How to: Create a Repository [AX 2012]

Updated: August 11, 2011

Applies To: Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 R2, Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 Feature Pack, Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012

A repository folder stores copies of all Microsoft Dynamics AX development objects when you use a version control system (VCS) that supports isolated development. Examples of such version control systems are Team Foundation Server (TFS) and Microsoft Visual SourceSafe (VSS).

The computers of administrators and developers each have a folder in the local file system that acts as a repository folder. For a developer computer, the repository folder receives a local copy to edit when you check out items.

We recommend that you do not share the same repository between the Microsoft Dynamics AX client and the version control client. You can install Team Explorer or the VSS client on developer computers. If one of these clients that runs against the version control server shares a repository folder with a Microsoft Dynamics AX client, a conflict may occur. If a change is checked in by using the Team Explorer instance or the VSS client, the Microsoft Dynamics AX client will not reflect those changes when you synchronize the Microsoft Dynamics AX client unless you select Force when you synchronize.

One example of a repository structure for TFS version control is as follows:

$/<ProjectName>/Branches/Main/PrimaryAXApplication/ModelA/Classes

The following table describes the elements in the example repository structure.

Element

Description

<ProjectName>

The project root. Specify this value in the Version control parameters form.

Branches/Main

A branch folder. Specify this value in the Version control parameters form.

Branching is optional, but recommended. You can use branching if you use TFS for version control. You should have a main branch and additional branches for development or incremental releases. For more information about branching, see How to: Configure Branching for Version Control

Each branch can have an application folder for Microsoft Dynamics AX. Each branch can have another folder for elements that are not in Microsoft Dynamics AX. For example, you could have a folder for C++ library elements from Visual Studio that you want to add to version control.

PrimaryAXApplication

The application folder; optional. Specify this value in the Version control parameters form.

The application folder contains a definition file and models. A definition file defines global settings for version control users and the list of models that are under version control.

ModelA

The model folder. Specify this value in the System settings form.

A model folder contains application objects, label files, and the model manifest XML file.

NoteNote

Use a single level for your model folder. For example, use ModelA instead of Models\ModelA. Otherwise, you might get an error when you use the Pending objects form.

Classes

The AOT path.

The actual repository folder could be similar to the following:

C:\AX_dev\Root\PrimaryAXApplication\ModelA\Classes

This example uses branching. You can use branching if you use TFS for version control. For more information about branching, see How to: Configure Branching for Version Control.

NoteNote

Notice that the branch is not included in the repository folder structure in the client. The workspace mapping determines the substructure that the Microsoft Dynamics AX client connects to. This example does not show the use of additional subfolders. You can use additional subfolders, but additional subfolders have been deprecated. You cannot use additional subfolders and models at the same time.

Element

Description

C:\AX_dev\Root

The repository folder. Specify this value in the Version control parameters form.

PrimaryAXApplication

The application folder. The application folder is optional unless you add elements to version control that are not in Microsoft Dynamics AX.

ModelA

The model folder.

Classes

The AOT path.

To create a repository folder

  1. Open Windows Explorer.

  2. Create a new folder to use as the local repository folder. A minimal example of the folder structure for a main branch that contains one model called ModelA is C:\MyEnlistments\Main\ModelA.

NoteNote

The structure of your repository depends on your development process and the VCS you use. For example, if you use TFS for version control, you can use branching. If you use VSS for version control, you can use additional subfolders. If you use MorphX VCS, your repository structure might be simpler.

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