an administrative installation of Microsoft Project, you can also find IE5Setup.exe in the IE5 folder in the root of the administrative installation point.

You can customize how Setup installs Internet Explorer by running the Internet Explorer Administration Kit (Ieak5.exe) from the IE5\Language folder located in the root of the Microsoft Project CD or in the root of the Office administrative installation point.

Options for installing

There are different options for installing Internet Explorer, depending on which version is already installed on users' computers. A typical installation automatically the browser to Internet Explorer 5.01. Or you can do a custom installation and choose a minimum installation of Internet Explorer 5.01, or choose not to upgrade Internet Explorer.

Note   Online Help in Microsoft Project will not work unless users have Internet Explorer 4 or later or have the Windows Web Browsing Components). If Internet Explorer 3 or later is already installed, then users can choose either a Typical installation (which is the default), a Minimum installation, or they can choose not to upgrade Internet Explorer. 

If users do not any version of Internet Explorer already installed, and they do not want to install Internet Explorer 5.0, then at minimum they must choose to install the Windows Web Browsing Components. These do not affect your default browser, but do provide functionality required for certain Microsoft Project features.

Software prerequisites

By default, Internet Explorer uses 40-bit encryption technology for secure communications. The Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade modifies Microsoft Windows and Internet Explorer so that they can use 128-bit encryption.

You can download the 128-bit encryption upgrade from the Internet Explorer Downloads Web site. For more information, see the Microsoft Internet Explorer Critical Updates Web site.

Note   128-bit encryption is available only to users in the United States and Canada, and is limited by U.S. export license. For more information, see the Microsoft Security and Privacy Web site.

Elevated privileges

To install Internet Explorer on Windows NT 4.0 you must run IE5Setup with elevated privileges. You must be logged on with elevated privileges both before and after reboot.

Note   Because IE5Setup is not a Windows Installer application, you cannot advertise Internet Explorer 5, and the /j command-line option is not recognized.

Reboot requirements

IE5Setup requires you to reboot the computer after you install Internet Explorer. You must log on again using the same account so that IE5Setup can finish the installation.

See also

Microsoft Project 2000 Setup gives you many options when you install Microsoft Project on users' computers. For more information, see "Setup Program" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

The Custom Installation Wizard provides great flexibility for customizing the Microsoft Project installation process. For more information about the changes that you can make during Microsoft Project Setup, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Requirements for International Components

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.

The Language Packs for Microsoft Project Central are available from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

The English Language Pack for Microsoft Project will be shipped with the Hebrew, Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, and Korean versions of Microsoft Project 2000.

Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack

The Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack is separate from the Microsoft Project. To install the MultiLanguage Pack, you will have to run Setup.exe for each language you need from the MultiLanguage Pack CD-ROM. You can create administrative installation points for the for the languages you need on a network server by using the /a command-line option from the appropriate language subfolder.

Software prerequisites

Microsoft Project 2000 must be installed before you can install the MultiLanguage Pack.

Elevated privileges

You will need elevated privileges to install the MultiLanguage Pack on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000.

Reboot requirements

The MultiLanguage Pack doesn't require you to reboot the user's computer after installation under Windows 2000. You will need to reboot the computer on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 98.

Microsoft Project Central Language Packs

Language Packs for Microsoft Project Central are available from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.

Software prerequisites

Microsoft Project Central server will need to be installed before you install the Language Packs.

Elevated privileges

You will need elevated privileges to install Microsoft Project Central Language Packs on Windows 2000 or Window NT 4.0.

Reboot requirements

You will not need to reboot the computer after installing Microsoft Project Central Language Packs on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000.

English Language Pack for Microsoft Project

The English Language Pack for Microsoft Project will be shipped with the Hebrew, Japanese, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, and Korean language versions of Microsoft Project 2000. It will allow you to change the user interface to English in these language versions of Microsoft Project 2000.

Software prerequisites

The Hebrew, Japanese, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, and Korean versions of Microsoft Project 2000 must be installed before you can install the English Language Packs.

Elevated privileges

You will need elevated privileges to install the English Language Packs on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000.

Reboot requirements

The English Language Packs will not require you to reboot the user's computer after installation under Windows 2000. You will need to reboot the computer on Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 98.

See also

The MultiLanguage Pack allows users all over the world to run Microsoft Project 2000 user interface and online Help in their own languages and to create documents in many other languages. For more information, see "International Deployment" in this article.

The Custom Installation Wizard provides great flexibility for customizing the Microsoft Project installation process. For more information about the changes that you can make during Microsoft Project Setup, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

To learn more about international support in Microsoft Project Central, see "Installing Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

To learn more about multi-language support and international components in Microsoft Project Central, see "Deploying Multilanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Installation Sequence

Microsoft Project and Microsoft Project-related projects have a unique set of installation requirements, including what software must already be installed, whether elevated privileges are required during installation, and whether you must reboot the computer after installation. 

The following procedures outline the optimal sequences you can use to install Microsoft Project users' computers, taking into account the necessary software prerequisites and the elevated privileges and reboot requirements.

Note   When installing on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, you can choose whether to perform the entire installation under elevated privileges, or whether to allow your users to perform part of the installation process.

Installing on Windows 95

To install Microsoft Project and all related products on a computer running Microsoft Windows 95, use the following sequence.

To install Microsoft Project and related products on Windows 95

  1. If you want to standardize on a previous version of Internet Explorer, install Internet Explorer version 3.0 or 4.0 and reboot the computer.

  2. If you plan to work with Japanese or Chinese files, install the appropriate Japanese or Chinese Input Method Editor (IME).

  3. If you want to upgrade Windows and Internet Explorer to 128-bit encryption, install the Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade.

  4. Install Microsoft Project 2000. If you want to install Internet Explorer 5 at the same time, choose the Typical installation option. If you want to keep an older version of Internet Explorer, choose a Custom installation and specify this option in the custom installation steps.

  5. If you need to change the user interface language of Internet Explorer 5, install Internet Explorer user interface languages.

  6. Reboot the computer. Microsoft Project must complete its work after rebooting before you can install any other software.

  7. If you have Microsoft Project with MultiLanguage Pack and you want to install plug-in language features, install the MultiLanguage Pack.

  8. Reboot the computer.

Installing on Windows 98

To install Microsoft Project and all related products on a computer running Microsoft Windows 98, use the following sequence.

To install Microsoft Project and related products on Windows 98

  1. If you plan to work with Japanese or Chinese files, install the appropriate Japanese or Chinese IME.

  2. If you want to upgrade Windows and Internet Explorer 4.0 or Internet Explorer 5 to 128-bit encryption, install the Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade.

  3. Install Microsoft Project 2000. If you want to install Internet Explorer 5 at the same time, choose the Typical installation option. If you want to keep an older version of Internet Explorer, choose a Custom installation and specify this option in the custom installation steps.

  4. If you need to change the user interface language of Internet Explorer 5, install Internet Explorer user interface languages.

  5. Reboot the computer. Microsoft Project Setup must complete its work after rebooting before you can install any other software.

  6. If you have Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack and you want to install plug-in language features, install the MultiLanguage Pack.

  7. Reboot the computer.

Installing on Windows NT 4.0 with elevated privileges

To install Microsoft Project 2000 and all related products on a computer running Windows NT 4.0, use the following sequence. This procedure requires that you have elevated privileges on the user's computer.

To install Microsoft Project and related products on Windows NT 4.0 with elevated privileges

  1. Log on to the computer using an account that has administrator privileges.

  2. For Microsoft Project, install Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later.

  3. Reboot the computer.

  4. If you want to standardize on a previous version of Internet Explorer, install Internet Explorer 3.0 or 4.0 if not already installed, and reboot the computer.

  5. If you plan to work with Japanese or Chinese files, install the appropriate Japanese or Chinese Input Method Editor (IME).

  6. If you want to upgrade Windows and Internet Explorer 4.0 or Internet Explorer 5 to 128-bit encryption, install the Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade.

  7. Install Microsoft Project 2000. If you want to install Internet Explorer 5 at the same time, choose the Typical installation option. If you want to keep an older version of Internet Explorer, choose a Custom installation and specify this option in the custom installation steps.

Changing the user interface language

  1. If you need to change the user interface language of Internet Explorer 5, install Internet Explorer user interface languages.

  2. Reboot the computer. Microsoft Project must complete its work after rebooting before you can install any other software.

  3. If you have Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack and you want to install plug-in language features, install the MultiLanguage Pack.

  4. Reboot the computer.

Installing on Windows NT 4.0 without elevated privileges

To install Microsoft Project 2000 and all related products on a computer running under Windows NT 4.0 without all of the installation requiring elevated privileges, use the following sequence.

To install Microsoft Project and related products on Windows NT 4.0 without elevated privileges

  1. Log on to the computer using an account that has administrator privileges.

  2. For Microsoft Project and most other products, install Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later.

  3. Reboot the computer and then log on again with administrator privileges.

  4. If you want, Install Internet Explorer 3.0, Internet Explorer 4.0, or Internet Explorer 5; reboot the computer and log on again with administrator privileges.

  5. If you plan to work with Japanese or Chinese files, install the appropriate Japanese or Chinese Input Method Editor (IME).

  6. If you want to upgrade Windows and Internet Explorer 4.0 or Internet Explorer 5 to 128-bit encryption, install the Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade.

Changing the user interface language

  1. If you need to change the user interface language of Internet Explorer 5, install Internet Explorer user interface languages.

  2. Advertise Microsoft Project using the /jm Setup command-line option.

  3. Reboot the computer and log on with a user account.

  4. Install Microsoft Project. (It will be installed automatically the first time you try to use it.)

  5. If you have Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack and you want to install plug-in language features, install the MultiLanguage Pack.

Installing on Windows 2000

To install Microsoft Project 2000 and all related products on a computer running under Windows 2000, use the following sequence. 

  1. If you plan to work with Japanese or Chinese files, install the appropriate Japanese or Chinese Input Method Editor (IME).

  2. If you want to upgrade Windows and Internet Explorer 5 to 128-bit encryption, install the Internet Explorer 128-bit upgrade.

  3. Install Microsoft Project 2000. If you want Internet Explorer 5 to be upgraded to a later version that is shipped with Microsoft Project 2000 (Internet Explorer 5.01), at the same time, choose the Typical installation option. If you want to keep an older version of Internet Explorer, choose a Custom installation and specify this option in the custom installation steps.

  4. If you need to change the user interface language of Internet Explorer 5, install Internet Explorer user interface languages.

  5. If you have Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack and you want to install plug-in language features, install the MultiLanguage Pack.

See also

When you install products on a computer running under Windows NT 4.0, there are a number of ways to give the installation program elevated privileges. For more information, see "Installation with Elevated Privileges on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000" in this article.

To learn about installing Microsoft Project Central, a companion product to Microsoft Project 2000, in the correct sequence, see "Installing Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

International Deployment

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You can deploy and maintain a single version of Microsoft Project 2000 throughout your multinational organization. The plug-in language features of Microsoft Project with the MultiLanguage Pack allow users in foreign subsidiaries to continue working in their own languages.

The information in this chapter will familiarize you with the functionality that the MultiLanguage Pack provides and describes how to use it.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement. The Language Packs for Microsoft Project Central are available in the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox. For more information on using the Language Packs, see "Deploying MultiLanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Planning an International Deployment

The core functionality of Microsoft Project 2000 and the plug-in language features of the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack allows users all over the world to run the Microsoft Project 2000 user interface and online Help in their own languages and create documents in many other languages.

For administrators, this core functionality means that you can deploy a single version of Microsoft Project to all users, regardless of their language-speaking area. Then you can customize the installation to include local language capabilities or allow users to select their own language settings.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement.The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project includes five languages: German, Japanese, French, Italian, and Spanish. Other languages are available only as language-specific versions of Microsoft Project and not within the MultiLanguage Pack.You can also deploy and maintain a single version of Microsoft Project Central throughout your multinational organization. For example, this can be useful if you want to install an English version of Microsoft Project Central, while supporting German or Japanese users viewing and entering information in their native languages. Microsoft Project Central Language Packs for the following languages are currently available from the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox.LPK1: German, French, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, KoreanLPK2: Swedish, Danish, Brazilian Portugese, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, HebrewLPK3: Dutch, Czech, Polish, Finnish, and NorwegianThe language packs include files for displaying the Microsoft Project Central user interface and online Help in different languages. For administrators, this functionality means that you can deploy a single version of Microsoft Project Central to all users, regardless of their language-speaking area. Then you can customize the installation to include local language capabilities or allow users to select their own language settings.To learn more about localized versions of Microsoft Project Central, see "Deploying Multilanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project language versions and editing tools

The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 includes files for displaying the Microsoft Project user interface and online Help in several languages. The MultiLanguage Pack is based on the English version of Microsoft Project 2000; it doesn't work with localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000.

Note   Changing the user interface language for Microsoft Project changes the user interface language for Office and vice versa if you have installed the MultiLanguage Packs for both Microsoft Project and Microsoft Office.

If you have a Korean, Japanese, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, or Hebrew version of Microsoft Project and you want to see an English version of the user interface, you will be able to install and use the Microsoft Project English Language Pack. The English Language Pack will be shipped with these localized versions, and it will allow you to set these language interfaces back to English.

Microsoft Project does not ship its own proofing tools, but you can use the Microsoft Office Proofing Tools (which are shipped in the MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Office and are also available separately) to work with Microsoft Project 2000.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack Setup program is available in English only.

In addition to the multilingual capabilities of Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack, Microsoft Project 2000 is localized in many different languages. The localized versions are based on the same international core as Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack, but they provide more language-specific functionality.

You can install different combinations of Microsoft Project language versions and language-specific tools, based on the needs of your international organization, as described in the following table.

If you want to do this

Install this language version and tools

Deploy a single version of Microsoft Project internationally, but allow users to work in their own languages.

Microsoft Project with MultiLanguage Pack

Standardize on an English user interface, but allow users to edit documents in a variety of languages.

English Microsoft Project 2000 only

Provide users with fully localized functionality for Microsoft Project.

Localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000

Standardize on an English user interface, but provide proofing tools for editing in other languages.

Microsoft Project 2000 and the Office 2000 proofing tools

Provide users with fully localized functionality and provide proofing tools for editing in additional languages.

Localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 and the Office 2000 Proofing Tools

International deployment strategies

Depending on the structure of your organization and the languages that you need, you can adopt one of several different strategies for deploying Microsoft Project internationally. For example, you can deploy language-specific custom installations from a centralized administrative source. Or you can deploy Microsoft Project across your international administrative departments and allow each department to customize the installation for its own language-speaking area.

Deploying Microsoft Project from international headquarters

If your organization is centralized, where one administrative group deploys Microsoft Project to the entire organization, you can make all the customizations your users need at your headquarters and deploy directly to users internationally. In this scenario, you customize the MultiLanguage Pack and create a custom installation of Microsoft Project for each language-speaking area.

For example, if you were deploying Microsoft Project and the MultiLanguage Pack to users in the United States and Canada, you might deploy Microsoft Project as follows:

  • For English-speaking users in the United States, enable languages for editing as needed.

  • For Spanish-speaking users in the United States, install Spanish language features from the MultiLanguage Pack, leave the installation language set at U.S. English, set the user interface and online Help language to Spanish, and enable Spanish for editing (English is automatically enabled for editing if the installation language is English).

  • For users in English-speaking Canadian provinces, set the installation language to Canadian English, and enable Canadian French and Canadian English for editing.

  • For users in Qubec, install French language features from the MultiLanguage Pack, set the installation language to Canadian French, set the user interface and online Help language to French, and enable Canadian French and Canadian English for editing.

Deploying Microsoft Project at local subsidiaries

If your organization's administrative resources are distributed internationally, each local subsidiary can modify the standard installation for local users.

In this case, a central corporate administrative group supplies each local office with a standard Windows installer transform (MST file) with the installation language set to English. Local administrators customize the MultiLanguage Pack, select language settings, and modify the transform for their language-speaking areas.

For example, if you are a site administrator in Japan, you might customize the corporate deployment as follows:

  • Install Japanese language features on users' computers and set Japanese language features so that they are installed the first time users activate the features.

  • Set English or Japanese as the language for the user interface and online Help, set the installation language to English, enable Japanese and English for editing, and select Japanese as the preferred language.

  • Customize Microsoft Project for Japanese users.

See also

To learn about the multilanguage support in Microsoft Project Central, see "Deploying Multilanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project 2000 has many features designed to fit the needs of international organizations. For more information, see "Overview of International Features" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

The language features you install must be supported by the user's operating system. For more information, see "International Configuration" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project 2000 migrates settings from and can share files with previous localized versions of Microsoft Project. For more information, see "Planning an International Move" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Deploying Microsoft Project 2000 Internationally

The following general steps apply to all international deployments of Microsoft Project 2000:

  1. Create administrative installation points for the languages you need from the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack.

  2. Customize the MultiLanguage Pack installation.

  3. Install Microsoft Project and the MultiLanguage Pack on a test computer, and specify language settings.

  4. Customize the Microsoft Project installation for different language-speaking areas.

Notes   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement. When you customize the installation of Microsoft Project and the MultiLanguage Pack, you create separate Windows Installer transforms (MST files) for Microsoft Project and for the MultiLanguage Pack. You must distribute the MultiLanguage Pack transforms to users after Microsoft Project is installed on their computers. 

Create administrative installation points for the MultiLanguage Pack languages

To install the MultiLanguage Pack on a server, you will need to run the Setup program for the MultiLanguage Pack in administrative mode for each language you need.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack consists of sets of five languages on a single CD-ROM.

To create administrative installation point for the MultiLanguage Pack

Note   You need to follow this procedure separately for each language you create an administrative installation point for.

  1. Create a share on a network server for the administrative installation point.

    The network share must have at least 37 megabytes (MB) of available disk space for each language you want to create an administrative installation point for (with the exception of Japanese language support, which requires 62 MB of available hard-disk space)

  2. On a computer running Windows 95/98, Microsoft Windows NT, or Windows 2000 with write access to the share, connect to the server share.

  3. On the Start menu, click Run, and then click Browse.

  4. On the MultiLanguage Pack CD-ROM, browse to the appropriate language subfolder, select setup.exe, and then click Open.

  5. On the command line following setup.exe, type /a Langpack.msi, and then click OK.

    For example:

    e:\German\setup.exe /a Langpack.msi

  6. When prompted, enter the organization name you want to define for all users who install the MultiLanguage Pack from this location.

  7. When prompted for the installation location, enter the server and the share that you created.

Customize the MultiLanguage Pack installation

After you create an administrative installation points for the languages you need, you will be able to use the Custom Installation Wizard to create a customized installation of the MultiLanguage Pack for users in different language-speaking areas.

Important   If you are installing the MultiLanguage Pack on computers running a non-Western European language version of Windows, use only ASCII characters for the text you type to create the MST file in the Custom Installation Wizard. Otherwise, the Windows Installer package (MSI file) for the MultiLanguage Pack, which is based on the Western European code page, might not correctly interpret data in the transform.

To customize the MultiLanguage Pack installation

Note   You must follow this procedure for each language installation you want to customize.

  1. Start the Custom Installation Wizard.

  2. On the Open the MSI File panel, open Langpack.msi, the installer package for the MultiLanguage Pack, in the appropriate language subfolder.

  3. On the Open the MST File panel, click Do not open an existing MST file.

  4. On the Select the MST File to Save panel, specify a name for your custom MST file.

  5. On the Set Feature Installation States panel, select the features you want to install on users' computers and specify the installation states.

Install Microsoft Project 2000 and the MultiLanguage Pack and specify language settings

On a test computer, set Regional Settings (user locale) in Control Panel to match those of the target computer. Doing so allows Microsoft Project 2000 to configure itself for a particular locale when it is installed. If the user is running Microsoft Windows NT, you can also set the test computer's default code page and fonts (system locale) to match the target computer.

Note   In Windows NT 4.0, if you change the system locale, you must reinstall Windows NT Server 4.0 with Service Pack 3 to restore the operating system's user interface.

After the system and user locales are set, run Microsoft Project Setup from either the administrative installation point or from the CD-ROM. Then install the MultiLanguage Pack language from its administrative installation point by using a Windows Installer transform (MST file) that installs resources for the language settings you want.

Note   If you are using one computer to create more than one custom installation of Microsoft Project, be sure to remove one installation of the MultiLanguage Pack before you run the MultiLanguage Pack Setup program with another MST file.

When you run Microsoft Project 2000 to specify language settings and user preferences, you can use the Profile Wizard to store the settings in an Office profile settings (OPS) file. The OPS file becomes part of a customized installation of Microsoft Project 2000. Because the choice of editing languages affects the functionality of certain applications, you can create unique OPS files for different groups of users based on the languages they are using.

Typically, users creating multilingual documents rarely work with more than three languages. Limiting the number of editing languages results in a user interface that is less cluttered and allows Microsoft Project to run optimized for particular languages.

If you are installing Microsoft Project 2000 on a localized version of the Windows operating system, you can use the Language Version utility to make a custom installation of Microsoft Project behave more like a localized version. This utility is also applicable if you have installed Microsoft Project 2000 in one language and you want to remove that version and install Microsoft Project 2000 in a different language. For more information on how to use and run the Language Version utility, see the article, "Switch the Installation Language for Office 2000", on the Office Resource Kit Journal Web site.

Toolbox   The Language Version utility you use with Microsoft Project 2000 is the same one you use with Office. For information about installing this utility, see the Office Resource Kit Toolbox.Important   Running the Language Version utility replaces existing language-related settings and some other custom settings for several applications, so run the utility before you create any custom settings. When you're finished making settings for one language version, you can rerun the utility and make settings for another language version.

The Language Version utility will switch the installation language for Microsoft Project as well as Office.

The Language Version utility is different from the Language Settings utility. The Language Version utility is available as part of the Office Resource Kit Toolbox, and it is designed for administrators who are installing Office 2000 or Microsoft Project 2000. The Language Settings utility, on the other hand, is part of Office 2000 and Microsoft Project 2000 and is installed automatically with those applications by default. Users can run the Language Settings utility to change language settings after Office or Microsoft Project 2000 is installed.

After Microsoft Project 2000 and the MultiLanguage Pack are installed, specify language settings in Microsoft Project 2000

To create and store language settings

  1. On the Start menu, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Office Tools, and then click Microsoft Office Language Settings.

  2. Select languages to use for the user interface, online Help, and editing. Users can change these default settings later by running the Microsoft Office Language Version utility themselves.

  3. Start Microsoft Project 2000, and specify additional user settings.

  4. Start the Profile Wizard to save your settings in an OPS file.

Note   Changing the user interface language for Microsoft Project changes the user interface language for Office and vice versa if you have installed the MultiLanguage Packs for both Microsoft Project and Microsoft Office.Tip   Even though you include default language settings as part of the custom installation of Microsoft Project 2000, users can switch languages by running the Microsoft Office Language Settings utility (which is installed automatically by default with Office as well as Microsoft Project). To prevent users from switching languages, customize the Microsoft Project 2000 installation by using the Custom Installation Wizard and make the feature Microsoft Office\Office Tools\Language Settings Tool unavailable to users.

Customize Microsoft Project 2000 installation for different language-speaking areas

You run the Custom Installation Wizard to create customized installations of Microsoft Project 2000 for users in different language-speaking areas. Create a separate Windows Installer transform (MST file) for each language-speaking area.

Important   If you are installing Microsoft Project 2000 on computers running a non-Western European language version of Windows, use only ASCII characters for the text you type to create the MST file in the Custom Installation Wizard. Otherwise, the Installer package (MSI file) for Microsoft Project 2000, which is based on the Western European code page, might not correctly interpret data in the transform.

To customize the Microsoft Project 2000 installation for different language-speaking areas

  1. Start the Custom Installation Wizard.

  2. On the Set Feature Installation States panel, expand the Microsoft Project\Office Tools\International Support portion of the feature tree.

  3. Select the Core Support Files feature, and select an installation option. This set of files accommodates all commonly used code pages.

  4. Select the Extended Support Files feature, and select an installation option. This set of files accommodates code pages rarely used in Windows, such as EBCDIC, Macintosh, MS-DOS, Multilingual (Latin 1), and IBM Cyrillic.

  5. In the same panel of the Custom Installation Wizard, you can set the installation state for language-specific features, such as for bidirectional support or Japanese fonts.

  6. On the Customize Default Application Settings panel, click Get values from an existing settings profile, and enter the path to the OPS file that contains your custom language settings.

  7. On the Add Installations and Run Programs panel, include any batch files you created to install extra language utilities from the MultiLanguage Pack CD-ROM.

  8. On the Modify Setup Properties panel, double-click INSTALLLANGUAGE, and select a language.

    The installation language setting determines the default behavior of Microsoft Project.

When you select language-specific features on the Set Feature Installation States panel, keep in mind the following:

  • If your users work with languages that use more than one code page, install the Core Support Files feature on users' computers.

  • If your users work with a right-to-left language (Hebrew) and their operating system can support right-to-left text, install the Bidirectional Support feature on users' computers.

  • If your users work with Asian text and they are not running a matching language version of Windows, install the Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, or Simplified Chinese fonts on users' computers.

  • If your users need a full Unicode font — for example, if they are working with a project that include languages that use more than one code page — install the Universal font on users' computers.

Note   For users running a non-Asian version of Windows NT version 4.0 or Windows 2000, do not install more than two of the Asian or Universal font choices. These fonts include many characters and might not display properly if more than two of them are installed on a computer running Windows NT version 4.0.

See also

The steps for customizing and distributing Microsoft Project 2000 and the MultiLanguage Pack are part of the larger process of deploying Microsoft Project 2000. For more information, see "Managing a Successive Deployment" in this article.

In addition to specifying language features and providing support for international users, you can customize many other aspects of your Microsoft Project 2000 installation. For more information, see "Customizing Feature Installation" and "Customizing Options Settings" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

You can use the Custom Installation Wizard to customize international installations of Microsoft Project. For more information, see "Custom Installation Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

You can use the Profile Wizard to save language-related settings to a file you distribute as part of a custom installation of Microsoft Project 2000. For more information, see "Profile Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Customizing Language Features

You can customize language settings when you deploy Microsoft Project 2000 by using the Custom Installation Wizard and the Profile Wizard. These wizards record your settings and modify the Windows registry on users' computers when users install your customized version of Microsoft Project.

When Microsoft Project is installed, Setup creates the following registry subkey:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\9.0\Common\LanguageResources

When Microsoft Project is running, it looks up entries in the LanguageResources subkey to determine language-related default behavior. For example, Microsoft Project checks LCID entries and turns on its language auto-detection feature for languages that are enabled for editing.

Customizing the installation language

When you install Microsoft Project 2000, an installation language setting is added to the Windows registry. When users start Microsoft Project, the application reads this setting to determine default behavior, such as whether to display language-specific capabilities.

In the Language Resources subkey, Microsoft Project Setup creates an entry named InstallLanguage with a value equal to the locale ID (LCID) for the installation language of Microsoft Project. For example, if the value of InstallLanguage is 1041, the installation language is Japanese.

Microsoft Project Setup automatically sets the installation language to correspond to the language version of Microsoft Project that you purchased. You can customize the installation language for foreign offices, however, so that Microsoft Project runs with defaults that match foreign locations.

To customize the installation language during deployment, double-click INSTALLLANGUAGE on the Modify Setup Properties panel of the Custom Installation Wizard, and select a language in the Value box.

Toolbox   The installation language is set when you install Microsoft Project 2000. The Language Version utility included in the Office Resource Kit, allows you to change the installation language after Microsoft Project is installed. For information about installing this utility, see the Microsoft Office Resource Kit Toolbox and the Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox. For more information on how to use the Language Version utility, see the article, "Switch the Installation Language for Office 2000," on the Office Resource Kit Journal Web site.Note   Switching the installation language for Microsoft Project also changes the installation language for Office.

Customizing the executable mode

If an Asian or right-to-left language, such as Hebrew, is enabled for editing, Microsoft Project must run in a mode that supports Asian or right-to-left text. This mode is known as the executable mode. When you deploy Microsoft Project, you can specify the executable mode for a group of users.

Note   For users running an Asian or right-to-left language version of Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Project works best when the executable mode is set to match the language of the operating system.

To customize the executable mode during deployment, use the Office Language Settings utility to set the executable mode, and then capture the setting by using the Profile Wizard.

To set the executable mode

  1. On the Start menu, point to Programs, and then point to Microsoft Office Tools.

  2. Click Microsoft Office Language Settings.

  3. On the Enabled Languages tab, select the Asian or right-to-left languages that you want to be available for editing documents.

  4. If prompted, in the Preferred Language box, select the preferred Asian or right-to-left language.

In Microsoft Project, if you select one Asian language as the executable mode, you can still work in other Asian languages. However, some features (such as number formats) might be supported only by the preferred language. In Microsoft Project, if you want the applications to support right-to-left text, you must select a right-to-left language as the preferred language.

Customizing languages for user interface, online Help, and editing

Microsoft Project 2000, allows users to choose different languages for displaying menus and dialog box text, Help text, and for editing documents. To customize users' default language choices during deployment, use the Microsoft Project Language Settings utility to select languages, and then capture the settings by using the Profile Wizard.

To select language settings

  1. On the Start menu, point to Programs, and then point to Microsoft Office Tools.

  2. Click Microsoft Office Language Settings, and then click the User Interface tab. The User Interface tab is available only if the MultiLanguage Pack has been installed.

  3. In the Display menus and dialogs in box, select the user interface language.

  4. In the Display Help in box, select a language for online Help. If you don't specify a language in the Display Help in box, the online Help language defaults to the language that you selected as the user interface language.

  5. Click the Enabled Languages tab, and select languages that you want to be available for editing documents.

  6. In the Installed version of Microsoft Office box, select a subset of the Office installation language, such as Canadian or U.S. English (optional).

    If the installation language of Microsoft Project is English, French, German, or Norwegian, selecting the local variety of the language makes utilities such as spelling checkers more useful.

Enabling languages without the MultiLanguage Pack

The options on the User Interface tab in the Microsoft Office Language Settings dialog box include all the languages installed from the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack. However, the options on the Enabled Languages tab include all the languages supported by Office, regardless of what is installed from the MultiLanguage Pack.

Consequently, you can enable functionality for working with certain languages regardless of whether the MultiLanguage Pack is installed. For example, by selecting Korean as an editing language, you enable Asian and Korean features in Microsoft Project regardless of whether Korean proofing tools from the MultiLanguage Pack are available.

If you installed the Microsoft Office 2000 Proofing Tools instead of the MultiLanguage Pack, Microsoft Project uses those proofing tools for the languages you enable for editing.

System Policy Tip   You can use system policies to specify default language settings for any group of users in your organization. In the System Policy Editor, set the Microsoft Office 2000\Language Settings\User Interface policies to determine user interface languages. To determine editing languages, set the Microsoft Office 2000\Language Settings\Enabled Languages\Show controls and enable editing for policies. For more information about the System Policy Editor, see "Using the System Policy Editor" in Part 4 – Management and Support of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

When you set system policies for the user interface and online Help, be sure the languages you select are supported by users' operating system, as follows:

  • In English and European versions of Microsoft Windows 95/98 and Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, users can run the user interface and online Help in English and all European languages.

  • In Asian and right-to-left languages, such as Hebrew, versions of Windows 95/98 and Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, users can run the user interface and online Help in English or the language of their operating system.

Deploying Localized Versions

Deploying Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack will give you the advantage of having a single installation of Microsoft Project for your entire international organization. However, because some plug-in language features are limited, you might decide to deploy localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 in some language-speaking areas.

Disadvantages of installing localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 

There are some drawbacks to deploying localized versions of Microsoft Project rather than standardizing on a single version. With separate versions, you need separate procedures for deployment, support, and administration. Also, localized versions do not usually support the ability to switch the language of the user interface.

However, some localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000 will provide limited ability to switch the language of the user interface. You will be able to switch the language of the user interface to English in the following localized versions of Microsoft Project 2000:

  • Hebrew

  • Simplified Chinese

  • Traditional Chinese

  • Japanese

  • Korean

To switch the user interface for these languages to English, you can use the English Language Pack for Microsoft Project 2000, which will be shipped with these localized versions.

Depending on your needs, you can deploy a localized version of Microsoft Project 2000 in selected language-speaking areas. For example, you might deploy Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack everywhere except Japan, where you deploy the Japanese version of Microsoft Project 2000.

Supporting Traveling Users

 Cc722568.spacer(en-us,TechNet.10).gif Cc722568.spacer(en-us,TechNet.10).gif

Microsoft Project 2000 makes it easier than ever to support users who travel between computers on a network. With new installation options and an improved model for storing user preferences, users can travel and take their Microsoft Project 2000 documents and settings with them.

Taking Your Project with You

Traveling users (sometimes referred to as roaming users) move between different computers on a network. By using Microsoft Project 2000, traveling users can move between computers without changing the way that they work. Their application settings and working files travel with them, along with any system preferences.

It's possible for users to travel because of roaming user profiles. Microsoft Windows 95/98, Windows NT Workstation version 4.0, and Windows 2000 Professional support roaming user profiles, as do Windows NT Server 4.0, Windows 2000 Server, and third-party servers. Microsoft Project 2000 takes advantage of the operating systems' features to make Microsoft Project settings travel with your users.

When you turn on roaming user profiles, you can keep employees working no matter where they happen to be. Users can switch between computers in a lab, in different buildings, or in different offices around the world, as long as they log on to the same network and retrieve their user information from that network. This flexibility helps you make the most of your computer resources.

Example

If your company has several offices in one region, you can take advantage of roaming user profiles to make these offices work like one office.

For example, you might have a manager who is currently working on a project that includes confidential resource information, which is included in a few hidden columns. He customizes his toolbar to include a button that hides or displays hidden columns of resource information. This gets stored in his Global.mpt file, which is part of his user profile (since it is stored under the <user profile>\Application Data folder

He is called to a meeting with the Finance group to go over the information he's just been working on. He logs off his computer, thus updating his user profile. During the meeting, he logs on to a computer in the conference room and retrieves his project file, and then he uses his customized toolbar to display the hidden columns. He's able to review his arguments as the meeting goes along and make his arguments to the Finance group.

Sharing computers among multiple users

If your company doesn't fit the typical "one user to one computer" scenario, you can use roaming user profiles to make sure that your users always have access to their information on whatever computer they are using that day.

For example, several users might take advantage of computers in your lab on an as-needed basis. One user logs on to work on a project in Microsoft Project. He saves his project as a template so that he can use it again to create his next report. When he logs off, his user profile is updated with the change.

Later that same day, another user logs on to the same computer and opens Microsoft Project to create a project. She uses the New command (File menu) and selects from the standard list of available templates. The template that her coworker created does not appear in her list. She goes on to perform her work as usual.

System Requirements for Traveling Users

To set up roaming user profiles for your traveling users, your server and client computers must have the following software installed.

Server requirements
  • Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0 or Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

    – or –

    Novell NetWare version 3 or higher

    – or –

    Other third-party servers that support roaming user profiles

    Note   The server must support long file names for user profiles to travel successfully.

Client requirements
  • Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 or Windows 2000 Professional

    – or –

    Windows 98 with user profiles turned on

    – or –

    Windows 95 including Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.01 with Service Pack 1 with the Active Desktop™ and user profiles turned on

    Note   Roaming user profiles are platform-specific. Because of differences between the Windows registry and the Windows NT registry, users cannot travel between Windows 95/98 and Windows NT or Windows 2000.

Other requirements
  • Administrator or User privileges for all user and computer accounts. Accounts with Guest privileges do not travel.

See also

For additional information about setting up roaming user profiles on your Windows NT network, see the Windows NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit.

For additional information about user profiles and your client operating system, see the product documentation for Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT Workstation 4.0, or Windows 2000 Professional.

Preparing Microsoft Project for Traveling Users

Users are able to travel easily between computers when their documents and application preferences travel with them. This requires configuring the Microsoft Project 2000 installation to make it easier for users to travel and configuring the operating system to support users who travel.

A uniform configuration of operating system and application software throughout your network simplifies the task of supporting traveling users. In addition, it helps to install Microsoft Project 2000 to the same place on each computer.

Flexible application shortcuts with the Windows Installer

Standard shortcuts to an application contain a path to the program file. With the new Windows Installer, however, you can take advantage of a more flexible type of shortcut. Windows Installer shortcuts use a globally unique identifier (GUID) to point to the application, so they are not dependent on a particular application path.

Microsoft Windows Installer shortcuts make it easy to support traveling users. When you use Windows Installer shortcuts, you don't have to worry about installing Microsoft Project to the same place on each computer. When users click a Windows Installer shortcut, the shortcut tracks down Microsoft Project. If the application isn't installed, the Installer automatically installs the missing application, and users can resume their work.

Windows Installer shortcuts work with Microsoft Project 2000 running on Microsoft Windows 2000 and Windows 98. You can also use them with Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95 including Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 with Service Pack 1 and Active Desktop™ turned on. Windows Installer shortcuts are created automatically when you install Microsoft Project 2000 on one of these operating systems.

The following guidelines can help you make your environment work well for traveling users:

Install Microsoft Project 2000 to the same folder on each computer:  If users travel from a computer that has Microsoft Project installed on drive C to a computer that has Microsoft Project installed on drive D, their shortcuts and customized settings might not work correctly.

Install Microsoft Project on a per-computer, rather than per-user, basis:  Traveling users rely on user profiles to transfer their individual settings. However, you can save both hard disk space and download time by installing Microsoft Project 2000 on a per-computer basis. For Windows NT and Windows 2000, log on as an administrator of the computer and then install Microsoft Project 2000. For Windows 95/98, install Microsoft Project before you turn on user profiles. Installing on a per-computer basis ensures that the installation information is shared between all users on that computer, so it does not need to be stored separately for each user.

Note   Installing Microsoft Project 2000 before enabling user profiles on computers running Windows 95/98 gives you a per-computer installation of Microsoft Project 2000. Be aware, however, that using this method for Windows 95/98 can cause Windows Installer shortcuts to display a generic image, rather than the application icon. The shortcuts continue to function correctly; only the image is affected.

Install Microsoft Project to run from the network:  If you install the Microsoft Project on the network, Microsoft Project is always available to traveling users, as long as your network is running. With the applications on the network, you also cut down on the number of files and other objects that must be copied to each hard disk when users travel to a new computer.

Install Microsoft Project to run from the local hard disk:  You can install Microsoft Project to run from the local hard disk. For example, if everyone uses Microsoft Project daily, you can ensure that their work is not interrupted by server problems by installing Microsoft Project on the local hard disk.

Store user information on the network:  When you configure a user profile to roam, it is copied to the network and then downloaded when a user travels to a new computer. To make roaming even easier, you can also store other information, such as your users' My Documents or Personal folders on a server so that users can open their documents from the server, no matter which computer they are using.

Tip   If you store user information on a file server, rather than your Primary Domain Controller (PDC), you can also balance the load on your servers more efficiently. For more information about load balancing, see your network documentation.

Create a default Microsoft Project user profile:  The Microsoft Project Resource Kit Toolbox includes the Profile Wizard that you can use with Microsoft Project to save a set of Microsoft Project options. This set of options is called a Microsoft Project user profile. You can start all of your users off with the same configuration by creating and deploying a default Microsoft Project user profile when you deploy Microsoft Project 2000.

Set system policies:  You can protect or enforce important settings through system policies. For example, if you want all users to save files in a particular format, you can set the file type to use through a system policy.

Tip   Do not lock down the system entirely if you are supporting traveling users. Make sure that user profiles and system policies allow users to install the applications they need when they travel to a new computer. You can also set the Always install with elevated privileges policy for the Windows Installer. This policy allows any user to install Microsoft Project 2000 features as if the user were an administrator for that computer.

See also

You can use the Profile Wizard to create a Microsoft Project profile and give your traveling users a standard environment to start from. For more information about using the Profile Wizard, see "Profile Wizard" in Part 3 – Customizing Installation of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

You can set system policies to control which options are available to your traveling users. For more information about system policies and Microsoft Project options, see "System Policies" in Part 4 – Management and Support of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Traveling users rely on roaming user profiles to track their user information. For more information about roaming user profiles in Windows NT 4.0, see "Configuring Windows Clients for Traveling Users" in this article.

Customizing Installation for Traveling Users

There are several settings that you can change in the Custom Installation Wizard to make it easier to set up Microsoft Project 2000 for traveling users.

To customize the Microsoft Project 2000 installation for traveling users

  1. Start the Custom Installation Wizard.

  2. On the Specify Default Path and Organization panel, verify that <Program Files>\Microsoft Office appears in the Default installation path box.

  3. On the Set Feature Installation States panel, click the down arrow next to Microsoft Project. Select Run from Network if the network is always available to traveling users and you want Microsoft Project to run off the network. Select Run from My Computer if you want to install Microsoft Project on the local hard drive and ensure that it is always available regardless of network or server problems.

  4. On the Customize Default Application Setting panel, click Get values from an existing settings profile and then type the path to your Microsoft Project profile settings (OPS) file.

  5. On the Modify Setup Properties panel, click TRANSFORMSATSOURCE in the Property Name box, and then click Modify.

  6. In the Value box, click Set property to 'True'.

Packing for the Trip with User Profiles

Traveling users rely on user profiles to track their user information and on servers to make sure that the user profile information travels with them. Microsoft Project 2000 helps traveling users by storing all application data (such as user information, working files, and settings and preferences) in the Application Data folder for easy retrieval by the profile.

The Application Data folder is stored in different places, depending on your operating system installation. The following table identifies the default locations for the Application Data folder for each installation.

Installation scenario

Default location for Application Data folder

Installing Microsoft Windows 98 or Windows 95

\Windows\Profiles\Username

Upgrading to Windows 2000 from Windows 95/98

%Systemdrive%\Documents and Settings\Username

Installing Microsoft Windows NT 4.0

\Winnt\Profiles\Username

Upgrading to Windows 2000 from Windows NT 4.0

\Winnt\Profiles\Username

Installing Windows 2000

%Systemdrive%\Documents and Settings\Username

Microsoft Project 2000 stores all user-specific settings in the HKEY_CURRENT_USER subtree in the Windows registry. (Previous versions of Microsoft Project stored these settings in both the HKEY_CURRENT_USER and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE subtrees.) With all the Microsoft Project 2000 settings in one place, it's easier to retrieve settings and keep the user profile up to date.

To support traveling users, you must set up both client and server computers with roaming user profiles (profiles that travel with the user account). Roaming user profiles are stored on the server and automatically downloaded to the client computer when users log on.

Note   Roaming user profiles are platform-specific. Because of differences between the Windows registry and the Windows NT registry, users cannot travel between Windows 95/98 and Windows NT or Windows 2000 operating systems.

With roaming user profiles, traveling users can log on to any computer on the network and download their user profile information. When users change any of their settings, their profiles are automatically updated on the server when they log off and their new information is automatically updated, too.

Note   During Setup, the Windows Installer lets you set Microsoft Project 2000 to Installed on First Use. This installation option works on a per-computer basis rather than on a per-user basis, so the Windows Installer cannot track whether Microsoft Project has been installed for a particular user as they travel between computers. Your users' application settings travel, but not the specific applications that have been installed on a particular computer. When users log on to the new computer and attempt to open Microsoft Project, they might have to wait while it is installed.

See also

To learn how Microsoft Project Central maintains user settings using cookies, see "How Microsoft Project Central Uses Cookies to Maintain Settings" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Configuring Windows Servers for Traveling Users

Setting up roaming user profiles for a Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000 network involves two steps on the server side:

  1. Create a shared Profiles folder on the server to store roaming user profiles.

  2. Update client user profiles to point to the shared Profiles folder.

Tip   Use a file server, rather than your Primary Domain Controller (PDC), to store user profiles. Using a file server helps you balance the workload without straining the resources on your PDC.

After you update the profile information to point to that shared folder, the profile is retrieved automatically when the user logs on and updated automatically when the user logs off. This retrieving and updating process is called reconciling the user profile.

Create a Profiles folder on the server

The Profiles folder stores all your roaming user profiles on an NTFS drive on the server. Make sure your traveling users have full control permissions to their subfolders so they can update their profiles whenever they change. However, do not give users access to any subfolders other than their own.

Note   Do not create the Profiles folder in the %Systemroot% directory on your server. If you use %Systemroot%\Profiles, the client computer uses the local profile instead of the server copy.

Update client user profiles to point to the Profiles folder

You update all your client user profiles on the PDC server.

To update user profile information for each traveling user using Windows NT 4.0

  1. On the PDC server, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools (Common), and then click User Manager for Domains.

  2. In the list of user names, double-click a user name.

  3. In the User Properties box, click Profile.

  4. In the User Profile Path box, type the full path to the Profiles folder you created (Windows NT Workstation client).

    – or –

    Under Home Directory, in the Local Path box, type the full path to the Profiles folder you created (Windows 95/98 client).

    For example, \\Servername\Subfoldername\Profiles.

To update user profile information for each traveling user using Windows 2000 Server

  1. On the PDC server, click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Computer Management.

  2. Click Local Users and Groups, click Users, and then double-click a user name.

  3. In the User Properties box, click the Profile tab.

  4. In the Profile Path box for the user, type the full path to the Profiles folder you created (Windows NT Workstation client or Windows 2000).

    – or –

    Under Home Folder, in the Local Path box, type the full path to the Profiles folder you created (Windows 95/98 client).

    For example, \\Servername\Subfoldername\Profiles.

See also

For additional information about setting up roaming user profiles on your Windows NT network, see the Windows NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit.

You can set profile information for all of the users in your organization at once by using a system policy. For more information about system policies, see "System Policies" in Part 4 – Management and Support of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Configuring Windows Clients for Traveling Users

Setting up roaming user profiles for a Microsoft Windows client involves different steps, depending on the client you are supporting. Microsoft Windows NT Workstation and Windows 2000 clients are automatically set up for roaming user profiles. Microsoft Windows 98 and Windows 95 clients must be configured to support roaming before your user profiles can roam.

For roaming user profiles to work, you must use the same drive and directory names for the Windows client on each computer that the user travels to. For example, if you install Windows in C:\Windows on one computer, and in C:\Win or D:\Windows on other computers, some components of the user profile are not transferred successfully between the computers.

Note   Roaming user profiles are platform-specific. Because of differences between the Windows registry and the Windows NT registry, users cannot travel between Windows 95/98 and Windows NT or Windows 2000.

Configure Windows NT Workstation and Windows 2000 clients for traveling users

Windows NT and Windows 2000 clients support roaming user profiles and traveling users with the least amount of administrative cost. Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 and Windows 2000 Professional are both automatically set up for traveling users. Both operating systems have user profiles turned on by default, and both store user files in the user profile. All you need to do is to configure the user account on the domain server.

Note   Users' data for digital identification does not roam to other computers. Instead, users with digital identification must store their encryption keys on a diskette and copy them to a new computer at their destinations.

Configure Windows 98 clients for traveling users

Windows 98 was designed with traveling users in mind. Windows 98 stores files in the Application Data folder, where they can be retrieved and replicated easily. User profiles are available, although they are not turned on by default.

To enable traveling users for Windows 98

  1. On the client computer, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  2. Double-click the Passwords icon.

  3. Click the User Profiles tab, and then click Users can customize.

Configure Windows 95 clients for traveling users

You can modify Windows 95 to support traveling users by installing Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.0 or later and by turning on user profiles. When you install Internet Explorer 4.0, you mimic the environment found in Windows 98. Internet Explorer Setup creates the Application Data folder and stores files there, making it easy to retrieve them as part of the user profile.

To enable traveling users for Windows 95

  1. Install Internet Explorer 4.0 or later on the client computer.

  2. On the client computer, click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

  3. Double-click the Passwords icon.

  4. Click the User Profiles tab, and then click Users can customize.

See also

You can set profile information for all of the users in your organization at one time by using a system policy. For more information about system policies, see "System Policies" in Part 4 – Management and Support of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Special Considerations for International Travelers

Because operating systems differ in their support of some languages, users who are traveling internationally can take their roaming user profiles to another computer only when both the source and destination computers use the same code page.

Note   You must have a consistent level of security in your operating system to travel successfully between computers. For example, if you are using a Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 computer with 128-bit encryption capabilities, you must travel to another Windows NT 4.0 computer with 128-bit encryption in order for all of your security settings to work as expected.

Within the limitations of multilingual support in various operating systems, you can accommodate users who travel internationally. The following operating systems allow users to take roaming user profiles from one computer to another:

  • Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 or Windows 95 or Windows 98. In this case, both the destination computer and the source computer must use the same language version of the operating system.

    – or –

  • Windows 2000 Professional with support for multiple languages.

For example, if your organization is based in the United States, but your users travel frequently to Europe and Asia, you can install the English version of Windows NT Workstation 4.0 or Windows 98 on all computers available to traveling users. This arrangement allows traveling users to take their Microsoft Project 2000 settings and files with them.

Alternatively, if you do not want to use the English version of the operating system in foreign subsidiaries, you can install Windows 2000 Professional configured with the Multilingual User Interface (MUI). Traveling users can set the locale of their operating system, travel to any other computer running Windows 2000 Professional, and take their roaming user profiles with them.

If international users need the Microsoft Project 2000 MultiLanguage Pack to display the user interface and online Help in another language, install the MultiLanguage Pack on computers that traveling users will use. Just as with Microsoft Project, install the MultiLanguage Pack on a per-computer basis, and install it on the same drive (such as drive C or D) throughout your organization.

Note   The MultiLanguage Pack for Microsoft Project 2000 is available through Microsoft licensing programs such as Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreement. Tip   When traveling users log on to the network, their roaming user profiles are downloaded to their new locations. For users who travel abroad, it might be more efficient to set them up to use a local server at their destinations, rather than downloading large amounts of data from their original domains.

See also

If all traveling users have Microsoft Project 2000 with MultiLanguage Pack, they can use the MultiLanguage Pack to run the user interface and online Help in any supported language. For information about the plug-in language capability of Microsoft Project, see "Overview of International Features" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

Microsoft Project does not automatically uninstall MultiLanguage Pack files. If a traveling user leaves behind a set of languages, you might want to delete the associated language files. For more information, see "Removing MultiLanguage Pack Files" in Part 7 – lnternational Use of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

To learn about multilanguage and localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central, see "Deploying Multilanguage and Localized Versions of Microsoft Project Central" in Part 6 – Microsoft Project Central of the Microsoft Project Resource Kit.

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