goto (C# Reference)

 

Updated: July 20, 2015

For the latest documentation on Visual Studio 2017 RC, see Visual Studio 2017 RC Documentation.

The goto statement transfers the program control directly to a labeled statement.

A common use of goto is to transfer control to a specific switch-case label or the default label in a switch statement.

The goto statement is also useful to get out of deeply nested loops.

The following example demonstrates using goto in a switch statement.

    class SwitchTest
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Coffee sizes: 1=Small 2=Medium 3=Large");
            Console.Write("Please enter your selection: ");
            string s = Console.ReadLine();
            int n = int.Parse(s);
            int cost = 0;
            switch (n)
            {
                case 1:
                    cost += 25;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    cost += 25;
                    goto case 1;
                case 3:
                    cost += 50;
                    goto case 1;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid selection.");
                    break;
            }
            if (cost != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Please insert {0} cents.", cost);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Thank you for your business.");

            // Keep the console open in debug mode.
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
    /*
    Sample Input:  2
     
    Sample Output:
    Coffee sizes: 1=Small 2=Medium 3=Large
    Please enter your selection: 2
    Please insert 50 cents.
    Thank you for your business.
    */

The following example demonstrates using goto to break out from nested loops.

    public class GotoTest1
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            int x = 200, y = 4;
            int count = 0;
            string[,] array = new string[x, y];

            // Initialize the array:
            for (int i = 0; i < x; i++)

                for (int j = 0; j < y; j++)
                    array[i, j] = (++count).ToString();

            // Read input:
            Console.Write("Enter the number to search for: ");

            // Input a string:
            string myNumber = Console.ReadLine();

            // Search:
            for (int i = 0; i < x; i++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < y; j++)
                {
                    if (array[i, j].Equals(myNumber))
                    {
                        goto Found;
                    }
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine("The number {0} was not found.", myNumber);
            goto Finish;

        Found:
            Console.WriteLine("The number {0} is found.", myNumber);

        Finish:
            Console.WriteLine("End of search.");


            // Keep the console open in debug mode.
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
    /*
    Sample Input: 44
     
    Sample Output
    Enter the number to search for: 44
    The number 44 is found.
    End of search.
    */

For more information, see the C# Language Specification. The language specification is the definitive source for C# syntax and usage.

C# Reference
C# Programming Guide
C# Keywords
goto Statement
Jump Statements

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