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Recordset: How AddNew, Edit, and Delete Work (ODBC)

This article applies to the MFC ODBC classes. For DAO recordsets, see the article DAO Recordset.

This article explains how the AddNew, Edit, and Delete member functions of class CRecordset work. Topics covered include:

Note   This article applies to objects derived from CRecordset in which bulk row fetching has not been implemented. If you are using bulk row fetching, see the article Recordset: Fetching Records in Bulk (ODBC).

As a supplement, you might want to read the article Record Field Exchange: How RFX Works, which describes the corresponding role of RFX in update operations.

Adding a Record

Adding a new record to a recordset involves calling the recordset's AddNew member function, setting the values of the new record's field data members, and calling the Update member function to write the record to the data source.

As a precondition for calling AddNew, the recordset must not have been opened as read-only. The CanUpdate and CanAppend member functions let you determine these conditions.

When you call AddNew:

  1. The record in the edit buffer is stored, so its contents can be restored if the operation is canceled.
  2. The field data members are flagged so it will be possible to detect changes in them later. The field data members are also marked "clean" (unchanged) and set to a Null.

After you call AddNew, the edit buffer represents a new, empty record, ready to be filled in with values. To do this, you manually set the values by assigning to them. Instead of specifying an actual data value for a field, you can call SetFieldNull to specify the value Null.

To commit your changes, you call Update.

When you call Update for the new record:

  • If your ODBC driver supports the ::SQLSetPos ODBC API function, MFC uses the function to add the record on the data source. With ::SQLSetPos, MFC can add a record more efficiently because it doesn't have to construct and process a SQL statement.
  • If ::SQLSetPos can't be used, MFC does the following:
    1. If no changes are detected, Update does nothing and returns 0.
    2. If there are changes, Update constructs a SQL INSERT statement. The columns represented by all dirty field data members are listed in the INSERT statement. To force a column to be included, call the SetFieldDirty member function:
      SetFieldDirty( &m_dataMember, TRUE );
      
    3. Update commits the new record — the INSERT statement is executed and the record is committed to the table on the data source (and the recordset, if not a snapshot) unless a transaction is in progress (see How Transactions Affect Updates in the article Recordset: More About Updates).
    4. The stored record is restored to the edit buffer. The record that was current before the AddNew call is current again regardless of whether the INSERT statement was successfully executed.
    Tip   For complete control of a new record, take the following approach: (a) set the values of any fields that will have values; (b) explicitly set any fields that will remain Null by calling SetFieldNull with a pointer to the field and the parameter TRUE (the default). If you want to ensure that a field is not written to the data source, call SetFieldDirty with a pointer to the field and the parameter FALSE, and do not modify the field's value. To determine whether a field is allowed to be Null, call IsFieldNullable.
    Tip   Advanced: To detect when recordset data members change value, MFC uses a PSEUDO_NULL value appropriate to each data type that you can store in a recordset. If you must explicitly set a field to the PSEUDO_NULL value and the field happens already to be marked Null, you must also call SetFieldNull, passing the address of the field in the first parameter and FALSE in the second parameter.

Visibility of Added Records

When is an added record visible to your recordset? Added records sometimes show up and sometimes aren't visible, depending on two things:

  • What your driver is capable of.
  • What the framework can take advantage of.

If your ODBC driver supports the ::SQLSetPos ODBC API function, MFC uses the function to add records. With ::SQLSetPos, added records are visible to any updatable MFC recordset. Without support for the function, added records are not visible, and you must call Requery to see them. Using ::SQLSetPos is also more efficient.

Editing an Existing Record

Editing an existing record in a recordset involves scrolling to the record, calling the recordset's Edit member function, setting the values of the new record's field data members, and calling the Update member function to write the changed record to the data source.

As a precondition for calling Edit, the recordset must be updatable and on a record. The CanUpdate and IsDeleted member functions let you determine these conditions. The current record also must not already have been deleted, and there must be records in the recordset (both IsBOF and IsEOF return 0).

When you call Edit, the record in the edit buffer (the current record) is stored. The stored record's values are later used to detect whether any fields have changed.

After you call Edit, the edit buffer still represents the current record but is now ready to accept changes to the field data members. To change the record, you manually set the values of any field data members you want to edit. Instead of specifying an actual data value for a field, you can call SetFieldNull to specify the value Null. To commit your changes, call Update.

Tip   To get out of AddNew or Edit mode, call Move with the parameter AFX_MOVE_REFRESH.

As a precondition for calling Update, the recordset must not be empty and the current record must not have been deleted. IsBOF, IsEOF, and IsDeleted should all return 0.

When you call Update for the edited record:

  • If your ODBC driver supports the ::SQLSetPos ODBC API function, MFC uses the function to update the record on the data source. With ::SQLSetPos, the driver compares your edit buffer with the corresponding record on the server, updating the record on the server if the two are different. With ::SQLSetPos, MFC can update a record more efficiently because it doesn't have to construct and process a SQL statement.

    -or-

  • If ::SQLSetPos cannot be used, MFC does the following:
    1. If there have been no changes, Update does nothing and returns 0.
    2. If there are changes, Update constructs a SQL UPDATE statement. The columns listed in the UPDATE statement are based on the field data members that have changed.
    3. Update commits the changes — executes the UPDATE statement — and the record is changed on the data source, but not committed if a transaction is in progress (see the article Transaction: Performing a Transaction in a Recordset (ODBC) for details about how the transaction affects the update). ODBC keeps a copy of the record, which also changes.
    4. Unlike the process for AddNew, the Edit process does not restore the stored record. The edited record remains in place as the current record.
    Caution   When you prepare to update a recordset by calling Update, take care that your recordset includes all columns making up the primary key of the table (or all of the columns of any unique index on the table, or enough columns to uniquely identify the row). In some cases, the framework can use only the columns selected in your recordset to identify which record in your table to update. Without all the necessary columns, multiple records may be updated in the table. In this case, the framework will throw exceptions when you call Update.
    Tip   If you call AddNew or Edit after having called either function previously but before you call Update, the edit buffer is refreshed with the stored record, replacing the new or edited record in progress. This behavior gives you a way to abort an AddNew or Edit and begin a new one: if you determine that the record-in-progress is faulty, simply call Edit or AddNew again.

Deleting a Record

Deleting a record from a recordset involves scrolling to the record and calling the recordset's Delete member function. Unlike AddNew and Edit, Delete does not require a matching call to Update.

As a precondition for calling Delete, the recordset must be updatable and it must be on a record. The CanUpdate, IsBOF, IsEOF, and IsDeleted member functions let you determine these conditions.

When you call Delete:

  • If your ODBC driver supports the ::SQLSetPos ODBC API function, MFC uses the function to delete the record on the data source. Using ::SQLSetPos is usually more efficient than using SQL.

    -or-

  • If ::SQLSetPos can't be used, MFC does the following:
    1. The current record in the edit buffer is not backed up as in AddNew and Edit.
    2. Delete constructs a SQL DELETE statement that will remove the record.

      The current record in the edit buffer is not stored as in AddNew and Edit.

    3. Delete commits the deletion — executes the DELETE statement. The record is marked deleted on the data source and, if the record is a snapshot, in ODBC.
    4. The deleted record's values are still in the field data members of the recordset, but the field data members are marked Null and the recordset's IsDeleted member function will return a nonzero value.
    Note   After deleting a record, you should scroll to another record to refill the edit buffer with the new record's data. It's an error to call Delete again, or to call Edit.

For information about the SQL statements used in update operations, see the article SQL.

See Also

Recordset (ODBC) | Recordset: More About Updates (ODBC) | Record Field Exchange

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