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6 Appendix A: Product Behavior

The information in this specification is applicable to the following Microsoft products or supplemental software. References to product versions include released service packs:

  • Windows 2000 operating system

  • Windows XP operating system

  • Windows Server 2003 operating system

  • Windows Vista operating system

  • Windows Server 2008 operating system

  • Windows 7 operating system

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system

  • Windows 8 operating system

  • Windows Server 2012 operating system

  • Windows 8.1 operating system

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 operating system

Exceptions, if any, are noted below. If a service pack or Quick Fix Engineering (QFE) number appears with the product version, behavior changed in that service pack or QFE. The new behavior also applies to subsequent service packs of the product unless otherwise specified. If a product edition appears with the product version, behavior is different in that product edition.

Unless otherwise specified, any statement of optional behavior in this specification that is prescribed using the terms SHOULD or SHOULD NOT implies product behavior in accordance with the SHOULD or SHOULD NOT prescription. Unless otherwise specified, the term MAY implies that the product does not follow the prescription.

<1> Section 1.3.2: In Windows 2000 Server, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, a constant list of exactly five user profile folders can be redirected, including My Documents, My Pictures, Desktop, Start Menu, and Application Data. In Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2, the set of folders that can be redirected is extensible and includes, by default, the additional folders Music, Videos, Favorites, Contacts, Downloads, Links, Saved Games, and Searches. The Group Policy: Folder Redirection Protocol Extension is not available on operating system versions earlier than Windows 2000 Server.

<2> Section 1.6: The Check Ownership flag (and, in Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2, the Exclusive Access flag) is enabled by default. A destination folder implemented over a Windows FAT32 File System will not provide the requisite operations. For more information, see section 2.2.2.2.1.

<3> Section 1.7: To illustrate, Windows implementations that support the folder redirection protocol also support relocating the My Documents user profile folder. Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2 also support relocating a new Favorites user profile folder. Thus, when the administrator uses the Folder Redirection Administrative-Side Plug-in to define folder redirection policies for My Documents and Favorites for a user, the administrative-side plug-in generates a Version One configuration file (described in section 2.2.2).

<4> Section 2.2.1.1: For each file with versions present in the source location of the user profile folder and in the redirected location, the version in the default location is copied to the redirected location only if its file system time stamp is newer than the version to be replaced.

<5> Section 2.2.1.1: For each file with versions present in the source location of the user profile folder and in the redirected location, the version in the default location is copied to the redirected location only if its file system time stamp is newer than the version to be replaced.

<6> Section 2.2.1.1: If the destination folder does not exist, the folder redirection subsystem creates the folder and modifies the file system ACL on the destination folder to ensure that only the user has access to the contents of the destination folder.

<7> Section 2.2.2: Version One configuration data was originally supported in Windows Vista. It is also supported in Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2, which will accept and process such a file.

<8> Section 2.2.2.1.1: Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2 support, by default, the 13 well-known user profile folders listed in section 1.9 and are vendor-extensible to support additional user profile folders.

<9> Section 2.2.2.2.1: For each file with versions present in the source location of the user profile folder and in the redirected location, the version in the default location is copied to the redirected location only if its file system time stamp is newer than the version to be replaced. Once the move is completed, the folder redirection subsystem deletes the user profile folder and all its contents from the source location.

<10> Section 2.2.2.2.1: If this flag is not set, the folder redirection subsystem prevents the user from explicitly changing how this user profile folder is redirected. If this flag is set, the folder redirection subsystem allows the user to change where the user profile is redirected.

<11> Section 2.2.2.2.1: If the destination folder already exists, and the security descriptor on the folder is protected, the folder redirection subsystem will not set the file system access control list on the destination folder, even if this flag is set.

<12> Section 2.2.2.2.1: The folder redirection subsystem remembers the setting of this flag as well as the security group associated with the Per-Profile mapping that establishes the folder redirection. At some later time, if the folder redirection subsystem learns via Group Policy that the user no longer belongs to the security group that established the previous redirection, and the previous redirection configuration had the Relocate On Move flag set, then the folder redirection subsystem moves the contents of the user profile folder from the previously configured destination to the default destination for the user profile folder. This destination is typically a directory on the local computer file system.

<13> Section 3.1.4.2: In Windows 2000 Server, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, the administrative-side plug-in stores only a Version Zero file. In Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2, the administrative-side plug-in stores both a Version One file and a Version Zero file.

<14> Section 3.2.1: In Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, the removal policy configuration is persisted in:

  • %USERPROFILE%\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Windows\File Deployment\{25537BA6-77A8-11D2-9B6C-0000F8080861}.ini

In Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2, the removal data is stored under this registry key:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\<User's SID>\fdeploy\

Under that key, there is a REG_DWORD value for each redirected folder. The folders are identified by their well-known user profile folder GUIDs (see section 1.9), and the values are set using the flags defined in section 2.2.2.2.1.

<15> Section 3.2.1: In Windows, this is not configured by default. It can be configured via Group Policy settings, and the default behavior can be modified in the computer-specific Registry Policy file in the following location.

Key: Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

Value: SyncForegroundPolicy

Type: REG_DWORD

Size: 4

Data:

  • Wait for network: 0x1

  • Don’t wait for network: 0x0

<16> Section 3.2.5.2: Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2 follow the recommended behavior, trying first Version One and then, if the Version One file is not present in the GPO pathfolder, trying Version Zero of the protocol. Windows 2000 Server, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 follow the alternative behavior, implementing only Version Zero of the protocol.

<17> Section 3.2.5.3: Windows interprets the value as a file system path in which components are delimited by the backslash "\" character. By convention, substrings of the path of the form %USERNAME% are understood to be replaced by the value of an operating system environment variable before the path is interpreted by the operating system file subsystem.

 
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