<job> Element

Marks the beginning and the end of a job within a Windows Script file (*.wsf).


                      <job [id=JobID]>
    job code
</job> 

JobID

Optional. Uniquely identifies the job within the scope of the Windows Script file.

Each JobID within a Windows Script file must be unique.

Each script within a set of job tags is executed in sequence, from top to bottom.

A job contains one or more script blocks. A script block is any script code between a set of <script> tags. A script block can contain several scripts, and each script can be in a different scripting language.

To run a specific job or to run multiple jobs, use the //Job switch. If you specify more than one job, the jobs are executed in sequential order. (This is shown in the example below.). If you do not specify a job, only the first job is run. If you have two or more jobs in your Windows Script file, they must be enclosed in a <package> tag.

The following script example is a Windows Script file called myScript.wsf. This file contains two separate jobs, each written in a different scripting language. The first job, written in VBScript, is given the identifier DoneInVBS. The second job, written in JScript, is given the identifier DoneInJS.

<package>
    <job id="DoneInVBS">
    <?job debug="true"?>
        <script language="VBScript">
           WScript.Echo "This is VBScript"
        </script>
    </job>
    <job id="DoneInJS">
    <?job debug="true"?>
        <script language="JScript">
           WScript.Echo("This is JScript"); 
        </script>
    </job>
</package>

To run the second job in the Windows Script file, myScript.wsf, type the following at the command prompt.

cscript myScript.wsf //job:DoneInJS

To run both jobs in myScript.wsf, type the following at the command prompt.

cscript myScript.wsf //job:DoneInVBS //job:DoneInJS

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