Lesson 1: Preparing the Infrastructure for Exchange Installation

Installing Exchange Server 2007 is not just a matter of placing the installation media in the nearest DVD-ROM drive and clicking through a wizard. The network infrastructure into which you will introduce Exchange needs to be prepared. Certain modifications and extensions need to be made to Active Directory before Exchange can be installed successfully. These modifications and extensions are significant. As you are likely to be aware from your study of Active Directory, rolling back changes can be difficult. You need to know what to do and how to do it. If you do not, at best you will have a failed Exchange installation that you will need to restart from the beginning. At worst, you will have messed up your network infrastructure and might have to pull it all apart and then put it back together. This lesson will also touch on Exchange Administrator roles and what steps need to be taken to prepare environments that have a previous Exchange deployment for the introduction of Exchange Server 2003.

After this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Extend Active Directory schema.
  • Prepare Active Directory in all domains where Exchange Server 2007 or mail-enabled objects will be deployed.
  • Confirm Active Directory preparation, including permissions, groups, and schema.
  • Understand the difference between and configure the four separate Exchange Administrator roles.
  • Prepare an infrastructure utilizing a previous version of Exchange for migration to Exchange Server 2007.

Estimated lesson time: 40 minutes



Preparing Active Directory

Just as Active Directory forms the backbone of a Windows network, it also forms the backbone of an Exchange Server 2007 deployment. Although mailbox data, including e-mail and calendar appointments, is stored on Exchange Server 2007 computers, Active Directory stores almost all of Exchange Server 2007’s configuration information.

Although, as discussed in Lesson 2, “Preparing the Servers for Exchange Installation,” the server that will host the Exchange Server 2007 installation needs to have a 64-bit processor and a 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2003 or later installed, the network infrastructure servers, such as domain controllers and DNS servers in the environment, can have 32-bit processors and the 32-bit edition of Windows Server 2003 or later installed. Although as a matter of good practice all servers in your environment should be patched with the most recent updates, the installation of Exchange Server 2007 requires that the server that hosts the Schema Master role be patched with Service Pack 1 or higher if running Windows Server 2003 or be running Windows Server 2003 R2 or later. Exchange Server 2007 requires that there be a global catalog server deployed in each site in which Exchange is deployed. These global catalog servers also must be patched with Service Pack 1 or higher if running Windows Server 2003 or be running Windows Server 2003 R2 or later.

Setting Domain and Forest Functional Levels

To get the most out of Exchange Server 2007, it is necessary to set the functional levels of the host Windows Active Directory environment to the highest level possible. There are two different types of functional level in Windows Server 2003: the domain functional level and the forest functional level. The available domain functional levels are the following:

  • Windows 2000 mixed This domain functional level supports Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003 domain controllers.
  • Windows 2000 native This domain functional level supports Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 domain controllers.
  • Windows Server 2003 interim This domain functional level supports only Windows Server 2003 and Windows NT 4.0 domain controllers.
  • Windows Server 2003 This domain functional level supports only Windows Server 2003 domain controllers.

Certain forest functional levels can be set only if all the domains in the forest are already set to a particular functional level. The available forest functional levels are the following:

  • Windows 2000 This forest functional level is available when domains in the forest are at any functional level.
  • Windows Server 2003 interim This forest functional level is available only when the minimum level of all domains in the forest is Windows Server 2003 interim.
  • Windows Server 2003 This forest functional level can be set only if all domains in the forest are set to the Windows Server 2003 functional level.

Raising functional levels is a one-way operation. Once the functional level is raised, you cannot return it to a previous level. If you raise the domain functional level to Windows Server 2003 and then discover that you want to add an extra Windows 2000 domain controller, you will have to upgrade that computer to Windows Server 2003.

MORE INFO Functional levels

To find out more about domain and forest functional levels, consult the following TechNet article: .



The primary limitation of raising the domain functional level is reducing the types of domain controllers that can be used in the domain. If a forgotten Windows NT4 or Windows 2000 domain controller exists in some far-flung office of your organization, raising the domain functional level could cause a problem. Prior to rolling out Exchange Server 2007, you will need to know what servers are located out in those remote offices and upgrade them if necessary. It makes no sense to have elaborate plans about rolling out Exchange Server 2007 when your existing infrastructure simply will not support it. All domains in the forest where you intend to install Exchange Server 2007 or host recipients must be set to the Windows 2000 Server domain functional level or higher. Raising domain and forest functional levels is covered by the practices at the end of this lesson.

NOTE Windows Server 2008 functional levels

Windows Server 2008 domains support the Windows 2000 native, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2008 domain functional levels and the Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2008 forest functional levels. This means that if you are installing Exchange Server 2007 in a forest with Windows Server 2008 domain controllers, you will not need to modify the functional levels to support the new Exchange organization.



Extending the Active Directory Schema

Active Directory schema is a set of formal definitions for all object classes that can exist within an Active Directory forest. As Exchange Server 2007 uses new objects that have not been formally defined in the existing schema, it is necessary to add the new definitions that are relevant to Exchange-specific objects to the existing Active Directory schema. This process is called schema extension and is the first step in all new Exchange Server 2007 deployments.

Setting Legacy Permissions

If your environment has an existing Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 organization present, it is necessary to run an extra command prior to performing the normal schema and domain preparation. Running this extra command will update existing Exchange settings and permissions in preparation for the modifications made by deploying Exchange Server 2007. The user who executes this command must be a member of the Enterprise Admins group. This command needs to be run from the root directory of the Exchange Server 2007 installation media. The syntax of the command is the following:

Setup /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions

Running the command as a member of the Enterprise Admins group will prepare all domains in the forest. It is possible to run this command against a single domain rather than all domains in the forest. If this is done, the user running the command must specify the fully qualified domain name of the domain, be a member of the Exchange Organization Administrators group, and be a member of the Domain Admins group in the domain to be prepared. For example, if Kim Akers wishes to prepare a child domain in the Tailspintoys.internal forest called child.tailspintoys.internal and she has the requisite group memberships, she would issue the following command:

Setup /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions:child.tailspintoys.internal

If the entire forest is not prepared and preparation is performed on a domain-by-domain basis, it will be necessary to run this command in all domains where Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 has been deployed, prior to performing any other steps in the Exchange Server 2007 deployment process. If this command is not run in all domains where Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 has been deployed by executing it either on the forest level or on a domain-by-domain basis, it is possible that the deployment will fail.

NOTE Running commands on 32-Bit computers

The version of setup.exe that comes with the Exchange Server 2007 installation media will run only on computers with a 64-bit operating system. In many environments, existing domain controllers will be running the 32-bit version of Windows Server 2003. This means that you can not run the setup.exe commands necessary to prepare the domain off the Exchange Server 2007 installation media, as it has been compiled for an alternate processor architecture. One way to deal with this problem is to obtain the 32-bit evaluation version of Exchange Server 2007 from Microsoft’s Web site. You can use the 32-bit evaluation edition to prepare the forest and domains prior to installing the full 64-bit edition of Exchange Server 2007. You can obtain the 32-bit evaluation software by navigating to and providing registration details. It is also possible to obtain the 64-bit Exchange Server 2007 evaluation from this location.



Preparing the Active Directory Schema from the Command Line

The Active Directory schema is extended by running the Setup /PrepareSchema command. This command must be run in the same site and domain as the computer that holds the schema master Flexible Single Master Operations (FSMO) role. Unless the Schema Master role has been moved, this server that hosts it will be located in the forest root domain on the first domain controller that was installed in the organization. You can locate the Schema Master using the technique detailed in Practice 2, “Extending the Active Directory Schema,” at the end of this lesson. Prior to running the command, you must ensure that the .NET Framework version 2.0 and Windows PowerShell are installed. The Active Directory schema is prepared for Exchange Server 2007 by issuing the following command:

Setup /PrepareSchema

This command can be successfully executed only by a user account that is a member of both the Schema Admins and the Enterprise Admins group. If there are earlier versions of Exchange in your environment and the /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions command has not been executed, Setup /PrepareSchema will automatically execute this command against the forest prior to extending the schema.

MORE INFO PowerShell version

Ensure that the version of PowerShell that you install is appropriate for your operating system. Separate versions of PowerShell are available for 32- and 64-bit editions of Windows as well as separate versions for Windows XP, Vista, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2008. The different versions of PowerShell can be obtained by navigating to the following link: .



Quick Check

  1. What are the minimum domain and forest functional levels required for the installation of Exchange Server 2007?
  2. What components must be installed to run Setup /PrepareSchema?
Quick Check Answers
  1. Windows 2000 native.
  2. Windows .NET Framework version 2.0 and Windows PowerShell.



Domain Preparation

Each domain that will host an Exchange Server 2007 computer or that will host Exchange recipients needs to be prepared using the Setup /PrepareAD command. The first time this command is run, you also have to include the organization name. For example, after Setup /PrepareSchema is run on the schema master of the Tailspin-toys.internal forest, Active Directory can be prepared for the deployment of the new Tailspintoys Exchange Server 2007 organization by running the following command:

Setup /PrepareAD /OrganizationName:Tailspintoys

In the event that the organization already exists, it is not necessary to append the /OrganizationName option.

Running this command will do the following:

  • Configure global Exchange objects in Active Directory
  • Create Exchange universal security groups in the root domain
  • Set permissions on Exchange configuration objects
  • Prepare the current domain

This command can be run only by a member of the Enterprise Administrators group. If there is an existing Exchange Server 2003 organization, the user running the command needs to be not only a member of the Enterprise Administrators group but also an Exchange full administrator.

Organization Name Limitations

The name that can be assigned to an Exchange organization has several limitations. An Exchange organization name cannot contain whitespaces at the beginning or the end, though it can contain whitespaces between characters. Usually, the Exchange organization reflects the name of the organization. In addition to the limitation on the use of whitespaces, Exchange organization names cannot contain any of the characters listed in Table 1-1.

Verifying Preparation

You can verify that the schema extension and domain preparation tasks have been completed correctly by viewing the output of the command-line utilities or by examining Active Directory Users and Computers in the forest root domain. If you examine Active Directory Users and Computers in the forest root domain, you will notice a new container called Microsoft Exchange Security Groups. Within that container are five new universal security groups with the following names:

  • Exchange organization administrators
  • Exchange recipient administrators
  • Exchange servers
  • Exchange view-only administrators
  • ExchangeLegacyInterop

Cc505892.table_C01624108_1(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Table 1-1 Symbols That Cannot Be Used in the Name of an Exchange Organization

The new container and security groups are displayed in Figure 1-1. These groups are used to assign Exchange Server 2007 roles, which are covered later in this lesson.

MORE INFO Preparing Active Directory and domains

For more information about preparing Active Directory and domains for the installation of Exchange Server 2007, consult the following article: .



Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_1(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 1-1 New Exchange objects

If you run the Exchange Server 2007 setup routine with a Windows account that has all the requisite permissions, the schema and domain preparation steps occur automatically. Given this, you might wonder why you would want to go manually through the command-line preparation steps. The answer is that going through the command-line preparation steps gives you a finer degree of control over the Exchange Server 2007 deployment process. Diagnosing problems in large, complex environments is more difficult if you try the “all at once” approach.

Local Server Role Requirements

Once you have prepared the schema and the domain, it is time to ensure that the location where you will place Exchange Server 2007 is suitably readied. A site is a set of IP subnets that are defined in Active Directory. Sites are configured using the Active Directory Sites And Services management console and are used to define distinct locations in an organization’s network. For example, you work for a company that has its head office in Melbourne, Australia, and regional offices in the outback towns of Wagga Wagga, Cootamundra, and Wangaratta. Each office would use one or more separate IP subnets. Using the Active Directory Sites And Services console, the subnets used by each office would be collected into Active Directory sites. Sites help facilitate replication between domain controllers.

Each site at which you plan to install an Exchange Server 2007 computer needs a Windows Server 2003 SP1+ or R2 global catalog server. Global catalog servers can be installed only on computers that are already domain controllers. It is not necessary for the domain controllers or global catalog servers to be running a 64-bit version of Windows Server 2003. Although a global catalog server always existed at each site in Windows 2000 domains, the Windows Server 2003 universal group membership caching feature means that there is not always a global catalog server at each site.

To make an existing domain controller a global catalog server, you need to open Active Directory Sites And Services, locate the server that you wish to convert under the Servers node, expand that node, and edit the NTDS Settings. On the General tab, ensure that the Global Catalog option is selected, as shown in Figure 1-2.

Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_2(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 1-2 Setting a domain controller to be a global catalog server

Configuring Exchange Administrator Roles

Once the schema and domain preparation commands have been issued, several new groups will be added to a new organizational unit in the root domain of the forest. These groups are universal in scope, meaning that user accounts from any domain in the forest can be added to them. Adding a user account to one of these groups confers the group role on that account. These roles have the following properties:

  • Exchange Organization Administrator A user who is a member of this group has complete access to all Exchange properties and objects within the organization.
  • Exchange Recipient Administrator A user assigned the Exchange Recipient Administrator role can edit Exchange properties on Active Directory objects. This includes user accounts, contacts, groups, dynamic distribution lists, and public folders. Exchange recipient administrators can also edit client access mailbox settings and unified messaging mailbox settings.
  • Exchange View-Only Administrator A user assigned the Exchange View-Only Administrator role has read-only access to the Exchange organization tree and read-only access to those domain controllers that host Exchange recipient objects. This role is used primarily for auditing purposes.
  • Exchange Server Administrator This role is different from other assigned roles because its scope is limited to a particular computer or computers running Exchange Server 2007. A user assigned the Exchange Server Administrator role for a specific Exchange Server 2007 computer cannot perform Exchange Server Administrator tasks on any other Exchange Server 2007 computer within the organization.

In addition, new security groups apply to computers in the Exchange organization. Computer accounts that are added to these groups have the following properties:

  • Exchange Servers All computers with Exchange Server 2007 installed are members of this group. Members of this group can manage the Exchange information store, mail queues, and mail interchange.
  • Exchange2003Interop This group is for Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003 bridgehead servers. It allows routing group connections between Exchange Server 2007 and earlier versions of Exchange.
  • Exchange Install Domain Servers This security group is located in the Microsoft Exchange System Objects container, which is visible only if the Advanced Features View option is enabled in Active Directory Users And Computers. This group contains all domain controllers with Exchange installed.

Link State and Coexistence with Previous Versions of Exchange

Prior to introducing Exchange Server 2007 to an existing Exchange environment, the existing Exchange environment must be prepared. This preparation involves either migrating data off existing servers and retiring them or ensuring that these servers have the most recent service packs and updates applied. Exchange Server 2007 can be introduced to the organization under the following conditions:

  • No Exchange Server 5.5 server is present in the forest. If Exchange Server 5.5 is present and you wish to deploy Exchange Server 2007, it will be necessary to migrate users and data off these servers to Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 prior to attempting to deploy the new version of Exchange. It is not possible to directly upgrade from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange Server 2003, or Exchange Server 2007.
  • All Exchange Server 2003 servers in the forest have Exchange Server 2003 Service Pack (SP) 2 or higher applied.
  • All Exchange 2000 Servers in the forest have Exchange 2000 Server SP3 and the SP3 update rollup (KB870540) installed.

In the event that two or more routing groups exist in an Exchange Server 2003 deployment in which you wish to deploy Exchange Server 2007, it will be necessary to disable link state. Link state is used to route traffic in large Exchange Server 2003 deployments. Exchange Server 2007 does not propagate link state routing updates. If an organization is configured to use two or more routing groups and Exchange Server 2007 is introduced, routing loops will occur. To disable link state in an existing Exchange Server 2003 organization, it is necessary to edit the registry on all Exchange 2000 and Exchange Server 2003 computers in the organization. It is necessary to add the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\ RESvc\Parameters\SuppressStateChanges and to set its DWORD value to 1.

It is not possible to directly upgrade a computer running Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange Server 2007. It is possible to migrate all the mailboxes off an earlier version of Exchange to Exchange Server 2007, perform a complete server rebuild, install Exchange Server 2007, and then migrate the mailboxes back, but a direct migration is impossible.

Exam Tip

The Exchange Server exams have always had a reputation for requiring a solid background knowledge of network infrastructure and Active Directory principles. Other Microsoft products, such as Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2006, Windows Software Update Services, and Microsoft Operations Manager, can make tangential appearances in exam questions. You do not need to know all the technical details of these products, but you do need to have a basic understanding of how they interrelate with an Exchange Server deployment.



Practice: Preparing the Network Infrastructure for the Installation of Exchange Server 2007

In these practices, you will perform several exercises by which you will become familiar with preparing your network infrastructure for the installation of Exchange Server 2007. Prior to beginning these practice exercises, you should have configured a Windows Server 2003 64-bit edition computer in the following way:

  • Configure the computer with the name Glasgow.
  • Configure a static IP address and subnet mask that allow access to the Internet in your local network environment.
  • Promote the computer to domain controller.
  • Ensure that you configure the new domain so that it exists in a new forest.
  • Configure the domain name to be Tailspintoys.internal
  • Ensure that Database, Log, and Sysvol files are hosted in default locations.
  • Configure the DNS service to be hosted locally.
  • Ensure that permissions are configured to be compatible only with Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003.
  • Configure the Administrator account password and Active Directory restore mode password as P@ssw0rd.
  • Download and install Windows Server 2003 SP2. This service pack can be applied to both Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2. Installing this service pack will also ensure that Microsoft Management Console (MMC) version 3.0 is present on your computer. Keep the SP2 file in a known location, as it will be necessary to reapply the service pack after adding additional components to Windows Server 2003.
  • This computer can run on its own hardware or within a virtual machine, though if it is running in a virtual machine, you must ensure that the host operating system is also 64 bit.

BEST PRACTICES Slipstreaming

It is possible to slipstream the service pack into the installation files of the nonevaluation versions of Windows Server 2003. The process of slipstreaming updates the original installation files. When the installation files have been updated via slipstreaming, it is not necessary to reapply the service pack after components have been added to Windows. It is not possible to perform a slipstream update the installation files of an evaluation version of Windows Server 2003.



Practice 1: Configuring Domain and Forest Functional Levels

In this practice, you will configure the domain and forest functional levels of your practice environment to Windows Server 2003 native. Setting this level will allow all features of Exchange Server 2007 to be implemented. To complete this practice, perform the following steps:

  1. Log on to the computer using the default Administrator account.
  2. Open Active Directory Users And Computers from the Administrative Tools menu. Right-click Tailspintoys.Internal and click Raise Domain Level from the shortcut menu as shown in Figure 1-3.

    Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_3(en-us,TechNet.10).png

    Figure 1-3 Raise domain functional level

  3. Set the new domain functional level to Windows Server 2003 and click Raise.
  4. In the Raise Domain Functional Level dialog box, click OK.
  5. Click OK to dismiss the notification informing you that the domain functional level was raised successfully.
  6. Close the Active Directory Users And Computers console.
  7. Open Active Directory Domains And Trusts from the Administrative Tools menu.
  8. Right-click Active Directory Domains And Trusts and then click Raise Forest Functional Level.
  9. Verify that Windows Server 2003 is selected in the Select An Available Forest Functional Level dialog box as shown in Figure 1-4 and then click Raise.

    Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_4(en-us,TechNet.10).png

    Figure 1-4 Raise forest functional level

  10. At the warning dialog box, click OK.
  11. Click OK to dismiss the message informing you that the functional level was raised successfully.
  12. Close Active Directory Domains And Trusts.

Practice 2: Extending the Active Directory Schema

The best place to extend the Active Directory schema is on the computer that holds the Schema Master role in the forest. In complicated Active Directory environments, you may need to locate the schema master. Although almost all the practices in this book involve a single computer that serves as domain controller, Exchange server, and holder of all FSMO roles, this practice will assume that you need to locate the schema master and then prepare it so that you can extend the schema. To complete this practice, perform the following steps:

  1. While logged on as administrator, click Start and then click Run.
  2. In the Run dialog box, type regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll.
  3. Click OK to dismiss the dialog box informing you that the registration of this DLL file has succeeded.
  4. In the Run dialog box, type MMC and then click OK.
  5. Add the Active Directory Schema snap-in to the new console.
  6. In the console, right-click Active Directory Schema and then click Operations Master. This will display the dialog box shown in Figure 1-5, which will inform you of which computer in the forest currently holds the Schema Master role.

    Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_5(en-us,TechNet.10).png

    Figure 1-5 Locating the schema master

  7. Close the console.

    TIP Find the schema master

    At this point in a production environment, you would log on to the schema master computer itself.



  8. Open the Add/Remove Programs item in Control Panel and then click Add/ Remove Windows Components.
  9. Select the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 component and then click Next. This component will be available in the component list if you have installed Windows Server 2003 SP2 for x64.
  10. Open Internet Explorer and navigate to .
  11. Locate and download the Windows PowerShell binary for Windows Server 2003 x64.

    BEST PRACTICES Do not surf from servers

    Best practice is not to browse the Internet directly from any server. In a production environment, you should use a desktop computer to obtain software that needs to be downloaded and then transfer the installation files across the network to the server.



  12. Double-click the Windows PowerShell installation file that you have downloaded from Microsoft’s Web site and install PowerShell by following the prompts.
  13. When the PowerShell installation routine completes, place the Exchange Server 2007 installation media into the DVD-ROM drive. If the Exchange Server 2007 screen is displayed, click Close.
  14. Click Start and open a command prompt from the Accessories menu.
  15. In the command prompt environment, change to the DVD-ROM drive and issue the command setup /prepareschema.
  16. During the schema preparation, the routine will check that the organization is at the appropriate functional levels and then extend the Active Directory schema.
  17. At the end of the schema preparation process, you should get a message informing you that the setup operation has completed successfully. If you do not get this message, verify that you have successfully completed all steps in Practices 1 and 2.

Practice 3: Performing Domain Preparation

Once the Active Directory schema has been prepared, you need to perform the domain preparation step. To complete this step, you need to use an account that is a member of the Enterprise Administrators group. For the purposes of this practice, the default Administrator account will suffice. To complete this practice, perform the following steps:

  1. Ensure that the Exchange Server 2007 installation media is still present in the computer’s DVD-ROM drive.
  2. Open a command prompt and change to the DVD-ROM drive.
  3. Enter the command setup /PrepareAD /OrganizationName:Tailspintoys
  4. When the command completes execution, you will receive the message displayed in Figure 1-6.

Cc505892.Figure_C01624108_6(en-us,TechNet.10).png

Figure 1-6 Successful completion of Active Directory preparation

Lesson Summary

  • Setup /PrepareLegacyExchange Permissions should be run if there is a preexisting Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 organization.
  • Setup /PrepareSchema must be run in the same Active Directory site and domain as the computer that hosts the Schema Master role.
  • Setup /PrepareAD must be run in all domains that will host Exchange servers or Exchange recipients.
  • If an existing Exchange 2000 or Exchange Server 2003 organization contains more than two routing groups, link state must be disabled.

Lesson Review

You can use the following questions to test your knowledge of the information in Lesson 1, “Preparing the Infrastructure for Exchange Installation.” The questions are also available on the companion CD if you prefer to review them in electronic form.

NOTE Answers

Answers to these questions and explanations of why each answer choice is correct or incorrect are located in the “Answers” section at the end of the book.



  1. You are intending to introduce Exchange Server 2007 to an existing network consisting of Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 domain controllers and Exchange 5.5, Exchange 2000, and Exchange Server 2003 servers. Which of the following steps must you take prior to introducing Exchange Server 2007?
    1. Upgrade all Windows 2000 Server domain controllers to Windows Server 2003
    2. Upgrade all Exchange 2000 servers to Exchange Server 2003
    3. Upgrade all Exchange 5.5 servers to Exchange Server 2003
    4. Migrate all users and data from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange Server 2003
  2. You are planning on installing a computer running Exchange Server 2007 at the Cootamundra branch office of Tailspintoys. The Tailspintoys forest has a single domain, and Exchange Server 2007 has already been deployed at the head office site. The Cootamundra office has a Windows Server 2003 R2 32-bit domain controller configured to use universal group membership caching, a Windows Server 2003 SP1 32-bit file server, and 20 desktop computers running Windows Vista enterprise edition. Exchange will be installed on a new server running Windows Server 2003 R2 64 bit with SP2. Which of the following configuration changes should you make prior to deploying Exchange Server 2007?
    1. Run Setup /Prepareschema on the Cootamundra domain controller
    2. Run Setup /PrepareAD on the Cootamundra domain controller
    3. Upgrade the Cootamundra domain controller to Windows Server 2003 R2 64-bit edition
    4. Configure the Cootamundra domain controller as a global catalog server
    5. Promote the Cootamundra file server to domain controller
  3. Which of the following groups must your user account be a member of to run the command Setup /PrepareSchema in a forest that does not have an existing Exchange deployment? (Choose all that apply.)
    1. Schema Admins
    2. Enterprise Admins
    3. Exchange Organization Administrators
    4. Domain Admins
    5. Account Operators
  4. Which of the following commands should you execute first if you are going to introduce Exchange Server 2007 to an existing Exchange Server 2003 environment?
    1. Setup /PrepareSchema
    2. Setup /PrepareAD
    3. Setup /PrepareLegacyExchangePermissions
    4. DCDIAG
    5. NETDIAG
  5. Which of the following Exchange Server 2007 organization names are valid?
    1. Tailspintoys-Corporation
    2. Tailspintoys_Corporation
    3. Tailspintoys:Corporation
    4. TailspintoysCorporation!
    5. Tailspintoys%Corporation
  6. Under what conditions is it necessary to disable link state prior to installing Exchange Server 2007 in an organization that already has an Exchange Server 2003 deployment?
    1. If Outlook Web Access is available on any of the Exchange Server 2003 computers
    2. If multiple routing groups are in use
    3. If multiple administrative groups are in use
    4. If a front-end/back-end configuration is in use
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