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Bug Check 0x19: BAD_POOL_HEADER

The BAD_POOL_HEADER bug check has a value of 0x00000019. This indicates that a pool header is corrupt.

Important Info If You Have Received a STOP Code

bsod

If you received a blue screen error, or stop code, the computer has shut down abruptly to protect itself from data loss.

For information about how to recover from this error, see Resolving Blue Screen errors in Windows.

BAD_POOL_HEADER Parameters

The following parameters are displayed on the blue screen. Parameter 1 indicates the type of violation. The meaning of the other parameters depends on the value of Parameter 1.

Parameter 1Parameter 2Parameter 3Parameter 4Cause of Error

0x2

The pool entry being checked

The size of the pool block

0

The special pool pattern check failed.

(The owner has likely corrupted the pool block.)

0x3

The pool entry being checked

The read-back flink freelist value

The read-back blink freelist value

The pool freelist is corrupt.

(In a healthy list, the values of Parameters 2, 3, and 4 should be identical.)

0x5

One of the pool entries

Reserved

The other pool entry

A pair of adjacent pool entries have headers that contradict each other. At least one of them is corrupt.

0x6

One incorrectly-calculated entry

Reserved

The bad entry that caused the miscalculation

The pool block header's previous size is too large.

0x7

0

Reserved

The bad pool entry

The pool block header size is corrupt.

0x8

0

Reserved

The bad pool entry

The pool block header size is zero.

0x9

One incorrectly-calculated entry

Reserved

The bad entry that caused the miscalculation

The pool block header size is corrupted (it is too large).

0xA

The pool entry that should have been found

Reserved

The virtual address of the page that should have contained the pool entry

The pool block header size is corrupt.

0xD, 0xE, 0xF, 0x23, 0x24, 0x25

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

The pool header of a freed block has been modified after it was freed. This is not typically the fault of the prior owner of the freed block; instead it is usually (but not always) due to the block preceding the freed block being overrun.

0x20

The pool entry that should have been found

The next pool entry

Reserved

The pool block header size is corrupt.

0X21

The pool pointer being freed

The number of bytes allocated for the pool block

The corrupted value found following the pool block

The data following the pool block being freed is corrupt. Typically this means the consumer (call stack) has overrun the block.

0X22

The address being freed

Reserved

Reserved

An address being freed does not have a tracking entry. This is usually because the call stack is trying to free a pointer that either has already been freed or was never allocated to begin with.

 

Cause

The pool is already corrupted at the time of the current request.

This may or may not be due to the caller.

Resolution

The internal pool links must be walked to figure out a possible cause of the problem.

Then you can use special pool for the suspect pool tags, or use Driver Verifier on the suspect driver. The !analyze extension may be of help in pinpointing the suspect driver, but this is frequently not the case with pool corrupters.

 

 

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