TreeWalker.ControlViewWalker Field

 

Represents a predefined TreeWalker containing a view of elements in the tree that are marked as controls.

Namespace:   System.Windows.Automation
Assembly:  UIAutomationClient (in UIAutomationClient.dll)

public static readonly TreeWalker ControlViewWalker

If your client application might try to find elements in its own user interface, you must make all UI Automation calls on a separate thread.

The following example shows ControlViewWalker being used to construct a tree view of elements in a subtree.

/// <summary>
/// Walks the UI Automation tree and adds the control type of each element it finds 
/// in the control view to a TreeView.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="rootElement">The root of the search on this iteration.</param>
/// <param name="treeNode">The node in the TreeView for this iteration.</param>
/// <remarks>
/// This is a recursive function that maps out the structure of the subtree beginning at the
/// UI Automation element passed in as rootElement on the first call. This could be, for example,
/// an application window.
/// CAUTION: Do not pass in AutomationElement.RootElement. Attempting to map out the entire subtree of
/// the desktop could take a very long time and even lead to a stack overflow.
/// </remarks>
private void WalkControlElements(AutomationElement rootElement, TreeNode treeNode)
{
    // Conditions for the basic views of the subtree (content, control, and raw) 
    // are available as fields of TreeWalker, and one of these is used in the 
    // following code.
    AutomationElement elementNode = TreeWalker.ControlViewWalker.GetFirstChild(rootElement);

    while (elementNode != null)
    {
        TreeNode childTreeNode = treeNode.Nodes.Add(elementNode.Current.ControlType.LocalizedControlType);
        WalkControlElements(elementNode, childTreeNode);
        elementNode = TreeWalker.ControlViewWalker.GetNextSibling(elementNode);
    }
}

.NET Framework
Available since 3.0
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