No Reboot Feature

Driver Verifier takes advantage of the changes in memory management in Windows Vista and later versions of the Windows operating system to provide a significant feature: the ability to activate most options, and add and remove drivers for verification without restarting ("rebooting") the computer.

Specifically, in the version of Driver Verifier included in Windows Vista and later versions of the Windows operating system:

  • You can start a verification of any driver without rebooting, even if Driver Verifier is not already running. The requirement that Driver Verifier be verifying another driver before rebooting ("restarting") Windows is eliminated.

  • You can start a verification of a driver that is already loaded. The requirement that drivers load after starting Driver Verifier is eliminated.

  • You can activate or deactivate most Driver Verifier options without rebooting. Again, Driver Verifier need not be running to change options.

This new functionality is designed to eliminate time spent on disruptive reboots, allow you to use Driver Verifier on production servers that cannot afford to reboot, and allow you to monitor your driver while you attach and remove devices.

For information about the memory management changes in Windows Vista that make the no-reboot feature possible, see the Windows Memory Management page on the Windows Hardware and Driver Quality website.

A Few Qualifications

There are a few qualifications, however.

  • The no-reboot feature is available only on the version of Driver Verifier included in Windows Vista and later versions of Windows.

  • You cannot activate or deactivate the DDI compliance checking, Concurrency stress test, SCSI Verification, Storport Verification, or Disk Integrity Checking options without rebooting.

  • You cannot stop the verification of a driver without rebooting if the driver is currently loaded. However, you can deactivate all of the Driver Verifier options without rebooting, thereby minimizing the overhead until the next reboot.

  • Drivers that are verified after they are loaded and without rebooting are not monitored as thoroughly as drivers are if they are loaded after a reboot. Whenever possible, enable the driver for verification, and then reboot the computer.

  • The options and drivers that you select without rebooting are effective immediately, but they are lost when you shut down or restart the system.

Using the No-Reboot Feature

You can use the no-reboot feature in Driver Verifier Manager or at the command line. To start or stop a verification, or change options without rebooting, use the procedures established for volatile settings.

The following examples show you how to use the no-reboot feature at the command line by adding the /volatile parameter.

To start or stop the verification of a driver without rebooting:


verifier /volatile /adddriver DriverName.sys
verifier /volatile /removedriver DriverName.sys

You can use this command syntax to add (start the verification) of any driver, even a driver that is currently loaded. Commands to remove (stop the verification) of a driver that is currently loaded will fail. As always, the verification of a driver that is not loaded will begin as soon as the driver is loaded.

To activate or deactivate options without rebooting:


verifier /volatile /flags Options

You can use this command syntax with any Driver Verifier option, except for SCSI Verification and Disk Integrity Checking. For example,


verifier /volatile /flags 0x20

This command activates the deadlock detection option without rebooting.

To turn off all Driver Verifier options:

You cannot stop the verification of a driver that is currently loaded without rebooting. However, you can use the following command syntax to deactivate all of the Driver Verifier options without rebooting, thereby minimizing the overhead until the next reboot.


verifier /volatile /flags 0

Driver Verifier continues to monitor the driver using the options in the Automatic Checks feature, which cannot be turned off, but the overhead is reduced to approximately ten percent of the overhead of a typical verification.

 

 

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Build date: 5/7/2013

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