Application Compatibility: Compatibility Risks

Deprecated Components

The following components from earlier Windows releases will not be present in Windows Vista® and Windows Server® 2008:

  • Kernel-mode printer driver support—all printer drivers will now have to follow the user-mode driver framework. All kernel-mode printer drivers will be blocked from loading on Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. For more information, see User-Mode Driver Framework (UMDF).

  • Windows Help for 32-bit applications (WinHlp32.exe)—Windows Help is not supported, and some of the Windows Help code has been removed for the release. To view 32-bit Help files with the .hlp filename extension in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, you will need to download and install Windows Help from the Microsoft Download Center. For more information, see Application Compatibility: Help Engine Support.

    NoteNote:

    HTML Help and .chm files will continue to be supported for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.

  • Microsoft® FrontPage® server extensions—Windows® SharePoint® Services now provides an enhanced feature set to the developer community.

  • Services for Macintosh—there is no replacement for this component.

  • D3DRM—DirectX will be the only supported graphics package for Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.

  • Web Publishing Wizard—there is no replacement for this component.

  • NTLMSSSP Service.

  • Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) Driver Extensions Services.

  • RPC-Locator Service.

  • POP3 Email Server—there is no replacement for this component.

  • NetDDE—for security reasons, Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 does not support Network DDE (NetDDE). (NetDDE is disabled by default on Windows XP® Service Pack 2 and Windows Server® 2003.) Regular DDE is still supported. NetDDE is a technology that allows applications that use the DDE transport to transparently exchange data over a network. The result is the application fails to exchange data over the network. To work around this problem, use a different networking technology, such as DCOM or Windows Communication Foundation.

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