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5 Appendix A: Product Behavior

This document specifies version-specific details in the Microsoft .NET Framework. For information about which versions of .NET Framework are available in each released Windows product or as supplemental software, see .NET Framework.

The information in this specification is applicable to the following Microsoft products or supplemental software. References to product versions include released service packs:

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 1.0

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0

  • Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5

Exceptions, if any, are noted below. If a service pack or Quick Fix Engineering (QFE) number appears with the product version, behavior changed in that service pack or QFE. The new behavior also applies to subsequent service packs of the product unless otherwise specified. If a product edition appears with the product version, behavior is different in that product edition.

Unless otherwise specified, any statement of optional behavior in this specification that is prescribed using the terms SHOULD or SHOULD NOT implies product behavior in accordance with the SHOULD or SHOULD NOT prescription. Unless otherwise specified, the term MAY implies that the product does not follow the prescription.

<1> Section 2.1.1.5: In .NET Framework 1.0 and .NET Framework 1.1, the value of Kind is always set to 0 when writing. On reading, the value is ignored and assumed to be 0.

<2> Section 2.2.1.1: The bit value GenericMethod is valid only with .NET Framework 2.0, .NET Framework 3.0, .NET Framework 3.5, .NET Framework 4.0, and .NET Framework 4.5.

<3> Section 2.2.3.2: This is present only in .NET Framework 2.0, .NET Framework 3.0, .NET Framework 3.5, .NET Framework 4.0, and .NET Framework 4.5.

<4> Section 2.3.1.1: Windows uses a single counter that counts from 1 to generate the ObjectId in the ClassInfo, ArrayInfo, BinaryObjectString, and BinaryArrayrecords, and the LibraryId in the BinaryLibraryrecord. The maximum value is 2,147,483,647. If the object is of a Remoting Type that cannot be referenced in Windows, the negative of the counter value is used.

<5> Section 2.3.1.1: In Windows, the order of the Members can vary for each occurrence of the record for a given class.

<6> Section 2.4: Windows uses ObjectNullMultiple256 if the number of sequential Null Objects is 255 or fewer. Windows uses ObjectNullMultiple if the number of sequential Null Objects is greater than 255.

<7> Section 2.4.2.1: Windows uses a single counter that counts from 1 to generate the ObjectId in the ClassInfo, ArrayInfo, BinaryObjectString, and BinaryArrayrecords, and the LibraryId in the BinaryLibraryrecord. The maximum value is 2,147,483,647.

<8> Section 2.4.3.1: Windows uses a single counter that counts from 1 to generate the ObjectId in the ClassInfo, ArrayInfo, BinaryObjectString, and BinaryArrayrecords, and the LibraryId in the BinaryLibraryrecord. The maximum value is 2,147,483,647.

<9> Section 2.5.3: Windows places the record that defines the ID before or after the referencing record.

<10> Section 2.5.7: Windows uses a single counter that counts from 1 to generate the ObjectId in the ClassInfo, ArrayInfo, BinaryObjectString, and BinaryArrayrecords, and the LibraryId in the BinaryLibraryrecord. The maximum value is 2,147,483,647.

<11> Section 2.6.2: Windows uses a single counter that counts from 1 to generate the ObjectId in the ClassInfo, ArrayInfo, BinaryObjectString, and BinaryArrayrecords, and the LibraryId in the BinaryLibraryrecord. The maximum value is 2,147,483,647.

 
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