Designing Navigation Bars in Microsoft Visual InterDev 6.0

Visual Studio 6.0
 

Microsoft Corporation

August 1998


Summary: Contains examples and tricks for creating navigation bars in Microsoft Visual InterDev version 6.0. (48 printed pages) Also discusses how to customize layouts and themes to enhance your Web page content and visual presentation. You can view the information contained in this article in two ways: as a plain document or as an interactive Web application (available for download).

Preface

This article provides in-depth information about navigation bars, themes, and layouts, and serves as a sample Web application. As a working Web application, the site illustrates the concepts discussed on these pages.

The Designing Navigation Bars sample Web application is best viewed using Microsoft® Internet Explorer 4.01 or later. Visit the Microsoft Internet Explorer Web site http://www.microsoft.com/ie/ for information about obtaining the latest version of Internet Explorer. To experiment with the sample Web application, download the files.

This article does not discuss databases or displaying data in Web pages, but instead focuses on the position of content, the visual appearance, and the use of navigation bars on pages.

We also created this article in Microsoft Visual InterDev® 6.0 using .htm files. You can view the source and script for each page by downloading the files to your local machine.

This article consists of the following three major sections. Each section contains information to help you create and customize navigation bars, layouts, and themes in your Web application. We also provide examples whenever possible.

Navigation Bars

Covers creating navigation bars using a combination of site diagrams, the PageNavbar control, script, and custom HTML. See examples of how to create navigation bars that use DHTML and scriptlets and get a behind-the-scenes look at creating frame-based navigation bars.

Layouts

Covers creating and modifying the elements that comprise a Visual InterDev layout. See examples of how to create layouts that include other files and get a behind-the-scenes look at creating a layout that uses expanding table cells.

Themes

Covers creating a new Visual InterDev theme. See examples of how to modify existing themes and tips for versioning your custom themes.

Navigation Bars

Navigation bars, or "navbars," display the hyperlinks related to the current page using textual and graphical elements. Navigation bars can be positioned at the top, left, right, or bottom of a page or in any combination of the above. For example, this page contains three functional navigation bars at the top of the page. The first navigation bar is the standard Microsoft navbar that allows you to access the main sections of the Microsoft Web site. The second navigation bar allows you to access the main sections of this article. The third navigation bar displays links to the three subsections within the main Navbar section of the article.

You can customize navigation bars to use different fonts, colors, and graphics to fit the design and purpose of the Web site.

Navbars can be simple text hyperlinks:

Or graphical hyperlinks:

In Visual InterDev you add navigation bars to your pages using layouts and the PageNavbar design-time control. You design your navigation links using site diagrams. The flexibility of the PageNavbar control allows you to create custom navigation bars using JavaScript, DHTML, and scriptlets. Site diagrams allow you to visually prototype and modify the navigation structure for your Web application by creating parent, child, and sibling relationships between pages.

In the Navbar section we'll discuss the following:

Layouts

Layouts provide an easy method of positioning page elements, such as navigation bars and page content, consistently on your Web pages. You can even use Visual InterDev to automatically apply a layout to all new pages added to the project.

In Visual InterDev a layout is an .htm file that uses the Layout design-time controls to position page elements. Each page uses a single layout, but each Web project can use multiple layouts. Visual InterDev provides more than 15 different layouts for each page. You can use the existing layouts or you can create your own custom layouts.

In the Layouts section, we'll talk about:

Themes

Microsoft Visual InterDev provides more than 50 professionally designed themes for you to use in your Web application. Visual InterDev themes use a combination of cascading style sheets and graphics to create a consistent visual appearance. You can use these themes as is or you can modify them to meet your needs. You can also create new themes.

For more information about cascading style sheets, see the W3C's Web site at http://www.w3.org/style and the "CSS Attributes" section of the Platform SDK.

In the Themes section, we'll talk about:

Creating Navbars

In Visual InterDev you create navigation bars by applying layouts or adding the PageNavbar control to a page and then designing the navigation structure for a page. Site diagrams provide a graphical method of designing the navigation structure for a Web application. The PageNavbar control uses the navigation structure to identify the parent, child, and sibling links for a page. The graphic below is a site diagram showing a portion of the navigation structure for this Web application. For example, the Navbar page in the navigation structure shown below has three child pages: Creating Navbars, Customizing Navbars, and Navbar Samples.

Once you have added navigation bars to a page and designed the navigation structure, you can then select which links appear on each navigation bar. The PageNavbar Properties dialog box allows you to specify which links appear on the navigation bar based on the navigation structure you create for each page. For example, you would select the Sibling pages option in the dialog box below to create the third navigation bar on this page. As you can see in the preceding site diagram, the Creating Navbars, Customizing Navbars, and Navbar Samples pages are siblings of each other in the navigation structure.

In this section we'll talk about:

What Is a Navbar?

At the most basic level, a navigation bar is simply a series of hyperlinks to other pages displayed as text or images or a combination of both. In Visual InterDev you add the PageNavbar design-time control to a page and then use site diagrams to design the navigation structure for the Web site to design navigation bars.

Navigation bars can appear as simple text:

Or graphical buttons:

Or even DHTML:

When you work on a page in the HTML editor, navigation bars appear as the PageNavbar control icon. For example, the navigation bars for this page are shown here as they appear in the HTML editor.

Creating navigation bars consists of the following steps:

  • Adding navbars to a page
  • Creating a site diagram
  • Defining the navigation bar links

Adding a Navbar to a Page

You can add navigation bars to your Web pages in two ways: automatically or manually. Applying a layout to your Web pages automatically adds the PageNavbar design-time control to a page. If you do not want to use layouts, you can also drag the PageNavbar control from the Toolbox onto a page.

To apply a layout to your Web project

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click the project name.
  2. From the shortcut menu, select Properties.
  3. In the dialog box, select the Appearance tab.
  4. Under Default Theme and Layout, select Change to specify a layout.

To add the PageNavbar control to a single page

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click the page and select Open.
  2. From the Toolbox, select the Design-Time Controls tab.
  3. Drag the PageNavbar control onto the page.
Note   If the PageNavbar control does not appear on the Toolbox, add the control to the Toolbox using the Customize Toolbox dialog box available from the Tools menu.

Creating a Site Diagram

Site diagrams allow you to define the navigation structure for a Web application. The navigation structure determines what links appear on the navigation bar when you select parent, child, sibling, or global type links. Each page must appear in a site diagram if you intend to use the PageNavbar control to create navigation bars for your Web application.

To create a site diagram

  1. From the Project menu, select Add Item.
  2. On the New tab, select the Web Project Files folder and then select Site Diagram from the pane on the right.
  3. In the Name text box, type a name for the site diagram.
  4. Click Open.

You can also add existing pages to the site diagram or create new pages in the site diagram.

Defining the Navbar Links

You can use the PageNavbar Properties dialog box to define the links that will appear on the navigation bar for each page.

To define navigation bar links for a page

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click the page and select Open.
  2. In the HTML editor, right click the PageNavbar control graphic and select Properties.
  3. On the General tab, choose between the hierarchical relationships in the Type area.
  4. Select additional options on the Appearance and Advanced tabs and then click OK.
Note   The graphic on the General tab of the PageNavbar Properties dialog box illustrates the relationship and the links that will appear on the navigation bar based on the hierarchy you choose.

Customizing Navbars

In Visual InterDev you can customize navigation bars to use different fonts, colors, and graphics to fit the design of the Web site. You can also include custom HTML to generate navigation bar links using JavaScript, DHTML, or scriptlets. The flexibility of the PageNavbar control allows you to continue using any existing HTML, script, fonts, or graphics you have to create navigation bars.

In this section, we'll talk about the ways you can customize navigation bars using:

Using Tokens

The PageNavbar control allows you to use replaceable parameters, called tokens, to help you create custom navigation bars. Tokens act as placeholders for information that is provided at run time, such as the exact URL or theme for a page. The HTMLFragment and CurrentHTMLFragment properties of the PageNavbar control accept tokens.

You can also use tokens on the Appearance tab of the PageNavbar Properties dialog box in the Link template and Current page template options.

The Link template and Current page template properties provide several examples to give you an idea of the ways to use tokens. For example, the following custom HTML creates a standard text link to a URL:

<a href=#URL#>#LABEL#</a> 

The text used for the link will be the label assigned to the page in the site diagram. The URL used for the link will be the URL of the page. Instead of manually entering in the URL and link text information, the tokens allow you to simply specify the type of information that should be inserted.

The following table lists the tokens available for the PageNavbar control.

Token Description
#URL# Inserts the URL for each link in your custom HTML at run time.
#LABEL# Inserts the page label for each link.
#CLASS# Inserts the CSS class for the selected type of navigation bar.
#THEME# Inserts the current theme settings for the link.

Adding JavaScript

You can use JavaScript to create custom navigation bars for your pages. This flexibility can be especially useful if you have existing JavaScript that creates navigation bars.

Example 1: Status bar text

This example shows how to create a text link that displays the label for the URL in the status bar when the user moves the cursor over the link. This JavaScript example is available by default from the Link template option on the Appearance tab of the PageNavbar Properties dialog box.

  • In the Properties window, enter the following in the HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control:
    <a href=#URL# onmouseover="window.status='#LABEL#'; return true;">#LABEL#</a>
    
  • In the Appearance property, select 2-HTML from the drop-down list.

Move the cursor over the links and look at your browser's status bar as shown in the following example.

Example 2: Message box

This example shows how to create a message box that displays the label for the link when the user selects the link. This example uses a combination of custom HTML in both the PageNavbar control and the actual .htm or .asp file.

  • Place the following script in your Web page:
    <script>
    function do_something (LABEL) {
         alert("You clicked on " + LABEL+ ".");
    }
    </script> 
    
    
  • In the Properties window, enter the following in the HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control:
    <input type=button onclick="do_something('#LABEL#')" value=#LABEL#>
    
  • In the Appearance property, select 2-HTML from the drop-down list.

    Click each button to display the message box as shown in the following example.

Adding DHTML

You can use DHTML to create custom navigation bars for your Web application. DHTML is an extension of HTML, supported in Internet Explorer 4.0 and later, that exposes a Web page and all the elements on it as scriptable objects. DHTML allows you to dynamically change the appearance, content, and behavior of a Web page directly in client script, without running server script. For more information, see the DHTML sections of the MSDN Library documentation.

Example 1: Change link color

This example shows how to create a navigation bar that changes link color when a user moves the mouse pointer over a link.

  • In the Properties window, enter the following in the HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control:
    <a href=#URL#><span style="color: black;"
    onmouseover="this.style.color='red'"
    onmouseout="this.style.color='black'">#LABEL#</span></a>
    
  • In the Appearance property, select 2-HTML from the drop-down list.

Move the cursor over the links to view the color change as shown in the following example.

Example 2: Change button colors

This example shows how to create a navigation bar that changes the background color of the button as well as the color of the text when the user moves the mouse pointer over the button.

  • Enter the following style information on your page:
    <style>
    .off { 
       color: black; 
       width: 100; 
       height: 20; 
       text-align: center; 
       border: 1 solid black; 
       background-color: tan; 
       margin-left: 30px; 
    } 
    .on { 
       color: red; 
       width: 100; 
       height: 20; 
       text-align: center; 
       border: 1 solid red; 
       background-color: black; 
       margin-left: 30px; 
    }
    </style>
    
    
  • Enter the following script information on your page:
    <script>
    function navbar_rollon () {
       window.event.srcElement.className = 'on';
    }
    
    function navbar_rolloff () {
       window.event.srcElement.className = 'off';
    }
    </script>
    
    
  • In the Properties window, enter the following in the HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control:
    <div class=off onclick="location.href='#URL#'" onmouseover="navbar_rollon()" onmouseout="navbar_rolloff()">#LABEL#</div> 
    
    
  • In the Appearance property, select 2-HTML from the drop-down list. In the Orientation property, select 1-Vertical from the drop-down list.

Move the cursor over the links to view the color changes as shown in the following example.

Adding Scriptlets

You can use scriptlets to create custom navigation bars for your Web application.

Example 1: Preview window

This example details how to create a navigation bar that shows a preview of each destination page within the navbar as you move the mouse pointer over the navbar links. The URL for the links appears above the preview window.

  • Place the following script on your page:
    <script language="JavaScript"> 
    function show_url(enteredURL) { 
       tableHeading.innerText = "Showing " + enteredURL; 
       preview.showurl(enteredURL); 
    } 
    </script> 
    
  • Create a table to display the Preview window by adding the following HTML to your page:
    <table border=1>
    <tr><td align="middle"> Preview Window</td>
    </tr>
    <tr><td id="tableHeading" align="middle">Mouse Over to Preview</td>
    </tr>
    <tr><td align="middle">
    <OBJECT id=preview Width=400 Height=100
    type=text/x-scriptlet VIEWASTEXT>
    <PARAM NAME="URL" VALUE="Scriptlet.htm">
    <PARAM NAME="Scrollbar" VALUE="0">
    </OBJECT>
    </td>
    </tr>
    <tr><td align="middle">
    <input type="button" value="Close Window" onclick="window.close()">
    </td>
    </tr>
    </table>
    
    
  • Create the file scriptlet.htm with the following contents:
    <html> 
    <head> 
    <title>URL filler</title> 
    <script language="JavaScript"> 
    function public_showurl(enteredURL) { 
       scriptlet.navigate(enteredURL); 
    } 
    </script> 
    </head> 
    <frameset> 
       <frame src="" name=scriptlet scrolling=yes> 
    </frameset> 
    </html>
    
    
  • In the Properties window, enter the following in the HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control:
    [<a href="#URL#" onMouseover="show_url('#URL#')"> [#LABEL#] </a> ]
    

Navbar Samples

You can customize your navigation bars by using script, graphics, and fonts. The different types of navigation bars that you can create are almost endless. From a simple child navigation bar to the more complex drop-down menus, your only prerequisite is knowing how to use the PageNavbar control and site diagrams to create the desired effect.

This section contains samples of different types of navigation bars you can create with Visual InterDev.

In this section you'll see how to create:

Expanding Table of Contents

This sample creates an expanding table of contents navigation bar for your pages.

Behind the Scenes

This downloadable sample contains the following files:

  • ExpandingTOC.wdm defines the links on the navigation bars.
  • Default.htm is the home page for the sample company.
  • The Downloads, Locations, and Products files create the different levels in the table of contents.

ExpandingTOC.wdm

ExpandingTOC.wdm contains the site diagram used to create the navigation structure. Products, Locations, and Downloads each have three child pages.

Default.htm

Default.htm uses script and the PageNavbar control to create the expandable table of contents navigation bar.

The following script appears in default.htm:

function show_children (INLABEL) { 
   if (eval(INLABEL+".shown") == 1) { 
      eval(INLABEL+".innerHTML = ''"); 
      eval(INLABEL+".shown = 0"); 
   } 
   else { 
      var loc = INLABEL + "_navbar"; 
      var text = eval(loc+".innerHTML"); 
      eval(INLABEL+".innerHTML = text"); 
      eval(INLABEL+".shown = 1"); 
   } 
} 

For this sample, four PageNavbar controls are used to simulate the expanding table of contents navigation bar. One control is used to display the initial list of unexpanded links.

The other three PageNavbar controls are used to display the expanded list of links. When the user clicks a link on the initial navigation bar, the show_children function is called, causing the appropriate expanded link navigation bar to reveal itself on the page.

The PageNavbar control that displays the initial list of links is placed in a table. Next, the following HTML is added to the HTMLFragment property:

<td width=140 height=60 onclick="show_children('#LABEL#')" style="cursor: hand;" class="mstheme-vert-navtxt-g">#LABEL#</td></tr><tr><td><span id=#LABEL#></span></td></tr> 

The three PageNavbar controls that display the expanded list of links are surrounded by a <SPAN> tag that contains the following properties:

  • An ID equal to the label of the navigation bar
  • A style property of style="display: none"

For example:

<span id=Products_navbar style="display: none">

The three controls are also surrounded by <ul></ul> tags so that the expanded links appear as a bulleted list.

Each of the three PageNavbar controls uses the following custom HTML in the HTMLFragment property:

<li><a href=#URL#>#LABEL#</a></li> 

The PageNavbar that displays the expanded product links uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/ExpandingTOC/products.htm 

The PageNavbar that displays the expanded location links uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/ExpandingTOC/Locations.htm 

The PageNavbar that displays the expanded download links uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/ExpandingTOC/Downloads.htm 

Drop-Down Menus

Drop-down menus can give your users the look and feel of a standard Microsoft Windows application, written entirely in DHTML. This sample shows how to create drop-down menu navigation bars on your page.

Behind the Scenes

This downloadable sample contains the following files:

  • Menus.wdm contains the navigation structure for the navigation bars.
  • Default.htm is the home page for the site.
  • Script.js contains the custom HTML for the navigation bar.
  • Layout.htm contains a reference to script.js.
  • The Products, Locations, and Downloads files create the different menus in the navigation bar.

Menus.wdm

Menus.wdm is used to create the navigation structure for the navigation bars. For drop-down menus, you create a site diagram with multiple levels. The top-level menu relates to the children of the home page, while the contents of the drop-down menus relates to the children of the first-level pages. For each top-level menu item, you add an additional hidden navigation bar to your page.

Script.js

Script.js contains custom DHTML used to generate the drop-down menu effect of the navigation bar. By placing script.js in the _Layouts\MenuLayout folder, the script file is made available to any page that uses the MenuLayout layout.

Script.js contains the following code:

menu = new Object(); 
var sOpenMenuID = ""; 
var nMenuName = ""; 
var iTimerID; 

function doMenu() { 
   var eSrc = window.event.srcElement; 
   window.event.cancelBubble = true; 
   if (sOpenMenuID != "") { 
      nMenuName = sOpenMenuID.substring(0,sOpenMenuID.length-7); 
      document.all[nMenuName].style.display = "none"; 
      menu.shown = ""; 
   } 
   if (eSrc.className=="clsMenuTitleHover") { 
      eSrc.className = "clsMenuTitleClick"; 
      var nMenuName = eSrc.innerText; 
      sOpenMenuID = nMenuName + "_Hidden"; 
      var eMenuText = document.all[sOpenMenuID].innerHTML; 
      document.all[nMenuName].innerHTML = eMenuText; 
      document.all[nMenuName].style.clip = "rect(0 0 0 0)"; 
      document.all[nMenuName].style.display = "block"; 
      menu.shown = nMenuName; 
      menu.click = eSrc.id; 
      nChunk = 25; 
      iTimerID = window.setTimeout("showMenu(" + nMenuName + "),10"); 
   } 
   else { 
      if (menu.shown) { 
         document.all[menu.shown].style.display = "none"; 
         document.all[menu.click].className = "clsMenuTitle"; 
      } 
      show_hover(); 
   } 
}

var nChunk; 

function showMenu(eMenu) { 
   eMenu.style.clip = "rect(0 100% " + nChunk + "% 0)"; 
   nChunk +=25; 
   if (nChunk <= 100) { 
      iTimerID = window.setTimeout("showMenu(" + eMenu.id + "),10"); 
   } 
   else { 
      window.clearTimeout(iTimerID); 
   } 
} 

function show_hover () { 
   var eSrc = window.event.srcElement; 
   if (eSrc.className == "clsMenuTitle") { 
      if (menu.shown) { 
         document.all[menu.shown].style.display = "none"; 
         document.all[menu.click].className = "clsMenuTitle"; 
         nMenuName = eSrc.id.substring(3,eSrc.id.length); 
         if (nMenuName) { 
            eSrc.className = "clsMenuTitleClick"; 
            sOpenMenuID = nMenuName + "_Hidden"; 
            var eMenuText = document.all[sOpenMenuID].innerHTML; 
            document.all[nMenuName].innerHTML = eMenuText; 
            document.all[nMenuName].style.clip = "rect(0 0 0 0)"; 
            document.all[nMenuName].style.display = "block"; 
            menu.shown = nMenuName; menu.click = eSrc.id; 
            nChunk = 25; 
            iTimerID = window.setTimeout("showMenu(" + nMenuName + "),10"); 
         } 
      }
      else { 
         eSrc.className = "clsMenuTitleHover"; 
      } 
   } 
   else if (eSrc.className == "Menu") { 
      eSrc.className = "MenuHover"; 
   } 
} 

function hide_hover () { 
   var eSrc = window.event.srcElement; 
   if (eSrc.className == "clsMenuTitleHover") { 
      eSrc.className = "clsMenuTitle"; 
   } 
   else if (eSrc.className == "MenuHover") { 
      eSrc.className = "Menu"; 
   } 
}

This script contains four functions used to create the drop-down menu navigation bar effect.

The layout.htm file located in _Layouts/MenuLayout contains a reference to script.js. Each page that uses this layout has access to the script.

Default.htm

For this sample, four PageNavbar controls are used to simulate the drop-down menu effect for the navigation bar. One control is used to display the menu names.

The other three PageNavbar controls are used to display the menu options.

The PageNavbar control that displays the initial menu names is placed within a <div> tag and a table.

<div class=top>
<table>
<tr>
[PageNavbar control here]
<td align=center>
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</div>

The following custom HTML was then added to the PageNavbar control:

<td align=center><div class=top><div id=top#LABEL# class="clsMenuTitle: onmouseover="show_hover()" onmouseout="hide_hover()">#LABEL#</div><div id=#LABEL# class="clsMenu"></div></div></td>

The control that displays the initial menu names also uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/Menus/default.htm

Each of the PageNavbar controls that display the menu options are enclosed in a <div> tag that contains the following properties:

  • An ID equal to the label of the navigation bar
  • A style property of style="Display: none"

For example:

<div ID="Products_Hidden" style="Display: none">

Each of the three controls also use the following custom HTML in the HTMLFragment property:

<span style="width:140;" class=Menu onclick="location.href='#URL#'" onmouseover='show_hover()' onmouseout='hide_hover()'>#LABEL#</span>

The PageNavbar that displays the Products menu options uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/Menus/Products.htm

The PageNavbar that displays the Locations menu options uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/Menus/Locations.htm

The PageNavbar that displays the Downloads menu options uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Samples/NavBars/Menus/Downloads.htm

Frames

Many Web sites use frames to position content and navigation bars on a page. This sample shows how to create frame-based navigation bars on your page.

Behind the Scenes

This downloadable sample contains the following files located in the Samples\NavBars\Frames folder:

  • Frames.wdm defines the navigation bar links.
  • TopFrame.htm contains the navigation bar for the top frame.
  • LeftFrame.htm contains the navigation bars for the left frame.
  • Default.htm is the home page for the sample company.
  • Blank.htm allows default.htm to appear empty when you first view the page in the browser.
  • The Downloads, Locations, and Products files create the different links on the navigation bars.

Frames.wdm

Frames.wdm is used to create the navigation structure for the navigation bars.

TopFrame.htm

TopFrame.htm uses a single PageNavbar control and script to display the main navigation bar.

The following script was added to TopFrame.htm:

<script> 
function loadFrame (label,inURL) { 
   parent.content.location.href = inURL; 
   var text = eval("parent.left."+label+".innerHTML"); 
   parent.left.show.innerHTML = text; 
} 
</script> 

The PageNavbar control is placed in a table. The HTMLFragment property of the PageNavbar control in TopFrame.htm contains the following HTML:

<td width=137 height=60 onclick="loadFrame('#LABEL#','#URL#')" class=mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g style="cursor: hand;">#LABEL#</td>

The AlternatePage property is set to the following:

Default.htm

LeftFrame.htm

LeftFrame.htm contains three PageNavbar controls and is used to display the navigation bars in the left frame.

Each PageNavbar control is surrounded by a <span> tag that contains the following properties:

  • An ID equal to the label of the navigation bar
  • A style property of style="display: none"

For example:

<span id="Products" style="display: none">

The HTMLFragment property of each PageNavbar control in LeftFrame.htm contains the following HTML:

<tr><td width=140 height=60
onclick="parent.content.location.href='#URL#'" 
class=mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g style="cursor: hand;">
<a href=#URL# style="text-decoration: none" target=content>#LABEL#</a></td></tr>

The PageNavbar that displays the links for Products uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Products.htm

The PageNavbar that displays the links for Locations uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Locations.htm

The PageNavbar that displays the links for Downloads uses the following in the AlternatePage property:

Downloads.htm

The following <span> is added to the page just before the </Body> tag:

<span id="show">
</span>

Default.htm

Default.htm contains the following HTML:

<FRAMESET row="70,*" border=0><FRAME src="topframe.htm" name="top">

<FRAMESET cols"180, *" border=0><FRAME src="leftframe" name="left"><FRAME src="Blank.htm" name="content">
</FRAMESET>
</FRAMESET>

This HTML creates the framesets used to display the top and left navigation bars as well as the page content.

Creating Layouts

Layouts provide a means to manage the regions on a page and determine what content appears in those regions. Each page has five basic regions: top, left, bottom, right, and content. Layouts allow you to customize placement of content on your Web pages and at the same time create a consistent and professional appearance. The layouts available with Visual InterDev also determine the placement of navigation bars on a page.

In this section we'll talk about:

What Is a Layout?

A layout is a set of files that act as a template for the placement of navigation bars and content on a page. Each page can use only one layout, but each Web application can use multiple layouts. Layouts define how you use the five regions of a page shown here.

In Visual InterDev layout files are organized in individual folders under the _Layouts directory. By default, a layout folder contains three files.

File name Description
Layout.htm Contains the actual HTML applied to the file when you choose a layout.
Name.inf Provides information used by the Apply Theme and Layout dialog box to display the list of available layouts.
Preview.htm Contains an example of the layout that you view when choosing a layout from the Apply Theme and Layout dialog box.

Layouts insert HTML into pages to specify the position of the navigation bars and content on a page.

Creating Simple Layouts

You can create your own layouts to meet the specific needs of your Web application. Layouts consist of three files organized in a single folder under the _Layouts directory. To define your own layout, you must create:

  • A layout folder
  • A name.inf file
  • A layout.htm file
  • A preview.htm file

Creating a Layout Folder

The first step in creating your own layout is to create a folder to hold your layout files. Layouts can be stored on the client or server. Each layout can be used in either individual or multiple projects.

By default, layouts are located under the _Layouts directory in your Web project. The _Layouts directory is created automatically when you apply a Visual InterDev layout to a page.

To create a new layout folder

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click the _Layouts folder and select New Folder.
Note   If you have not applied a layout to the Web project or to a page, the _Layouts folder does not appear in the Project Explorer. We recommend that you apply a layout to a page to create the _Layouts folder.
  1. In the Folder name option, enter the name of the layout and select OK.

If you want to use the layout in multiple Web projects, you must add the folder to your local machine in the drive:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio\Vinterdev98\Layouts\ directory.

Creating the .inf File

After you have created your new layout folder you should create the name.inf file. The .inf file must use the same name as your layout directory.

This name.inf file needs to contain the following information.

Item name Description
[Info] Serves as the start line for the file.
Title=layoutname Specifies the title that appears for the layout in the Apply Themes and Layouts dialog box.
Version=versionnumber Specifies the version number for the layout. Newer versions overwrite older versions.
Description=preview.htm Identifies the file that will appear in the Preview section of the Apply Themes and Layouts dialog box for the layout.

To create a name.inf file

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click the new layout folder, select Add, and then select Add Item.
  2. In the Name box, enter the name of the layout folder and change the file extension to .inf.
  3. Open the file and delete the contents.

    Enter the following:

    [Info]
    

    Title= layoutname

    Version= number

    Description=Preview.htm

Creating a Layout.htm File

You can customize an existing layout.htm file or you can create a new layout.htm file from scratch. The layout.htm file contains several sections: a header, a footer, and the surrounding content. The header and footer sections are created using the Layout Header and Layout Footer design-time controls. A rough example of the sections for the layout.htm file is shown here.

  • Header Start
  • Header End
  • Content
  • Footer Start
  • Footer End

The Layout controls can be added to the Toolbox using the Customize Toolbox dialog box available from the Tools menu. Once you have added the header and footer sections you can then add page elements in the header and footer sections, such as the PageNavbar control. The graphics below show how the Layout Header Start and Layout Header End controls appear on a page.

For this example, we will create a layout that uses a banner to display the page title.

To create a layout.htm file

  1. In the Project Explorer, right-click your new layout folder, select Add, and then select HTML Page.
  2. In the Name text box, enter layout.htm and click OK.
  3. From the Toolbox, add the Layout Header Start, Layout Header End, Layout Footer Start, and Layout Footer End controls.
  4. Drag the PageNavbar control onto the page and place it between the Layout Header Start and Layout Header End controls.
  5. Right-click the PageNavbar control and select Properties.
  6. On the Appearance tab, select Banner and click OK.

Creating a Preview.htm File

Finally, you need to create a preview file that you view when you select the layout in the Apply Theme and Layout dialog box. A preview.htm for our sample layout might contain a graphic that looks like the following.

Layouts can be much more complex and they can include several navigation bars, script, or even DHTML. Visual InterDev contains 17 layouts that you can use as is or customize to suit your needs.

Customizing Layouts

You can use layouts to provide access to common components, such as script files, to your pages. For example, if you use the same script in multiple pages, you can move the script to a .js file and include the script in a layout. Each page will then be able to use the script and you will only need to update the script in one location.

By including components, such as script files, in a layout, the updated version of the component is always available to the page.

In this section we'll talk about:

Adding Files to Layouts

You can use layouts to provide pointers to commonly used files. Each page that uses the layout will then have access to the referenced item, such as script or a graphic. You will then be able to maintain the item in a single location while providing the item to multiple pages.

To include files in your layouts, you must add the file to the appropriate layout folder and then add a reference to the file in layout.htm. For example, if you want to include a company logo on each page, you can reference the graphic file from a layout.

Example: Including a script file

This example explains how to add a reference to a script file in layout.htm. The script file includes functions for the PageNavbar control.

To include a file in a layout

In the Project Explorer, select _Layouts and select the folder that you want to add the file to.

  1. Drag the file, such as script.js, into the layout folder.
  2. Right-click layout.htm and select Open.
  3. Add a reference to the file at the top of the page:
<Script SRC="#Layout#/script.js">
</Script>

This HTML tells the page that the script file is located in the _Layouts directory of your project. Each page that uses that particular layout will also be able to use the functions located in the script file. If you make changes to the script file, you do not have to reapply the layout to view the changes.

An example of this technique can be found in the following file:

_Layouts\MenuLayout\layout.htm

Layout Samples

You can use layouts to position navigation bars and content on a page, as well as to reference other files. Visual InterDev provides great flexibility in the number of ways you can customize layouts.

This section contains samples showing a few of the different ways you can customize layouts. See how to:

Modifying the <BODY> Tag

In Visual InterDev, layout information is inserted into a file after the <BODY> tag. One side effect of including the layout after the <BODY> tag is that the <BODY> tag does not get automatically modified by the layout. To modify attributes of the <BODY> tag, you need to do a bit of extra work. There are several ways to do this:

  • Create an inline style within the layout header that modifies the <BODY> tag.
  • Reference a style sheet that modifies the <BODY> tag within the layout header.
  • Apply a theme that handles the <BODY> tag.
  • Adjust your default page template to suit your needs.

The sample below uses an inline style to modify the <BODY> tag.

Behind the Scenes

This downloadable sample contains the following files:

  • MenuStyle.css contains the inline style information.
  • Layout.htm contains a reference to MenuStyle.css.

Example: Inline style

Add the following style information to MenuStyles.css to modify the <BODY> tag.:

<style>
body {
margin-left: 0px;
margin-top: 0px;
}
</style> 

Add a reference to MenuStyles.css in layout.htm.

<link href="#LAYOUT#/MenuStyle.css" rel=stylesheet type=text/css>

Expanding Table Cells

This sample creates a navigation bar that includes a cell that expands and contracts its size based on the size of the browser window. This sample displays the text contained in the right table cell flush against the right margin of the browser.

Behind the Scenes

This downloadable sample uses the following file:

  • ExpandingTable.htm contains the expanding navigation bar.

ExpandingTable.htm

ExpandingTable.htm contains the following custom style information above the PageNavbar control in the page:

<STYLE>
.top { 
font-family: arial;
 font-weight: bold;
 text-decoration: none;
 width: 75px;
 font-size: 10pt;
 color: #20b2aa;
 text-align: center;
 vertical-align: middle;
 }
.top A { 
font-family: arial;
 font-weight: bold;
 text-decoration: none;
 width: 75px;
 font-size: 10pt;
 color: #20b2aa;
 text-align: center;
 vertical-align: middle;
 } 
</STYLE> 

The PageNavbar control on ExpandingTable.htm contains the following code in the HTMLFragment property:

<TD><SPAN class=top><A href=#URL#">#Label#</A></SPAN>

The AlternatePage property for the PageNavbar control uses the following:

Samples/NavBars/SampleNavBars/Default.htm

An extra table cell is added above the PageNavbar control to create the expanding table effect:

<TABLE bgColor=#191970 width=100%><TR><TD> 

Creating Themes

Visual InterDev provides more than 50 themes for you to use in your Web pages. You also have the option of creating your own custom themes to meet the needs of your Web application. You can use the existing Visual InterDev themes, modify the existing themes, or create your own themes from scratch.

In this section we'll talk about:

What Is a theme?

In Visual InterDev, a theme is a collection of graphics, formatting, fonts, and colors that are managed with cascading style sheets. Themes save you time by providing a quick method of creating visually consistent Web pages.

You can apply a single theme to the entire Web application or you can apply different themes to individual pages. Visual InterDev comes with a set of 50 predesigned themes for you to use. You can also install third-party themes or create your own.

In general, a theme includes custom:

  • Fonts
  • Background images
  • Heading images
  • Rule images
  • Bullet images
  • Navigation bar images

Creating Your Own Theme

A theme consists of several .css and graphics files contained in a single folder within the _Themes directory. Some themes files are required while others, such as graphics, are optional. To create a custom theme, you can edit an existing theme's files or add additional files to a theme.

Each theme folder must contain the following files.

File name Description
color0.css Specifies the color of links, headings, and the page background color.
graph0.css Controls text navigation bars.
theme.css Controls the background image, font family, and font size.
custom.css Controls graphical navigation bar links and unordered list bullets.
name.inf Lists the theme name and version information.
Note   You must use the .css file names listed in the preceding table for themes to work properly in Visual InterDev.

Optional files:

  • Graphics such as .gif and .jpeg files
  • Any other associated files

The name used for the theme's folder and the .inf file must be the name of the theme. You specify the theme name within the .inf file.

To create a new theme

  1. Create a new folder within the _Themes directory.
Note   If you have not applied a theme to the Web project or to a page, the _Themes folder does not appear in the Project Explorer. We recommend that you apply a theme to a page to create the _Themes folder.
  1. Add four cascading style sheet files and name them color0.css, graph0.css, theme.css, and custom.css.
  2. Create an .inf file and give it the same name as the theme folder name.
  3. Add the following to the .inf file:
    [info]
    title=name
    codepage=1252
    version=number 
    readonly=true 
    refcount=1
    

For name, supply the name that will identify your theme in the Apply Theme and Layout dialog box. For number, supply a version number, such as 1.00, for the theme.

For more information about creating theme style sheets, see Appendix.

You can also modify existing Visual InterDev 6.0 theme files to customize the appearance of your pages. Third-party themes are also available for purchase. You can even add new graphics to existing themes to spice up your pages. For more information see the following section, "Customizing Themes."

Customizing Themes

Visual InterDev provides more than 50 different themes for you to use in your Web applications. You can also choose to create your own themes or modify existing themes to create the visual design for your site.

In this section we'll talk about:

Modifying an Existing Theme Class

You can modify existing Visual InterDev themes in a couple of ways. You can edit the theme .css files and you can add or remove graphics. To modify a theme .css file, you need to know which .css file contains the class you want to modify and which class contains the associated properties.

A theme consists of four .css files:

  • Color0.css
  • Custom.css
  • Graph0.css
  • Theme.css

In general, color0.css contains all the color classes; theme.css contains font family, font size, and background image classes; graph0.css contains the text navigation bar classes; and custom.css contains the graphical navigation bar classes.

Example 1: Modifying a theme's background image

In this example, we'll explain how to change the background image of the Expedition theme to a new file, newimage.jpg. The background image information for the theme is contained in the theme.css file in the Body class.

BODY
{
     BACKGROUND-IMAGE: url(exptextb.jpg);
     FONT-FAMILY: Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times
}

Note   You must have a file called newimage.jpg in the Expedition folder of the _Themes directory.

To change the background image

  1. In the Project Explorer, navigate to theme.css in _Themes\expeditn\.
  2. Right-click theme.css and select Open.
  3. In the CSS editor, select Body under HTML tags and then select the Background tab.
  4. In the Use background image text box, change exptextb.jpg to newimage.jpg.
  5. Save the file.

Theme.css will now use newimage.jpg for the page background:

BODY
{
     BACKGROUND-IMAGE: url(newimage.jpg);
     FONT-FAMILY: Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times
}

Example 2: Modifying a theme's banner navigation bar's font size

In this example, we'll modify the banner font size used by the PageNavbar control in the Expedition theme. The banner font information for the theme is contained in custom.css in the .mstheme-bannertxt-g class:

.mstheme-bannertxt-g
{
     font-family: Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times;
     font-size: 24pt;
     color: rgb(255,255,204);
     text-align: center;
     vertical-align: middle;
     background-image: url(expbannd.gif);
}

To change the banner text

  1. In the Project Explorer, navigate to custom.css in _Themes\expeditn\.
  2. Right-click custom.css and select Open.
  3. In the CSS editor, select .mstheme-bannertxt-g under Classes and then select the Font tab.
  4. In the Size area, change Specific from 24 to 16.
  5. Save the file.

The banner text will now use the new font size:

.mstheme-bannertxt-g
{
font-family: Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times;
font-size: 16pt;
color: rgb(255,255,204);
text-align: center;
vertical-align: middle;
background-image: url(expbannd.gif);
}

Versioning Themes

Visual InterDev uses theme version numbers to decide which theme files to keep if conflicts or changes are detected by the Apply Themes and Layouts dialog box. The name.inf file for each theme contains the version number. If you modify existing themes, you must increase the version number in the name.inf file so the Apply Theme and Layout dialog box does not discard your changes and use the original theme files.

When you create new themes from scratch, it is also good to include a version number. If you include a version number you can track the changes you make to the theme and assure that you are using the most current theme. You must also make sure that your new theme name is unique and doesn't conflict with an existing theme name.

To view the theme version number

  1. In Project Explorer, select _Themes and then select the appropriate theme folder.
  2. In the theme folder, right-click name.inf and select Open.
  3. View the number listed after version=.

For more information about the name.inf file, see the earlier section "Modifying an Existing Theme Class."

Appendix A: Visual InterDev Theme Style Sheet Templates

This appendix contains the cascading style sheet template information for Visual InterDev themes:

Color0.css

a:link 
{
}
a:visited 
{
}
a:active 
{
}
body 
{
}
table 
{
}
h1 
{
}
h2 
{
}
h3 
{
}
h4 
{
}
h5 
{
}
h6 
{
}

Custom.css

.mstheme-bannertxt A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-g 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-s 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome-g 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup-g 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font-g 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:visited 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs A:active 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs A:link 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs A:visited 
{
}
UL 
{
}
UL UL 
{
}
UL UL UL 
{
}

Graph0.css

mstheme 
{
     separator-image: url(hr.gif);
     list-image-1: url(li1.gif);
     list-image-2: url(li2.gif);
     list-image-3: url(li3.gif);
     nav-banner-image: url(banner.gif);
     navbutton-horiz-normal: url(horiz.gif);
     navbutton-horiz-pushed: url(horizs.gif);
     navbutton-vert-normal: url(vert.gif);
     navbutton-vert-pushed: url(verts.gif);
     navbutton-home-normal: url(home.gif);
     navbutton-next-normal: url(next.gif);
     navbutton-prev-normal: url(back.gif);
     navbutton-up-normal: url(up.gif);
}
.mstheme-bannertxt 
{
}
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt 
{
}
.mstheme-vert-navtxt 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxthome 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtnext 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtprev 
{
}
.mstheme-navtxtup 
{
}

Theme.css

.mstheme 
{
     top-bar-button: url(top.gif);
     version: 1.0;
     navbutton-background-color: rgb(255,255,255);
}
.mstheme-topbar-font 
{
}
body 
{
}
h1 
{
}
h2 
{
}
h3 
{
}
h4 
{
}
h5 
{
}
h6 
{
}

Appendix B: Theme Classes and Class Locations

This appendix contains the theme classes and class locations for Visual InterDev navigation bars.

Class Description File
Body – Graphical Background Image for Theme Theme.css
Body – Color Background Color for Theme Color0.css
H1 – H6 (Font) Font values for Headers Theme.css
H1 – H6 (Color) Color values for Headers Color0.css
a:link Color values for Links Color0.css
a:visited Color values for Visited Links Color0.css
a:active Color values for Active Links Color0.css
UL (Images) Images for UL bullets Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt Text Banner Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-bannertxt A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
mstheme-horiz-navtxt Horizontal Text Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt Vertical Text Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome Home Link in Text Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext Next Link in Text Arrow Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev Previous Link in Text Arrow Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup Up Link in Text Navigation Bar Graph0.css
.mstheme-navtxtup A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-g Graphical Banner Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-s Text Banner Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-bannertxt-s A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g Horizontal Graphical Navigation Bar Item Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs Horizontal Graphical Selected Navigation Bar Item Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-horiz-navtxt-gs A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g Vertical Graphical Navigation Bar Item Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs Vertical Graphical Selected Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtx A:Visited t-gs Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-vert-navtxt-gs A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome-g Home Link in Graphical Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxthome-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g Next Link in Graphical Arrow Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtnext-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g Previous Link in Graphical Arrow Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtprev-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup-g Up Link in Graphical Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-navtxtup-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-topbar-font Text Global Navigation Bar Theme.css
.mstheme-topbar-font A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Theme.css
.mstheme-topbar-font A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Theme.css
.mstheme-topbar-font A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Theme.css
.mstheme-topbar-font-g Graphical Global Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:Link Color Values for A:Links within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:Visited Color Values for A:Visited within Navigation Bar Custom.css
.mstheme-topbar-font-g A:Active Color Values for A:Active within Navigation Bar Custom.css
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