Framework File Objects

When an application or a driver attempts to access a device, typically by creating or opening a file, the operating system sends a file creation request to the driver stack. When the application or driver has finished using the device, the system sends file cleanup and close requests to the driver stack. The request types of these three requests are WdfRequestTypeCreate, WdfRequestTypeCleanup, and WdfRequestTypeClose, respectively.

Typically, unless your driver has called WdfDeviceInitSetExclusive, the driver must perform file-specific or other access-specific operations when it receives file creation, cleanup, and close requests, because multiple files can be open simultaneously or multiple applications can access the device simultaneously. The driver must therefore keep track of the I/O requests that are associated with each file or application.

The framework defines framework file objects, which represent an application or driver's means for accessing a device, such as a file, directory, volume, mail slot, named pipe, or the entire device. A file name can be associated with a file object, but the meaning of a file name is driver-specific. For more information about file names, see Controlling Device Namespace Access.

If your driver must handle file operations, it must call WdfDeviceInitSetFileObjectConfig from within its EvtDriverDeviceAdd callback function. The WdfDeviceInitSetFileObjectConfig method receives a WDF_FILEOBJECT_CONFIG structure as input. The driver uses this structure to register its EvtDeviceFileCreate, EvtFileCleanup, and EvtFileClose callback functions and, optionally, to indicate whether the framework should create a framework file object each time that the driver receives a file creation request.

Most drivers that handle file operations store file-specific information in the framework file object's context space. If your driver handles file operations but does not need to store information in a file object's context space, the framework does not have to create framework file objects for the driver.

Creating or Opening a File

When the framework receives a file creation request for your function driver, it:

  1. Creates a framework file object that represents the file, unless the driver previously indicated that it does not need to use framework file objects.

  2. Calls your driver's EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function, if the driver has registered the callback function.

The EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function typically obtains information about the file, such as its name and file object flags. The driver typically stores this information in the context space of the framework file object.

Instead of providing an EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function, the driver can call WdfDeviceConfigureRequestDispatching to set an I/O queue to receive all file creation requests (WdfRequestTypeCreate request type). The driver will subsequently receive file creation requests in the queue's EvtIoDefault request handler. (An I/O queue cannot receive file creation requests if the DefaultQueue member of the queue's WDF_IO_QUEUE_CONFIG structure is set to TRUE.)

If your driver does not provide an EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function and does not set up an I/O queue to handle WdfRequestTypeCreate-typed I/O requests, the framework:

  • Completes all file creation requests for the driver with a status value of STATUS_SUCCESS, if your driver is a function driver.

  • Forwards all file creation requests to the next-lower driver, if your driver is a filter driver.

(To see how you can change this behavior, see the AutoForwardCleanupClose member of the WDF_FILEOBJECT_CONFIG structure.)

Note   If your function driver does not provide any device interfaces that applications can use to access the driver's devices, the driver must provide an EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function that completes all file creation requests with a status value for which NT_SUCCESS(status) equals FALSE. Otherwise, a malicious application might attempt to access a device by using the name of the device's physical device object (PDO). (All PDOs have names.)

If a driver forwards a creation request to an I/O target, the driver must not subsequently complete the request with a failure status value unless the driver receives a failure status value from the I/O target. Otherwise, the lower drivers will not be notified that the creation request failed and might attempt to operate as if the file is open.

If a driver forwards a creation request to an I/O target, the driver cannot set the WDF_REQUEST_SEND_OPTION_SEND_AND_FORGET flag if the framework has created a framework file object for the creation request. Therefore, the driver cannot set the WDF_REQUEST_SEND_OPTION_SEND_AND_FORGET flag for a creation request unless it also sets the WdfFileObjectNotRequired flag.

Note that if a driver completes a creation request with an error status, the framework deletes the framework file object but does not call the driver's EvtFileCleanup or EvtFileClose callback functions. Therefore, if the driver allocates extra object-specific memory outside of the file object's context space it must provide an EvtCleanupCallback or EvtDestroyCallback callback function that deletes the allocated memory.

For Windows Vista and later, file creation requests can be canceled. Earlier versions of the Windows operating system do not support canceling file creation requests.

The system always creates a Windows Driver Model (WDM) file object for each creation request that comes from a user application. If a driver sends a creation request, it might not create a WDM file object for the request. Typically, the framework does not create a framework file object if a WDM file object is not present. However, if your driver has called WdfDeviceInitSetExclusive and if the driver has set WdfFileObjectWdfCannotUseFsContexts in the FileObjectClass member of the WDF_FILEOBJECT_CONFIG structure, the framework will create a framework file object even if a WDM file object does not exist.

Obtaining File Information

The driver's EvtDeviceFileCreate callback function can call one or more of the following object methods to obtain information about an application or driver's access to a device:

WdfFileObjectGetFileName

Returns the file name that is contained in a framework file object.

WdfFileObjectGetFlags

Returns the flags that are contained within a framework file object.

WdfFileObjectWdmGetFileObject

Returns the WDM file object that is associated with a framework file object.

WdfRequestGetParameters

Retrieves the parameters that are associated with a framework request object. If the request type is WdfRequestTypeCreate, the Parameters.Create member of the WDF_REQUEST_PARAMETERS structure contains information about the file creation request.

Typically, the driver stores file information in the framework file object's context space. When your driver obtains an I/O request from one if its I/O queues, the driver can call WdfRequestGetFileObject to obtain a handle to the framework file object that is associated with the request. The driver can then retrieve the file information that it stored in the framework file object's context space.

Your driver can search an I/O queue for requests that are associated with a particular file by calling WdfIoQueueRetrieveRequestByFileObject.

If your driver has a pointer to a WDM DEVICE_OBJECT structure, the driver can call WdfDeviceGetFileObject to obtain a handle to the framework file object that is associated with the WDM device object.

Closing a File

When an application or another driver closes a file, the framework receives a cleanup request and a close request for your driver. The framework:

  1. Calls your driver's EvtFileCleanup and EvtFileClose callback functions, if the driver has registered these callback functions.

  2. Deletes the framework file object that represents the file.

The driver's EvtFileCleanup and EvtFileClose callback functions receive a handle to the framework file object. The driver can call WdfFileObjectGetDevice to determine which framework device object is associated with the framework file object.

 

 

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