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ImageBrush Class

Paints an area with an image.

Namespace:  System.Windows.Media
Assembly:  PresentationCore (in PresentationCore.dll)
XMLNS for XAML: http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation, http://schemas.microsoft.com/netfx/2007/xaml/presentation

public sealed class ImageBrush : TileBrush
<ImageBrush .../>

An ImageBrush is a type of TileBrush that defines its content as an image, which is specified by its ImageSource property. You can control how the image is stretched, aligned, and tiled, enabling you to produce patterns and other effects. The following images show some effects that can be achieved with an ImageBrush.

An ImageBrush can paint shapes, controls, text, and more

ImageBrush output examples

As mentioned, an ImageBrush paints an area with an ImageSource. The most common type of ImageSource to use with an ImageBrush is a BitmapImage, which describes a bitmap graphic. You can use a DrawingImage to paint using a Drawing object, but it is simpler to use a DrawingBrush instead. For more information about ImageSource objects, see Imaging Overview.

For more information about ImageBrush features, see Painting with Images, Drawings, and Visuals overview.

Freezable Features

Because the ImageBrush class inherits from Freezable, ImageBrush objects gain several special features, which include the following: they can be declared as resources, shared among multiple objects, made read-only to improve performance, cloned, and made thread safe. For more information about the features provided by Freezable objects, see Freezable Objects Overview.

This example shows how to use the ImageBrush class to paint an area with an image. An ImageBrush displays a single image, which is specified by its ImageSource property.

The following example paints the Background of a button by using an ImageBrush.

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace Microsoft.Samples.Graphics.UsingImageBrush
{

    public class PaintingWithImagesExample : Page
    {

        public PaintingWithImagesExample()
        {
            Background = Brushes.White;
            StackPanel mainPanel = new StackPanel();
            mainPanel.Margin = new Thickness(20.0);

            // Create a button.
            Button berriesButton = new Button();
            berriesButton.Foreground = Brushes.White;
            berriesButton.FontWeight = FontWeights.Bold;
            FontSizeConverter sizeConverter = new FontSizeConverter();
            berriesButton.FontSize = (Double)sizeConverter.ConvertFromString("16pt");
            berriesButton.FontFamily = new FontFamily("Verdana");
            berriesButton.Content = "Berries";
            berriesButton.Padding = new Thickness(20.0);
            berriesButton.HorizontalAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Left;

            // Create an ImageBrush.
            ImageBrush berriesBrush = new ImageBrush();
            berriesBrush.ImageSource =
                new BitmapImage(
                    new Uri(@"sampleImages\berries.jpg", UriKind.Relative)
                );

            // Use the brush to paint the button's background.
            berriesButton.Background = berriesBrush;

            mainPanel.Children.Add(berriesButton);
            this.Content = mainPanel;
        }
    }
}
<!-- This example shows how to use an ImageBrush to paint shapes and controls. -->
<Page  
  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
  xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" 
  Background="White">

  <StackPanel Margin="20">

    <!-- Sets the button's Background property with an 
         ImageBrush. The resulting
         button has an image as its background. -->
    <Button
     Foreground="White" FontWeight="Bold"
     FontSize="16pt" FontFamily="Verdana" 
     Content="Berries"
     Padding="20" 
     HorizontalAlignment="Left">
      <Button.Background>
        <ImageBrush ImageSource="sampleImages\berries.jpg" />
      </Button.Background>
    </Button>
  </StackPanel>
</Page>

By default, an ImageBrush stretches its image to completely fill the area that you are painting. In the preceding example, the image is stretched to fill the button, possibly distorting the image. You can control this behavior by setting the Stretch property of TileBrush to Uniform or UniformToFill, which causes the brush to preserve the aspect ratio of the image.

If you set the Viewport and TileMode properties of an ImageBrush, you can create a repeating pattern. The following example paints a button by using a pattern that is created from an image.

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace Microsoft.Samples.Graphics.UsingImageBrush
{

    public class TiledImageBrushExample : Page
    {

        public TiledImageBrushExample()
        {
            Background = Brushes.White;
            StackPanel mainPanel = new StackPanel();
            mainPanel.Margin = new Thickness(20.0);

            // Create a button.
            Button berriesButton = new Button();
            berriesButton.Foreground = Brushes.White;
            berriesButton.FontWeight = FontWeights.Bold;
            FontSizeConverter sizeConverter = new FontSizeConverter();
            berriesButton.FontSize = (Double)sizeConverter.ConvertFromString("16pt");
            berriesButton.FontFamily = new FontFamily("Verdana");
            berriesButton.Content = "Berries";
            berriesButton.Padding = new Thickness(20.0);
            berriesButton.HorizontalAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Left;

            // Create an ImageBrush.
            ImageBrush berriesBrush = new ImageBrush();
            berriesBrush.ImageSource =
                new BitmapImage(
                    new Uri(@"sampleImages\berries.jpg", UriKind.Relative)
                );

            // Set the ImageBrush's Viewport and TileMode 
            // so that it produces a pattern from 
            // the image.
            berriesBrush.Viewport = new Rect(0,0,0.5,0.5);
            berriesBrush.TileMode = TileMode.FlipXY;

            // Use the brush to paint the button's background.
            berriesButton.Background = berriesBrush;

            mainPanel.Children.Add(berriesButton);
            this.Content = mainPanel;
        }
    }
}
<!-- This example shows how to use an ImageBrush to paint shapes and controls. -->
<Page  
  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
  xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" 
  Background="White">

  <StackPanel Margin="20">

    <!-- Sets the button's Background property with an 
         ImageBrush. The resulting
         button has an image as its background. -->
    <Button
     Foreground="White" FontWeight="Bold"
     FontSize="16pt" FontFamily="Verdana" 
     Content="Berries"
     Padding="20" 
     HorizontalAlignment="Left">
      <Button.Background>

        <!-- The ImageBrush's Viewport and TileMode
             are set to produce a pattern from the
             image. -->
        <ImageBrush 
          Viewport="0,0,0.5,0.5" 
          TileMode="FlipXY"
          ImageSource="sampleImages\berries.jpg" />
      </Button.Background>
    </Button>
  </StackPanel>
</Page>

For more information about the ImageBrush class, see Painting with Images, Drawings, and Visuals.

This code example is part of a larger example that is provided for the ImageBrush class. For the complete sample, see ImageBrush Sample.

More Code

How to: Preserve the Aspect Ratio of an Image Used as a Background This example shows how to use the Stretch property of an ImageBrush in order to preserve the aspect ratio of the image.

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP SP2, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003

The .NET Framework and .NET Compact Framework do not support all versions of every platform. For a list of the supported versions, see .NET Framework System Requirements.

.NET Framework

Supported in: 3.5, 3.0

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