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Device.Display Requirements

Updated: September 4, 2013

Device.Display.Monitor

 

Related Requirements

Device.Display.Monitor.Base

Device.Display.Monitor.DigitalLinkProtection

Device.Display.Monitor.EDID

Device.Display.Monitor.Modes

Device.Display.Monitor.Stereoscopic3DModes

Device.Display.Monitor.Base

Base requirements for displays to ensure good end user experience

 

Target Feature

Device.Display.Monitor

Applies to

Windows 7 Client x86, x64

Windows 8 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT)

Windows 8.1 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT 8.1)

Windows Server 2012 R2 x64

Windows Server 2008 Release 2 x64

Windows Server 2012 x64

Description

All connectors on the monitor must be set to a mode which will not apply CE style overscan or underscan by default. It is ok for the monitor to provide an option to allow the user to configure overscan/underscan using a On screen display. All video displays that provide a HDMI connector, must support the ITC flag as defined in the HDMI specification.All digital displays are required to have a single HPD signal transition from low to high on device connection and power up. Periodic toggling of HPD signal after connection or power up is not allowed.  Multiple transition lead source to notify the OS of multiple device arrival  and removal event; causing undesirable mode set flashing. 

Additional Information

 

Business Justification

When users connect a PC to a display, sometimes the start menu or a portion of the desktop might not be visible or the desktop looks shrunk with black borders around it. Therefore the display must not perform overscan/underscan unless the user specifically requests it.    If the ITC flag (as defined in the HDMI specification) is set over HDMI, then the display knows that it is connected to a PC and must not apply overscan/underscan compensation.  Hence displays that provide a HDMI connector must support the ITC flag to ensure the entire image fits on the screen.  Displays must not do scaling since it impacts the readability of text.

Enforcement Date

Jun. 26, 2013

Device.Display.Monitor.DigitalLinkProtection

Display monitors that support digital inputs must support digital link protection on all digital inputs

 

Target Feature

Device.Display.Monitor

Applies to

Windows 7 Client x86, x64

Windows 8 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT)

Windows 8.1 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT 8.1)

Windows Server 2012 R2 x64

Windows Server 2008 Release 2 x64

Windows Server 2012 x64

Description

Displays with digital inputs, such as Digital Visual Interface (DVI), High-Definition Multimedia Interface, (HDMI), DisplayPort, etc.. must support a digital monitor link protection mechanism such as High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP).

Additional Information

 

Business Justification

Digital link protection mechanisms such as High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) are utilized to protect premium digital content sent over digital connectors from a source to a display monitor. Hence media playback applications will attempt to turn on HDCP if it is not already on. If HDCP fails, then the application may choose to not play the content, or constrict the content. As of Jan 2009, even DVD playback requires HDCP when playing on digital connectors.

Enforcement Date

Jun. 26, 2013

Device.Display.Monitor.EDID

Display device implements the EDID data structure

 

Target Feature

Device.Display.Monitor

Applies to

Windows 7 Client x86, x64

Windows 8 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT)

Windows 8.1 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT 8.1)

Windows Server 2012 R2 x64

Windows Server 2008 Release 2 x64

Windows Server 2012 x64

Description

The monitor must transmit an EDID structure that contains all required fields, as defined in VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identification Data Standard (E-EDID), Release A, Section 3. This EDID must also contain a unique Manufacturer Name, Product code ID and Serial Number. (Serial number is not required for an integrated panel on a mobile or all in one system.) For analog CRTs, EDID content must indicate at least one VESA mode at 75 Hz or higher for each supported resolution.All monitors must support E-EDID by implementing an EDID 1.3 or later data structure that:

Includes timing data for the preferred display mode in Timing #1.

For an LCD or other fixed-format display, this display mode is the native, progressively scanned mode of the panel.

For other display types, this is the optimal, progressively scanned display mode, which is based on the size and capabilities of the device and must meet the requirements for refresh rates defined above.

Implements the screen size or aspect ratio fields, bytes 0x15 and 0x16 per the supported EDID version with accurate dimensions.

Sets byte 0x18, Bit 1 to indicate that the preferred mode meaning per the supported EDID version.

Includes a unique serial number in at least one of the ID Serial Number field or a Display Product Serial Number string in one of the base block 18 byte descriptors.

Implements a Display Product Name string in one of the base block 18 byte descriptors, optional for an integrated panel. This string must be suitable for user interface usage.

Implements a Display Range Limits in one of the base block 18 byte descriptors, unless the device is a Non-Continuous Frequency (multi-mode) display.

Mobile and other all-in-one systems must transmit an EDID structure in one of three ways:

LCD panel provides one, which is similar to an externally attached monitor.

If the LCD panel does not provide one, then the WDDM miniport is responsible for defining and providing it to the operating system.

The WDDM driver may execute the ACPI _DDC method on the child device associated with the internal panel to retrieve an EDID from the system BIOS.

Display devices which implement features such as more than 8 bits per primary color must use EDID 1.4 in order to ensure these capabilities can be expressed to the OS and applications.Design Notes:The ACPI specification defines the method to acquire the EDID from the BIOS to achieve equivalent functionality as specified in ACPI 2.0b, Appendix B, or later.

Additional Information

 

Business Justification

LCD panels only support one native resolution. All other resolutions need to be scaled to be displayed on the panel. Therefore LCD panels provide the user with the best experience (text and video playback) when the display is set to its native resolution. Especially for clarity of text, Windows has implemented specific features like ClearType and High DPI.

Enforcement Date

Jun. 26, 2013

Device.Display.Monitor.Modes

Requirement for resolution support for Display Devices

 

Target Feature

Device.Display.Monitor

Applies to

Windows 7 Client x86, x64

Windows 8 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT)

Windows 8.1 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT 8.1)

Windows Server 2012 R2 x64

Windows Server 2008 Release 2 x64

Windows Server 2012 x64

Description

A display device can have multiple connectors. The following are the required modes that a display must support on each connector and indicate the support via the EDID (a display is free to support additional modes and call them out in the EDID as well)For an integrated panel: The native resolution of the panel must be greater than or equal to 1024 x 768. The native resolution must be supported at 60 Hz progressive or greater or the closest frequency appropriate for the region. For HD15, DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort connector: The native resolution of the panel must be greater than or equal to 1024 x 768. The native resolution must be supported at 60 Hz progressive or greater or the closest frequency appropriate for the region.The following modes must be supported by the display and included in the Established timings in the EDID

640 x 480 at 60 Hz progressive (Byte 23h, bit 5 in the Established timing)

800 x 600 at 60 Hz progressive (Byte 23h, bit 0 in the Established timing)

1024 x 768 at 60 Hz progressive (Byte 24h, bit 3 in the Established timing)

These modes can be supported as full screen or centeredFor all other connectors like S-Video, Component, and Composite: The connector must support the maximum allowable mode as defined in the specification of the standard.

Additional Information

 

Business Justification

Windows UI looks the best on a display that is running at its native resolution. The reason for this is that the pixels are displayed on the screen with no scaling. Also advanced technologies like ClearType are able to operate at a sub pixel level to optimize the clarity of the text. Therefore it is critical for a display to support its native mode.On Windows 8, on an integrated panel, Windows will always use the native mode for all scenarios. Therefore it is not necessary for the integrated panel to support other modes.On Windows 8, running on a WDDM 1.0 or WDDM 1.1 driver, Windows uses the 640 x 480 mode for displaying the bug check screen.On Windows 8, the default mode used by the Basic Display driver on an external monitor is 1024 x 768. This is because many legacy BIOS can most reliably set this mode.Windows UI is optimized to run on modes that are 1024 x 768 and greater. Therefore it is critical that each display device supports this mode because it would give the user the opportunity to select it at a later time

Enforcement Date

Jun. 26, 2013

Device.Display.Monitor.Stereoscopic3DModes

A Stereo 3D External Display or Internal Mobile Panel must support a Stereo mode equivalent to its native or preferred resolution.

 

Target Feature

Device.Display.Monitor

Applies to

Windows 8 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT)

Windows 8.1 Client x86, x64, ARM (Windows RT 8.1)

Windows Server 2012 R2 x64

Windows Server 2012 x64

Description

The native or preferred resolution of the Stereo 3D Display must have an equivalent Stereo mode. The native or preferred resolution of the Display is exposed through its EDID.Example: If the native resolution of the Stereo 3D Display is 1920 x 1200 in Mono, then it must also support the same native resolution in the Stereo mode.

Additional Information

 

Enforcement Date

Jun. 26, 2013