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How to: Programmatically Insert Text into Word Documents

There are three primary ways to insert text into Microsoft Office Word documents:

  • Insert text in a range.

  • Replace text in a range with new text.

  • Use the TypeText method of a Selection object to insert text at the cursor or selection.

Note Note

You can also insert text into content controls and bookmarks. For more information, see Content Controls and Bookmark Control.

Applies to: The information in this topic applies to document-level projects and application-level projects for Word 2013 and Word 2010. For more information, see Features Available by Office Application and Project Type.

Use the Text property of a Range object to insert text in a document.

To insert text in a range

  1. Specify a range at the beginning of a document and insert the text New Text.

    The following code example can be used in a document-level customization.

    object start = 0; 
    object end = 0; 
    
    Word.Range rng = this.Range(ref start, ref end); 
    rng.Text = "New Text"; 
    

    The following code example can be used in an application-level add-in. This code uses the active document.

    Word.Range rng = this.Application.ActiveDocument.Range(0, 0);
    rng.Text = "New Text";
    
  2. Select the Range object, which has expanded from one character to the length of the inserted text.

    rng.Select();
    

If the specified range contains text, all text in the range is replaced with the inserted text.

To replace text in a range

  1. Create a Range object that consists of the first 12 characters in the document.

    The following code example can be used in a document-level customization.

    object start = 0; 
    object end = 12; 
    
    Word.Range rng = this.Range(ref start, ref end); 
    

    The following code example can be used in an application-level add-in. This code uses the active document.

    Word.Range rng = this.Application.ActiveDocument.Range(0, 12);
    
  2. Replace those characters with the string New Text.

    rng.Text = "New Text"; 
    
  3. Select the range.

    rng.Select();
    

The TypeText method inserts text at the selection. TypeText behaves differently depending on the options set on the user's computer. The code in the following procedure declares a Selection object variable, and turns off the Overtype option if it is turned on. If the Overtype option is activated, then any text next to the cursor is overwritten.

To insert text using the TypeText method

  1. Declare a Selection object variable.

    Word.Selection currentSelection = Application.Selection; 
    
  2. Turn off the Overtype option if it is turned on.

    if (Application.Options.Overtype) 
    { 
        Application.Options.Overtype = false; 
    } 
    
  3. Test to see whether the current selection is an insertion point.

    If it is, the code inserts a sentence using TypeText, and then a paragraph mark using the TypeParagraph method.

    // Test to see if selection is an insertion point. 
    if (currentSelection.Type == Word.WdSelectionType.wdSelectionIP) 
    { 
        currentSelection.TypeText("Inserting at insertion point. ");
        currentSelection.TypeParagraph(); 
    } 
    
  4. The code in the ElseIf block tests to see whether the selection is a normal selection. If it is, then another If block tests to see whether the ReplaceSelection option is turned on. If it is, the code uses the Collapse method of the selection to collapse the selection to an insertion point at the start of the selected block of text. Insert the text and a paragraph mark.

    else  
        if (currentSelection.Type == Word.WdSelectionType.wdSelectionNormal)
        { 
            // Move to start of selection. 
            if (Application.Options.ReplaceSelection)
            { 
                object direction = Word.WdCollapseDirection.wdCollapseStart;
                currentSelection.Collapse(ref direction);
            }
            currentSelection.TypeText("Inserting before a text block. ");
            currentSelection.TypeParagraph();
        }
    
  5. If the selection is not an insertion point or a block of selected text, then the code in the Else block does nothing.

    else
    {
        // Do nothing.
    }
    

You can also use the TypeBackspace method of the Selection object, which mimics the functionality of the BACKSPACE key on your keyboard. However, when it comes to inserting and manipulating text, the Range object offers you more control.

The following example shows the complete code. To use this example, run the code from the ThisDocument or ThisAddIn class in your project.

private void SelectionInsertText() 
{ 
    Word.Selection currentSelection = Application.Selection; 

    // Store the user's current Overtype selection 
    bool userOvertype = Application.Options.Overtype;

    // Make sure Overtype is turned off. 
    if (Application.Options.Overtype) 
    { 
        Application.Options.Overtype = false; 
    } 

    // Test to see if selection is an insertion point. 
    if (currentSelection.Type == Word.WdSelectionType.wdSelectionIP) 
    { 
        currentSelection.TypeText("Inserting at insertion point. ");
        currentSelection.TypeParagraph(); 
    } 
    else  
        if (currentSelection.Type == Word.WdSelectionType.wdSelectionNormal)
        { 
            // Move to start of selection. 
            if (Application.Options.ReplaceSelection)
            { 
                object direction = Word.WdCollapseDirection.wdCollapseStart;
                currentSelection.Collapse(ref direction);
            }
            currentSelection.TypeText("Inserting before a text block. ");
            currentSelection.TypeParagraph();
        }
        else
        {
            // Do nothing.
        }

    // Restore the user's Overtype selection
    Application.Options.Overtype = userOvertype;
}
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