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Using Universal Names and Syntax to Localize your Visio Solutions

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Microsoft Corporation

February 2002

Applies to:
   Microsoft Visio Standard 2002
   Microsoft Visio Professional 2002
   Microsoft Visio Standard 2000
   Microsoft Visio Professional 2000
   Microsoft Visio Technical 2000
   Microsoft Visio Enterprise 2000

Summary: This article describes how to use universal names and syntax in your code, making custom Microsoft Visio solutions easy to localize. It also discusses how to access stencils, templates, and add-ons across locales. (21 printed pages)

Introduction
Local and Universal Names
   Using universal names of objects included with Microsoft Visio
   Using universal names of objects you create
   Getting and setting universal names of objects through code
   Accessing cells in the ShapeSheet spreadsheet
   Accessing add-ons
   Accessing templates and stencils
Universal Syntax
   Getting and setting formulas using universal syntax
   Cross-referencing cells in formulas using universal cell names
   Using universal separators
   Using universal units
   Using universal date, time, and currency formatting
   Using universal functions
Additional Information

Introduction

Microsoft® Visio® 2002 is available in multiple languages for international markets. When developing custom solutions for Microsoft Visio, determine whether you want to adapt or localize your solutions to work with multiple languages. Localization techniques, such as using universal Visio object names and universal syntax, save time and money.

Note   This article doesn't cover general localization issues, such as designing a localizable user interface. For more information, visit the Microsoft Global Software Development Web site.

Local and Universal Names

For the various language versions of Microsoft Visio, the language displayed in the user interface changes. Names of objects in the user interface, such as masters, master shortcuts, pages, styles, layers, ShapeSheet® rows, and ShapeSheet cells, change with each language version. Referencing these object names in your code makes solutions time-consuming to localize: each name reference must be changed for every language version that the solution supports.

Microsoft Visio Shape, Master, MasterShortcut, Page, Style, Layer, Row, and Cell objects have local and universal names so it's not necessary to reference user interface names in your solution code. Local names are the names in the user interface and change with each language version of Microsoft Visio. Universal names remain constant. They do not change with different language versions of Microsoft Visio, and can't be changed through the user interface. Refer to Visio Shape, Master, MasterShortcut, Page, Style, Layer, Row, and Cell objects by their universal names in your solution code to avoid changing the code for each supported language.

Using universal names of objects included with Microsoft Visio

The universal names of all masters, master shortcuts, styles, and layers included with Microsoft Visio are their English names. In the English version of Microsoft Visio, the universal and local names of these objects are the same—unless you change the universal name through your solution code or the local name through the user interface.

The universal names of all the ShapeSheet sections, rows, and cells for these objects are also the English names. In the English version of Microsoft Visio, the universal and local names of these objects are the same, with one exception: if you change the name of a row in one of the User-defined Cells, Custom Properties, Hyperlinks, or Connection Points sections (the only sections that have row names you can change), the local and universal names are no longer the same.

Note   If a ShapeSheet cell's local and universal name are different because you used the ShapeSheet user interface to change the name of the row that contains that cell, and then you use the CellExists property to determine whether the cell exists, Microsoft Visio determines the cell exists if it finds either the local or universal name.

When you use a language version of Microsoft Visio other than English, the ShapeSheet spreadsheet's user interface translation is inconsistent across language versions; it usually displays a combination of local names in the user's language and universal names in English. Sometimes the local name may be the same as the universal name and other times it may not; it depends on the mixture of languages in the user interface.

Using universal names of objects you create

When you create a new Shape, Master, MasterShortcut, Page, Style, Layer, Row, or Cell object, either through the user interface or your solution code, and name it for the first time, the local and universal names are the same. After that, if you change the name through the user interface or if you use a different language version of Microsoft Visio, only the local name changes. For example, if you insert a row in the User-defined Cells section in the ShapeSheet spreadsheet, and then name the row User.ABC, that name is the row's universal and local name. If you change the row name to User.ABCDE, the row's universal name is still User.ABC; however, the row's local name is User.ABCDE.

Getting and setting universal names of objects through code

Through the Automation interface, you can get a Shape, Master, MasterShortcut, Page, Style, Layer, Row, or Cell object by its universal name, or set its universal name, using Microsoft Visio properties or methods that have a "U" suffix. These properties and methods are shown in the following table.

For example, if you want to verify the universal name of the current Layer object, you could use the NameU property to get the current Layer object's universal name, as shown in the following example.

Debug.Print "The current layerObj name is """ & layerObj.NameU & "."""

Table 1. Properties and methods that reference objects by their universal name

Property or methodObjectsDescription
CellExistsU propertyShape and StyleDetermines whether a cell exists using its universal name.

Note   If you change the name of a cell through the ShapeSheet user interface, you are changing the local name.

CellsRowIndexU propertyShapeGets a cell's row index using the cell's universal name.
CellsU propertyShape and StyleGets a cell using its universal name.
CellU propertyRowGets a cell using its universal name.
ItemU propertyLayers, Masters, MasterShortcuts, Pages, Shapes, and StylesGets an object from a collection using its universal name.
Name property

Note   This is the only property you use to get a universal name that doesn't end with "U."

CellGets or sets the universal name of a cell.

Note   Use the LocalName property to get or set the local name of a cell. For more details on accessing cells, see the Accessing cells in the ShapeSheet spreadsheet section.

NameU propertyLayer, Master, MasterShortcut, Page, Row, Shape, and StyleGets or sets an object's universal name.
RowNameU propertyCellGets or sets a row's universal name.
DropManyU methodApplicationCreates one or more new Shape objects on a page, in a master, or in a group using universal names to identify the shapes, and it returns an array of the IDs for the Shape objects it creates.
GetNamesU methodMasterShortcuts, Shapes, Masters, and PagesGets the universal names of all items in a collection.

For more information on using these properties and methods and associated example code, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

Accessing cells in the ShapeSheet spreadsheet

When you develop solutions that support multiple languages, access cells using their universal names. The method you use to do this, however, depends on the type of section and row the cell is in.

Accessing cells in sections with named rows

If the cell you want to access is in a ShapeSheet section in which you can change the names of its rows, as shown in the following table, use the CellsU property to access the cell by its universal name.

The following example shows how you could reference the cell, User.visKeywords.Value, by its universal name.

Set cellObj = shpObj.CellsU("User.visKeywords.Value")

Table 2. Sections with named rows and their universal row prefix

SectionUniversal row prefixExample row name
Connection Points

Note   Not all Connection Point rows are named.

Connections.Connections.Top
Custom PropertiesProp.Prop.Cost
HyperlinksHyperlink.Hyperlink.HeadOffice
User-defined CellsUser.User.visVersion

For more information on these sections and rows, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

Accessing cells in sections with a known number of cells

If the cell you want to access is in any of the ShapeSheet sections that have a known, or constant, number of cells, as shown in the following table, use the CellsSRC property to access the cell by its section, row, and cell index. Accessing cells using the CellsSRC property is locale-independent because you use an index (represented by a constant declared in the Visio type library) rather than a name, and it's faster than other methods that use cell names.

For example, you could reference the Fill Pattern cell in the Fill Format section by its section, row, and cell index (represented by constants), as shown in the following example.

Set cellObj = shpObj.CellsSRC(visSectionObject, visRowFill, 
visFillPattern)

Note   The sections shown in the following table are found in Shape, Page, and Document objects.

Table 3. Sections with a known number of cells, section constant, and row constant

SectionSection constantRow constant
1-D EndpointsvisSectionObjectvisRowXForm1D
AlignmentvisSectionObjectvisRowAlign
Document PropertiesvisSectionObjectvisRowDoc
EventsvisSectionObjectvisRowEvent
Fill FormatvisSectionObjectvisRowFill
Glue InfovisSectionObjectvisRowMisc
Group PropertiesvisSectionObjectvisRowGroup
Image PropertiesvisSectionObjectvisRowImage
Layer MembershipvisSectionObjectvisRowLayerMem
Line FormatvisSectionObjectvisRowLine
MiscellaneousvisSectionObjectvisRowMisc
Page LayoutvisSectionObjectvisRowPageLayout
Page PropertiesvisSectionObjectvisRowPage
ProtectionvisSectionObjectvisRowLock
Ruler and GridvisSectionObjectvisRowRulerGrid
Shape LayoutvisSectionObjectvisRowShapeLayout
Shape TransformvisSectionObjectvisRowXFormOut
Text Block FormatvisSectionObjectvisRowText

For more information on these sections and rows, and on the cells in these sections and rows, and their constants, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference). More information on these topics is also in Developing Microsoft Visio Solutions, Appendix B on MSDN®, the Microsoft Developer Network.

Accessing cells in sections with an unknown number of cells

If the cell you want to access isn't in any of the previously mentioned ShapeSheet sections, the section it's in has an unknown, or variable, number of cells, such as the Geometry section.

To access cells in sections with an unknown number of cells

  1. Use the RowCount property to get the number of rows in the section.
  2. Iterate through the rows.
  3. Get the cells associated with a row using the CellsSRC property.

For more information about using these properties and associated example code, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

Accessing add-ons

Microsoft Visio Addon objects don't have local and universal names. They have only one name that you can get, but not set, using the Name property. The method you use to work with this for different locales depends on how your add-on is called:

  • If your add-on is called from the Macros menu (or the Add-Ons menu if you're in developer mode), you must translate the name for every language version of Microsoft Visio you support.
  • If your add-on is called from a shape's ShapeSheet cell using the RUNADDONWARGS function, from a persisted document event, or using an object's AddonName property, you don't have to translate the name—the name of the add-on is essentially a universal name in this situation.
  • If your add-on is in a Visio library (VSL) file and is called in multiple ways, you can create two copies of your add-on (VSL files support multiple add-ons). One copy of the add-on has a name that is localized and added to a resource string in your VSL file; this add-on appears on the Macros menu (or the Add-Ons menu). The other copy is a "hidden" add-on that has a name you don't need to localize, which is the universal name. You call this add-on other ways, such as from a shape's ShapeSheet cell using the RUNADDONWARGS function, from a persisted document event, or using an object's AddonName property. This add-on never appears on the Macros menu (or the Add-Ons menu).
    Note   To run Microsoft Visio in developer mode, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Advanced tab. Under Developer settings, select Run in developer mode.

Accessing templates and stencils

Microsoft Visio Document objects don't have local and universal names. They have only one name; however, you can use the AlternateNames property to simulate universal names.

When Microsoft Visio opens a document, such as a template or stencil, or accesses the Documents collection, and it can't find the document name in the template or stencil path or in the Documents collection, it looks for the alternate document names (that you set using the AlternateNames property) in the template and stencil path or in the Documents collection. And, as long as the AlternateNames property contains all possible names for your template or stencil, or at least contains the name you use to access the document through your code, Microsoft Visio should always find the document no matter what language you're using.

For example, the following names are the alternate names for the Basic Flowchart Shapes stencil that's included with Microsoft Visio.

Basic Flowchart Shapes.vss;Basic Flowchart Shapes (US Units).vss;<Begin 
   Localize>;Basic Flowcharts Shapes2.vss;Basic Flowchart Shapes With 
   Vertical Text.vss;Basic Flowchart Shapes.vss;Flowchart 
   Shapes2.vss;Flowchart Shapes.vss;FLOWCHRT.VSS;FLOWCHT2.VSS

You can use the following code to open the Basic Flowchart Shapes stencil (in the docked position and read-only mode) in any language version of Microsoft Visio because the name used in the following code is also included in the alternate names listed previously.

Documents.OpenEx("Basic Flowchart Shapes.vss", visOpenDocked+visOpenRO)

Note   To set or determine the template and stencil paths, on the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the File Paths tab. Or use the TemplatePaths and StencilPaths properties for the Application object to set template and stencil paths in your code. File paths are different for different language versions of Microsoft Visio.

For more information on the AlternateNames property and associated example code, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

Universal Syntax

The key to controlling shape actions is to write ShapeSheet formulas that define the behavior you want. Formulas are expressions that contain constants, functions, operators, and cell references. Microsoft Visio evaluates these formulas, and then converts the result to the appropriate units and syntax for the ShapeSheet cell that contains the formula. Different countries/regions often use different syntax—or formats—for dates, time, currency, units, and so on. For example, people in the United States use month, day, and year syntax for dates while many other countries/regions use day, month, and year syntax. And, most people in the world use the Gregorian calendar, but some countries/regions such as Japan, Korea, Thailand, and some Middle Eastern countries/regions use different calendar types.

Just as the Microsoft Visio user interface displays local names of objects in the user interface, the ShapeSheet user interface displays local syntax in ShapeSheet cells. And, just as the local names of objects change with different language versions of Microsoft Visio, the local syntax in ShapeSheet cells, such as separators, units, dates, and currency symbols, also changes. It's equally important to use universal syntax in your formulas in your solution code as it is to use universal names for objects in your solution code.

Getting and setting formulas using universal syntax

You can get or set formulas or cell results in your custom Microsoft Visio solutions using universal syntax with the properties and methods as shown in the following table. For example, set a Cell object's formula using the FormulaU property and the universal decimal syntax (.), as shown in the following example.

cellobj.FormulaU = "Width*1.75"

Table 4. Properties and methods used to get and set universal syntax in formulas

Property or methodObjectsDescription
FieldFormulaU propertyCharactersGets a field's formula using universal syntax.
FormulaForceU propertyCellSets a formula using universal syntax even if the formula is protected with a GUARD function.
FormulaU propertyCellGets or sets a formula using universal syntax.

Note   The decimal point is always ".". The delimiter is always ",". And, you must use universal units.

GetFormulasU methodMaster, Shape, Style, and PageGets the formulas for more than one cell using universal syntax.
SetFormulas methodMaster, Shape, Style, and PageSets the formulas for one or more cells. Use the visSetUniversalSyntax flag to use universal syntax.
SetResults methodMaster, Shape, Style, and PageSets the results (values) for one or more cells. Use the visSetUniversalSyntax flag to use universal syntax.

For more information on using these properties and methods and associated example code, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

Cross-referencing cells in formulas using universal cell names

In a cell's formula, you can refer to a cell of the same object or another object, such as a document or page, so that Microsoft Visio calculates a value for one cell based on another cell's value. When you develop custom Microsoft Visio solutions for multiple languages, make sure you use universal cell names when cross-referencing cells in formulas. For example, the universal name of the ShapeSheet spreadsheet for a page is the ThePage, and the universal name for the ShapeSheet spreadsheet for a document is TheDoc. You could use the example code, shown as follows, to reference the PageWidth cell for the page in a formula using the page's universal name.

cellobj.FormulaU = "ThePage!PageWidth*.25"

Using universal separators

Different countries/regions use different separators to separate lists, such as arguments, numbers, values, and so on, in formulas. For example, in the United States, a period (.) is the decimal separator; however, in most European countries/regions, the comma (,) is used as a decimal separator. To make sure you use a separator that works with any language version of Microsoft Visio, use the universal separators shown in the following table in your solution code.

For example, you could use the following example code to display 250.000 in a ShapeSheet cell in the English version of Microsoft Visio and 250,000 in the French version of Microsoft Visio.

cellobj.FormulaU = "FORMAT(250,"0.000")"

Table 5. Universal separator syntax and behavior

SeparatorUniversal syntaxBehavior
Argument separatorComma (,)Separates arguments in formulas.
Decimal separatorPeriod (.)Determines how many digits are displayed to the left and right of the decimal position, and displays the decimal character defined by the system's Regional Settings.
List separatorSemicolon (;)Separates items in lists in formulas.

Using universal units

In formulas you often specify units of measure for values, and the set of recognized units change with each language version of Microsoft Visio. If you want your solution to work with multiple languages, use the universal syntax, shown in the following table, for units of measure.

You can also use the unit constants, as shown in the following table, to format cell values using a Cell object's Result property or the Application object's FormatResult method.

Table 6. Universal unit syntax and constants

UnitUniversal syntaxConstant
CentimeterCMvisCentimeters (69)
CicerosCvisCiceros (54)
Ciceros and didotsCICERO/DIDOTvisCicerosAndDidots (52)
Date or timeDATEvisDate (40)
DegreesDEGvisDegrees (81)
Degrees, minutes, and seconds°

(Decimal value: 0176)

visDegreeMinSec (82)
DidotsDvisDidots (53)
Elapsed daysEDvisElapsedDay (44)
Elapsed hoursEHvisElapsedHour (45)
Elapsed minutesEMvisElapsedMin (46)
Elapsed secondsESvisElapsedSec (47)
Elapsed weeksEWvisElapsedWeek (43)
FeetFTvisFeet (66)
Feet and inchesFEET/INCHESvisFeetAndInches (67)
InchesINvisInches (65)
Inches in fractionsIN_FvisInchFrac (73)
KilometersKMvisKilometers (72)
MetersMvisMeters (71)
MilesMIvisMiles (68)
Miles in fractionsMI_FvisMileFrac (74)
MillimetersMMvisMillimeters (70)
Minutes'visMin (84)
Nautical milesNMvisNautMiles (76)
Percent%visPercent (33)
PicasPvisPicas (51)
Picas and pointsPICAPOINTSvisPicasAndPoints (49)
PointsPTvisPoints (50)
RadiansRADvisRadians (83)
Seconds"visSec (85)
YardsYDvisYards (75)

Using universal date, time, and currency formatting

Date formats, time formats, and currency symbols also vary for different countries/regions and change with each language version of Microsoft Visio. For example, some currency symbols precede the amount and others follow the amount. Use the universal syntax, shown in the following table, in your solution code to ensure your solution displays the correct date, time, and currency formatting in different language versions of Microsoft Visio.

For example, you could use the following example code to display the currency symbol defined by your system's Regional Settings in any language version of Microsoft Visio.

cellobj.FormulaU = "$250"

Table 7. Universal date, time, and currency syntax and behavior

DescriptionUniversal syntaxBehavior
Currency symbol format$Formats and displays the currency symbol defined by the system's Regional Settings.
Date format/Formats and separates the date components, and displays the date separator defined by the system's Regional Settings.
Time format:Formats and displays the time separator defined by the system's Regional Settings.
Universal label placeholderuuu or UUUInserts the universal, three-character currency abbreviations for all currencies after each subunit. For example, 99.00 USD for US dollars or 42.70 FRF for French francs. The uuu placeholder inserts lowercase labels, and the UUU placeholder inserts uppercase labels.

Using universal functions

Formulas can contain functions and functions also have universal names. Most universal function names are the same as the English names. The following table contains all the English and universal names of Microsoft Visio functions.

Note   The universal names that are different from the English names are designated by bolding.

Table 8. English and universal function names

English function nameUniversal function name
_ADD_ADD
_CAT_CAT
_DIV_DIVV
_EEQ_EEQ
_EGE_EGE
_EGT_EGT
_ELE_ELE
_ELLIPSE_ECC_ELLIPSE_ECC
_ELLIPSE_THETA_ELLIPSE_THETA
_ELT_ELT
_ENE_ENE
_FEQ_FEQ
_FGE_FGE
_FGT_FGT
_FLE_FLE
_FLT_FLT
_FNE_FNE
_GLUELOC_GLUELOC
_GLUELOCPCT_GLUELOCPCT
_GLUEPAR_GLUEPAR
_GLUEPARPCT_GLUEPARPCT
_MARKER_MARKER
_MODMOD
_MU_MU
_NYI_NYI
_PCT_PCT
_POLYARCPOLYARC
_SHAPEMAX_SHAPEMAX
_SHAPEMIN_SHAPEMIN
_SUB_SUB
_UCON_BEGTYP_UCON_BEGTYP
_UCON_C1_UCON_C1
_UCON_C2_UCON_C2
_UCON_C3_UCON_C3
_UCON_D1_UCON_D1
_UCON_D2_UCON_D2
_UCON_D3_UCON_D3
_UCON_ENDTYP_UCON_ENDTYP
_UCON_GEOTYP_UCON_GEOTYP
_UCON_SIMPLE_UCON_SIMPLE
_UCON_X1_UCON_X1
_UCON_X2_UCON_X2
_UCON_X3_UCON_X3
_UCON_Y1_UCON_Y1
_UCON_Y2_UCON_Y2
_UCON_Y3_UCON_Y3
_UMARKER_UMARKER
_UMINUS_UMINUS
_UPLUS_UPLUS
_WALKGLUE_WALKGLUE
_XFTRIGGER_XFTRIGGER
ABSABS
ACOSACOS
ANDAND
ANG360ANG360
ANGLETOLOCANGLETOLOC
ANGLETOPARANGLETOPAR
ASINASIN
ATANATAN
ATAN2ATAN2
BITANDBITAND
BITNOTBITNOT
BITORBITOR
BITXORBITXOR
BKGPAGENAMEBKGPAGENAME
BLUEBLUE
CALLTHISCALLTHIS
CATEGORYCATEGORY
CEILINGCEILING
CHARCHAR
COMPANYCOMPANY
COSCOS
COSHCOSH
CREATORCREATOR
CYCY
DATA1DATA1
DATA2DATA2
DATA3DATA3
DATEDATE
DATETIMEDATETIME
DATEVALUEDATEVALUE
DAYDAY
DAYOFYEARDAYOFYEAR
DECIMALSEPDECIMALSEP
DEFAULTEVENT_DEFAULTEVENT
DEGDEG
DEPENDSONDEPENDSON
DESCRIPTIONDESCRIPTION
DIRECTORYDIRECTORY
DOCCREATIONDOCCREATION
DOCLASTEDITDOCLASTEDIT
DOCLASTPRINTDOCLASTPRINT
DOCLASTSAVEDOCLASTSAVE
DOCMDDOCMD
DOOLEVERB_DOOLEVERB
EVALTEXT_EVALTEXT
FIELDPICTUREFIELDPICTURE
FILENAMEFILENAME
FLOORFLOOR
FORMATFORMAT
FORMATEXFORMATEX
FORMULAEXISTSFORMULAEXISTS
GOTOPAGE_GOTOPAGE
GRAVITYGRAVITY
GREENGREEN
GUARDGUARD
HELP_HELP
HOURHOUR
HSHS
HUEHUE
HYPERLINKHYPERLINK
HYPERLINKBASEHYPERLINKBASE
IDID
IFIF
INDEXINDEX
INTINT
INTERSECTXINTERSECTX
INTERSECTYINTERSECTY
INTUPINTUP
ISERRISERR
ISERRNAISERRNA
ISERRORISERROR
ISERRVALUEISERRVALUE
KEYWORDSKEYWORDS
LISTSEPLISTSEP
LNLN
LOCLOC
LOCALFORMULAEXISTSLOCALFORMULAEXISTS
LOCTOLCOLOCTOLCO
LOCTOPARLOCTOPAR
LOG10LOG10
LOOKUPLOOKUP
LOTUSNOTESLOTUSNOTES
LOWERLOWER
LUMLUM
MAGNITUDEMAGNITUDE
MANAGERMANAGER
MASTERNAMEMASTERNAME
MAXMAX
MINMIN
MINUTEMINUTE
MODULUSMODULUS
MONTHMONTH
NANA
NAMENAME
NOTNOT
NOWNOW
NURBSNURBS
OPENFILEOPENFILE
OPENGROUPWIN_OPENGROUPWIN
OPENPAGE_OPENPAGE
OPENSHEETWIN_OPENSHEETWIN
OPENTEXTWIN_OPENTEXTWIN
OROR
PAGECOUNTPAGECOUNT
PAGENAMEPAGENAME
PAGENUMBERPAGENUMBER
PARPAR
PIPI
PLAYSOUNDPLAYSOUND
PNTPNT
PNTXPNTX
PNTYPNTY
POLYLINEPOLYLINE
POWPOW
RADRAD
RANDRAND
RECTSECTRECTSECT
REDRED
REFREF
RGBRGB
ROUNDROUND
RUNADDON_RUNADDON
RUNADDONWARGS_RUNADDONWARGS
RUNMACRORUNMACRO
SATSAT
SECONDSECOND
SETFSETF
SHAPETEXTSHAPETEXT
SIGNSIGN
SINSIN
SINHSINH
SQRTSQRT
STRSAMESTRSAME
STRSAMEEXSTRSAMEEX
SUBJECTSUBJECT
SUMSUM
TANTAN
TANHTANH
TEXTHEIGHTTEXTHEIGHT
TEXTWIDTHTEXTWIDTH
TIMETIME
TIMEVALUETIMEVALUE
TITLETITLE
TRUNCTRUNC
TYPETYPE
TYPEDESCTYPEDESC
UPPERUPPER
USEUSE
USERUIUSERUI
WEEKDAYWEEKDAY
YEARYEAR

Additional Information

Microsoft Visio 2002 is available in the following languages:

  • English
  • Japanese
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Italian
  • Korean
  • Traditional Chinese
  • Simplified Chinese
  • Dutch
  • Brazilian Portuguese
  • Danish
  • Swedish
  • Norwegian
  • Finnish
Note   Norwegian and Finnish are available only in Microsoft Visio 2002 SR-1. For more information on the different language versions of Microsoft Visio, visit the Microsoft Visio Web site.

For more information on any of the objects, properties, and methods in this article, search the Developer Reference in Microsoft Visio (on the Help menu, click Developer Reference).

For more information about creating Microsoft Visio solutions, see Developing Microsoft Visio Solutions on MSDN, the Microsoft Developer Network.

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