Microsoft Windows XP Embedded Frequently Asked Questions

Microsoft Windows XP Embedded Frequently Asked Questions

 

Microsoft Corporation

August 2001

Applies to:
    Microsoft® Windows XP® Embedded

Summary: This document provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding Microsoft Windows XP Embedded. (5 printed pages)

Contents

What is new in Microsoft Windows XP Embedded that was not in Windows NT Embedded 4.0?
What is new with the tools in Windows XP Embedded that was not in Windows NT Embedded 4.0?
What type of processors does Windows XP Embedded support?
Can I convert my Windows NT Embedded 4.0 configurations to Windows XP Embedded configurations?
Can I convert the .kdf files that I created using Windows NT Embedded 4.0 into .sld files in Windows XP Embedded?
Is it easier to create components in Windows XP Embedded than it was in Windows NT Embedded?
How can I port an application written for Windows NT Embedded 4.0 to Windows XP Embedded?
Are the Windows XP Embedded features fully compatible with Windows XP?
Does Windows XP Embedded have the same features as Windows XP?
Is Windows XP Embedded a real-time OS?
Will Windows NT Embedded 4.0 continue to be supported?
Can I build server devices or appliances with Windows XP Embedded?
How does the licensing and pricing work for Windows XP Embedded?
How do I develop an application or driver for a Windows XP Embedded-based platform?
How do I add a component to my target OS?
Why are component object definitions important?

What is new in Microsoft® Windows® XP Embedded that was not in Windows NT® Embedded 4.0?

Windows XP Embedded incorporates all the advancements that have taken place on the Windows platform since the release of Windows NT Embedded 4.0. This includes all Windows 2000 technology as well as the latest Windows XP technology.

What is new with the tools in Windows XP Embedded that was not in Windows NT Embedded 4.0?

The Windows XP Embedded development tools, which are accessible through the Target Designer tool, have been completely redesigned based on customer feedback, usability testing, and technology advancements to provide a complete end-to-end development solution. For Windows XP Embedded, the database engine has been changed from Jet to Microsoft® SQL Server™. Windows XP Embedded also features some additional tools. Component Database Manager provides additional and improved functionality for database management. Target Analyzer facilitates the process of defining the hardware on your target device.

For an overview of the tools provided by Windows XP Embedded, see this Microsoft Web site.

What type of processors does Windows XP Embedded support?

Windows XP Embedded supports all X86-based Intel processors including Intel x86 and Pentium, AMD K5/K6, Cyrix 5x86, and 6x86 CPUs.

Can I convert my Windows NT Embedded 4.0 configurations to Windows XP Embedded configurations?

No, you cannot convert an entire Windows NT Embedded 4.0 configuration to a Windows XP configuration.

Can I convert the .kdf files that I created using Windows NT Embedded 4.0 into .sld files in Windows XP Embedded?

Yes, you can.

Is it easier to create components in Windows XP Embedded than it was in Windows NT Embedded?

Yes, Windows XP Embedded provides the ECONVERT tool, which is also capable of converting files and registry keys from .kdf format to .sld format.

How can I port an application written for Windows NT Embedded 4.0 to Windows XP Embedded?

Porting at the application level may involve a simple copy of the executable (.exe) file and its related files. At a more complex level, you may need to use Microsoft® Visual Studio® tools to rewrite portions of the source code to accommodate different core operating system (OS) issues, such as the difference in registry keys and settings. You will need to use Windows Embedded Component Designer to define the application in an .sld file so you can import it into the component database.

Are the Windows XP Embedded features fully compatible with Windows XP?

Yes, Windows XP Embedded contains the exact same binary files as Windows XP.

Does Windows XP Embedded have the same features as Windows XP?

Yes, Windows XP Embedded is a fully componentized version of Windows XP Professional. Windows XP Embedded enables you to utilize your choice of Windows XP features in your reduced-footprint embedded designs. In addition, Windows XP Embedded provides embedded features to enable a broad range of device implementations.

Is Windows XP Embedded a real-time OS?

Windows XP Embedded satisfies the vast majority of performance requirements. However, if you require a more powerful real-time support for your Windows XP Embedded OS, you can utilize one of the real-time extensions that are available through third-party vendors.

Will Windows NT Embedded 4.0 continue to be supported?

Yes, Windows NT Embedded 4.0 will continue to be supported.

Can I build server devices or appliances with Windows XP Embedded?

Windows XP Embedded is intended to build client devices only. Microsoft will release a server product in 2002 that will be targeted for building embedded server appliances and devices.

How does the licensing and pricing work for Windows XP Embedded?

For information on licensing and pricing, see this Microsoft Web site.

How do I develop an application or driver for a Windows XP Embedded-based platform?

You can use the same application environment that you use for developing applications for the desktop. You can develop your application on a Windows NT 4.0 retail system and not use your embedded system to develop the application. Microsoft Visual Studio offers a comprehensive environment for developing applications and drivers for Windows XP Embedded. Visit MSDN for information that provides the required documentation to develop applications and drivers for a Windows NT 4.0-based platform.

How do I add a component to my target OS?

Using Microsoft Component Designer, you can define a component in a manner that can be understood by the other Windows XP development tools. This component information is called a component object definition, and has an .sld extension.

Components define their own functionality and their own build script. In a component object definition, component functionality is expressed as resources, properties, and optional build script that define how the component uses the resources. You define dependencies and conflicts for each component. You can also manage groups of components as one by assigning components to a group and then managing the group.

Using Component Designer, you save the component object definition in a carrier file, which is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file that has an .sld extension. You can then import the component object definition into the component database.

Why are component object definitions important?

Component object definitions enable you to add any application, device, or service that works on your platform to the component database. Using the Windows Embedded development tools, you can then add the application, device, or service to your run-time image.

Component object definitions also ensure that the resources and dependencies for a component are selected appropriately. For example, pretend that you define two custom applications and import them into the component database. You create a standard configuration that contains neither of your applications. Next, you decide to create a run-time image using the standard configuration and one of the applications. When you add the application to the configuration, not only is the functionality of the application added, but the development tools are also alerted to the dependencies and build script for the application. This enables you to ensure that your configuration has all the components that are required for a successful build.

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