Do you need to write a driver?

Microsoft Windows contains built-in drivers for many device types. If there is a built-in driver for your device type, you won't need to write your own driver. Your device can use the built-in driver.

Built-in drivers for USB devices

If your device belongs to a device class that is defined by the USB Device Working Group (DWG), there may already be an existing Windows USB class driver for it. For more information, see Drivers for the Supported USB Device Classes.

Built-in drivers for other devices

Currently, Microsoft provides built-in drivers for the following other types of devices:

Device Technology and DriverBuilt-in driverWindows supportDescription

ACPI: ACPI driver

Acpi.sys

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for basic ACPI device functionality by means of the Acpi.sys driver and ACPI BIOS. To enhance the functionality of an ACPI device, the vendor can supply a WDM function driver. For more information about Windows ACPI support, see Supporting ACPI Devices in the ACPI Design Guide.

Audio: Microsoft Audio Class driver

PortCls.sys

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for basic audio rendering and audio capture via its Port Class driver (PortCls). It is the responsibility of the hardware vendor of an audio device, to provide an adapter driver to work with PortCls. The adapter driver includes initialization code, driver-management code (including the DriverEntry function) and a collection of audio miniport drivers. For more information, see Introduction to Port Class.

Buses: Native SD bus driver, native SD storage class driver, and storage miniport driver

sdbus.sys, sffdisk.sys, sffp_sd.sys

Windows Vista and later

Microsoft provides support for SD card readers as follows: The operating system provides support for SD host controllers that connect directly to the PCI bus. When the system enumerates an SD host controller, it loads a native SD bus driver (sdbus.sys). If a user inserts an SD memory card, Windows loads a native SD storage class driver (sffdisk.sys) and storage miniport driver (sffp_sd.sys) on top of the bus driver. If a user inserts an SD card with a different kind of function, such as GPS or wireless LAN, Windows loads a vendor-supplied driver for the device.

HID: HID I2C driver

HIDI2C.sys

Windows 8 and later

Microsoft provides support for HID over I2C devices on SoC systems that support Simple Peripheral Bus (SPB) and general-purpose I/O (GPIO). It does so by means of the HIDI2C.sys driver. For more information, see HID over I2C.

HID: Legacy game port driver

HidGame.sys, Gameenum.sys

Windows Vista

Windows Server 2003

Windows XP

In Windows Vista and earlier, Microsoft provided support for legacy (non-USB, non-Bluetooth, non-I2C) game ports by means of the HidGame.sys and Gameenum.sys drivers. For more information, see HID Transports Supported in Windows.

HID: Legacy keyboard class driver

Kbdclass.sys

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for legacy (non-USB, non-Bluetooth, non-I2C) keyboards by means of the Kbdclass.sys driver. For more information, see Keyboard and mouse HID client drivers. To enhance the functionality of a legacy keyboard, the vendor can supply a keyboard filter driver. For more information, see the Kbfiltr sample in the MSDN Code Gallery.

HID: Legacy mouse class driver

Mouclass.sys

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for legacy (non-USB, non-Bluetooth, non-I2C) mice by means of the Mouclass.sys driver. Keyboard and mouse HID client drivers. To enhance the functionality of a legacy mouse, the vendor can supply a mouse filter driver. For more information, see the Moufiltr sample in the MSDN Code Gallery.

HID: PS/2 (i8042prt) driver

I8042prt.sys

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for legacy PS/2 keyboards and mice by means of the I8042.sys driver. To enhance the functionality of a PS/2 mouse or keyboard, the vendor can supply a keyboard or mouse filter driver. For more information, see the Kbfiltr sample and Moufiltr sample in the MSDN Code Gallery.

Imaging: Web Services for Devices (WSD) scan class driver

WSDScan.sys

Windows Vista and later

Microsoft provides support for web services scanners (that is, scanners that are meant to be used over the web) by means of the WSD scan driver (wsdscan.sys). However, a web services scanner device that supports WSD Distributed Scan Management must implement two web services protocols. For more information, see WIA with Web Services for Devices.

Print: Microsoft Plotter Driver

Msplot

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for plotters that support the Hewlett-Packard Graphics Language by means of the Microsoft Plotter Driver (Msplot). To enhance the functionality of a plotter, you can create a minidriver, which consists of one or more plotter characterization data (PCD) files. For more information, see Plotter Driver Minidrivers.

Print: Microsoft PostScript Printer Driver

Pscript

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for PostScript printers by means of the PostScript Printer Driver (Pscript). To enhance the functionality of a PostScript printer, you can create a minidriver, which consists of one or more PostScript Printer Description (PPD) files and font (NTF) files. For more information, see Pscript Minidrivers.

Print: Microsoft Universal Printer Driver

Unidrv

Windows XP and later

Microsoft provides support for non-PostScript printers by means of the Universal Printer Driver (Unidrv). To enhance the functionality of a non-PostScript printer, you can create a minidriver, which consists of one or more generic printer description (GPD) files. For more information, see Microsoft Universal Printer Driver.

Print: Microsoft v4 Printer Driver

Windows 8 and later

Beginning with Windows 8, Microsoft provides a single in-box class driver that supports PostScript and non-PostScript printers as well as plotters. This driver supersedes the Microsoft Plotter Driver, Microsoft Universal Printer Driver, and Microsoft PostScript Printer Driver. Used on its own, without modification, this printer driver provides basic printing support. For more information, see V4 Printer Driver.

Print: Microsoft XPS Printer Driver

XPSDrv

Windows Vista and later

Microsoft provides support for printing the XPS document format with the XPS Printer Driver (XPSDrv). This driver extends Microsoft's GDI-based, version 3 printer driver architecture to support consuming XML Paper Specification (XPS) documents. With an XPSDrv printer driver, the XPS Document format is used as a spool file format and as a document file format. Used on its own, without modification, the XPSDrv printer driver provides support for basic XPS printing. For more information, see XPSDrv Printer Drivers.

Sensors: Sensor HID class driver

SensorsHIDClassDriver.dll

Windows 8 and later

Microsoft provides support for pen and touch devices by means of an HID class driver. Because Windows 8 includes this HID class driver and corresponding HID I2C and HID USB miniport drivers, you do not need to implement your own driver. You only need to report the usages described in this white paper in the firmware for your pointer device. Windows will use your firmware and its own HID driver to enable touch and pointer capabilities for your device and furnish the Windows touch and pointer APIs with access to your device.

Touch: Windows pointer device driver

Windows 8 and later

Microsoft provides support for pen and touch devices by means of an HID class driver. Because Windows 8 includes this HID class driver and corresponding HID I2C and HID USB miniport drivers, you do not need to implement your own driver. You only need to report the usages described in this white paper in the firmware for your pointer device. Windows will use your firmware and its own HID driver to enable touch and pointer capabilities for your device and furnish the Windows touch and pointer APIs with access to your device.

WPD: Media Transfer Protocol class driver

WpdMtpDr.dll, WpdMtp.dll,WpdMtpUs.dll, WpdConns.dll, and WpdUsb.sys

Windows Vista and later

Microsoft provides support for portable devices that require connectivity with Windows, such as music players, digital cameras, cellular phones, and health-monitoring devices, by means of the Media Transfer Protocol class driver. A vendor that uses this class driver must implement the MTP class protocol on the device. (For digital still cameras, your MTP implementation should be backward compatible with PTP.) For more information, see Guidance for the Hardware Vendor.

 

 

 

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