Using the Manifest Designer (Windows Store apps)

You can define aspects of your Windows Store app, such as tile behavior, access to resources, and publisher information, by using the App Manifest Designer. You can use the Manifest Designer to edit the package manifest file even if you don't know the details of the schema. You can launch the App Manifest Designer in two ways from within Visual Studio:

  • In Visual Studio Solution Explorer, open the package.appxmanifest file. The App Manifest Designer opens the manifest as a document with the name of the file displayed on a tab. You will not see the name App Manifest Designer in the document window, but you are in the correct place.

  • On the menu bar, choose Project, Store, Edit App Manifest.

    Note Note

    If you’re using Visual Studio Express 2012 for Windows 8, instead choose Store, Edit App Manifest.

The Manifest Designer has the following tabs:

You can find links to examples of app manifests that illustrate the schema and syntax for that property. The complete app manifests are included in the individual Windows Store apps in the Windows Dev Center. To access these apps, see Windows Store app samples.

Defines how your app tile appears on the user's Start screen, whether your app can display notifications to users, and the appearance of the app's splash screen, among other visual behaviors.

For more information, see the following topics:

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifDisplay Name

Specifies the friendly name for the app that is displayed to users. This string is localizable. You must not use two explicitly reserved words as the Display Name for apps that are uploaded to the Windows Store: "NoUIEntryPoints" and "NoUIEntryPoints-DesignMode". These identifiers are reserved for use by development tools and test suites.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifEntry Point

Specifies the class that runs when the app is activated (for example, Office.Winword.Class). If you specify this attribute but not the Start Page attribute, you must specify the Executable property. This property appears only for Visual Basic, Visual C#, and Visual C++ projects.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifStart Page

Specifies the name of the default launch HTML page for the app. This file must be present in the app package. If you specify this property, you can’t specify both the Entry Point and Executable properties. This property appears only for JavaScript projects.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifDescription

Optional. Specifies the text that describes the app in Default Programs in Control Panel. This string is localizable.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifSupported Rotations

Specifies the orientations in which the app would prefer to be shown for the best user experience: Landscape, Portrait, Landscape-flipped, or Portrait-flipped. On devices that can be rotated, such as tablets, the app won't be redrawn for orientations that aren't specified with this property. For instance, the app won't rotate if the device is rotated to a Portrait orientation but the property specifies only Landscape and Landscape-flipped orientations.

On devices that can't be rotated, an app might be shown in that device's default orientation, and the app's preferred orientation will be ignored. However, your app's preferred rotation will be honored on devices on which a rotation lock has been activated. These orientation preference choices apply to both the splash screen and the app UI when a new session is launched for your app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifVisual Assets

Use this section of the Application UI page to specify the appearance of your app tile and the images for the logo and the splash screen. For information about the images that your app needs, see Choosing your app images.

If you provide separate image files to enhance scaling on screens that have different pixel density, use this section to specify the name and the location of the image files. You can store the files in the same folder in your project if the file names include scale qualifiers (for example, Assets\Logo.Scale-100.png, Assets\Logo.Scale-140.png, and so forth). As an alternative, you can organize the files into scale-qualified folders (for example, Assets\Scale-100\Logo.png, Assets\Scale-140\Logo.png, and so forth).

Use the Scaled Assets boxes to specify the images to use for scaling on screens that have different pixel density. For more information, see Guidelines for scaling to pixel density (Windows Store apps).

Note Note

Visual Studio 2012 Update 1 supports multiscaling functionality.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifShort Name

Specifies a short name for the app that appears directly on the tile. This string is localizable.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifShow Name

Specifies the tile sizes, as expressed by their logo size, that should display the app's short name: square only, wide only, both, or neither.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifForeground Text

Sets the value of the text color relative to the background color on the app’s tile in Windows. The value is either “Light” or “Dark”.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gif(Tile) Background Color

Sets the background color for the app’s tile in Windows. The color is given as either a three-byte hexadecimal number preceded by #, such as #008800, or as a named color, such as maroon or teal. The background color specified here also applies to the button color in any app-owned dialog boxes and to the App Description page in the Store.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifLogo

Specifies the image that's used as the square tile for the app.

Use the Scaled Assets boxes to specify the images to use for scaling on screens that have different pixel density. Choose the Browse button to specify and add a logo file that has the appropriate dimensions for each box. This step will also rename the file to conform to the scale-naming convention that Windows 8 uses. For more information about how to scale images, see Quickstart: Using file or image resources.

Note Note

Choose an image in the box to display a larger view without having to build and run your app.

Where logo images are used

Scales and dimensions

Start screen

Scale-80 (120x120px)

Scale-100 (150x150px)

Scale-140 (210x210px)

Scale-180 (270x270px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifWide Logo

Specifies the wide version of the logo image, which appears when the tile appears in its wide format. If this image isn’t provided, the tile can display only in the square format and can’t accept notifications based on wide template types. The user can decide which format the tile uses, so we recommend including a wide logo image. If a wide logo image is provided, the tile will appear initially in its wide format.

Where wide logo images are used

Scales and dimensions

Start screen

Scale-80 (248x120px)

Scale-100 (310x150px)

Scale-140 (434x210px)

Scale-180 (558x270px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifSmall Logo

Specifies the small image that appears in the corner of the tile to identify the app.

sUse the Scale boxes to specify images based on percentage of the original size of the image. Use the Target size boxes to specify images at a particular size in pixels. Target size is typically used for square images or icons that appear in File Explorer on a desktop computer.

Where small logo images are used

Scales and Dimensions

Start screen apps view, search contract pane, Share pane

Scale-80 (24x24px)

Scale-100 (30x30x)

Scale-140 (42x42px)

Scale-180 (54x54px)

Icons in File Explorer and the Open With dialog box

Targetsize-16 (16x16px)

Targetsize-32 (32x32px)

Targetsize-48 (48x48px)

Targetsize-256 (256x256px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifStore Logo

Specifies the image that appears on your app in the Windows Store.

Where Store logo images are used

Scales and Dimensions

Windows Store

Scale-100 (50x50px)

Scale-140 (70x70px)

Scale-180 (90x90px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifBadge Logo

Specifies the image that appears next to the badge to identify the app. This image must be monochromatic, of type .png, and measure 24 x 24 pixels, unless you are using multiscaled images.

Where badge logo images are used

Scales and Dimensions

Lock Screen

Scale-100 (24x24px)

Scale-140 (33x33px)

Scale-180 (43x43px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifToast Capable

Sets whether the app can raise toast notifications. If Yes, the app can provide alerts; otherwise, it can’t. For more information, see Toast notification overview (Windows Store apps)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifLock Screen Notifications

Sets the type of tile that can appear for an app on the user’s lock screen. This type can either be simply a badge that displays either a number or a glyph to communicate status, or both a badge and text, which can display detailed status.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifSplash Screen

Sets the foreground image for the splash screen of the app.

Where splash screen images are used

Scales and Dimensions

App Launch Splash Screen

Scale-100 (620x300px)

Scale-140 (868x420px)

Scale-180 (1116x540px)

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gif(SplashScreen) Background Color

Sets the background color for the app’s splash screen. The color is given as either a three-byte hexadecimal number preceded by #, such as #008800, or as a named color, such as maroon or teal.

Use this page to specify the resources that your web app can access programmatically, such as the Pictures library or connected devices such as a webcam. For an overview of capabilities, see App capability declarations (Windows Store apps). Any capabilities chosen in the app manifest designer appear in the app manifest (the Package.appxmanifest file and the build output AppxManifest.xml file) within the <Capabilities> XML tags. For example, the Documents Library Access capability used by the file picker contracts is written as:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name="documentsLibrary" />
  </Capabilities>
Important noteImportant

If you run your app without a particular capability specified in the manifest file and then add the capability later, you must log out and log back into Windows to allow the change to be applied correctly.

For more information, see How to specify capabilities in a package manifest (Windows).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifCapabilities (Check Box List)

Allows the app to request access to features or devices.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifDescription

Describes the currently selected capability.

The list of specific features or devices that your app can use.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifDocuments Library

Enables adding, changing, or deleting files in the user’s Documents library. The package can access only file types that are declared by the File Type Association handler in the app manifest. For example, if a DOC reader app declared a .doc file type association, it can open .doc files but not other types of files in the Documents library. The package can’t access Document libraries on HomeGroup computers. Declare the Documents Library capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you can’t realize them by using the file picker.

  <Applications>
    <Application Id="FileAccessSample" Executable="FileAccess.exe" EntryPoint="FileAccess.App">
      <VisualElements DisplayName="File access C# sample" Logo="Assets\squareTile-sdk.png" SmallLogo="Assets\smallTile-sdk.png" Description="File access C# sample" ForegroundText="light" BackgroundColor="#00b2f0">
        <DefaultTile ShowName="allLogos" ShortName="File access C# sample" />
        <SplashScreen Image="Assets\splash-sdk.png" BackgroundColor="#00b2f0" />
      </VisualElements>
      <Extensions>
        <Extension Category="windows.fileTypeAssociation">
          <FileTypeAssociation Name="data">
            <EditFlags AlwaysUnsafe="true" />
            <SupportedFileTypes>
              <FileType>.dat</FileType>
            </SupportedFileTypes>
          </FileTypeAssociation>
        </Extension>
      </Extensions>
    </Application>
  </Applications>
  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name="documentsLibrary" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifEnterprise Authentication

Windows domain credentials enable a user to log into remote resources using their credentials, and act as if a user provided their user name and password. The Enterprise Authentication capability is typically used in line-of-business apps that connect to servers within an enterprise.

You don't need this capability for generic communication across the internet.

The Enterprise Authentication capability is intended to support common line-of-business apps. Don't declare it in apps that don't need to access corporate resources. The file picker provides a robust UI mechanism that enables users to open files on a network share for use with an app. Declare the Enterprise Authentication capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you can’t realize them by using the file picker. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" enterpriseAuthentication" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPrivate Networks (Client & Server)

The Private Networks (Client & Server capability provides inbound and outbound access to home and work networks through the firewall. This capability is typically used for games that communicate across the local area network (LAN), and for apps that share data across a variety of local devices. If your app specifies musicLibrary, picturesLibrary, or videosLibrary, you don't need to use this capability to access the corresponding library in a Home Group. Inbound access to critical ports is always blocked. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" privateNetworkClientServer" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifInternet (Client & Server)

The Internet (Client & Server) capability provides inbound and outbound access through the firewall to the Internet and public networks such as airports and coffee shops. Inbound access to critical ports is always blocked.The Internet (Client & Server) capability is typically used in peer-to-peer (P2P) scenarios in apps that use file share and VOIP. The Internet (Client & Server) capability includes the access that the Internet (Client) capability provides, so you don't need to specify Internet (Client) when you specify Internet (Client & Server). The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" internetClientServer" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifInternet (Client)

The Internet (Client) capability provides outbound access through the firewall to the Internet and public networks through the firewall like airports and coffee shops (that is, intranet networks where the user has designated the network as public). Most apps that require Internet access should use this capability. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" internetClient" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifLocation

The Location capability provides access to location functionality, which you get from dedicated hardware like a GPS sensor or is derived from available network info. Apps must handle the case where the user has disabled location services from the Settings charm. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    < DeviceCapability Name=" location" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifMicrophone

The Microphone capability provides access to the microphone’s audio feed, which allows the app to record audio from connected microphones. Apps must handle the case where the user has disabled the microphone from the Settings charm. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    < DeviceCapability Name=" microphone" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifMusic Library

The Music Library capability provides programmatic access to the user's Music library, allowing the app to enumerate and access all files in the library without user interaction. This capability is typically used in jukebox apps that need to access the entire Music library. The file picker provides a robust UI mechanism that enables users to open files for use with an app. Declare the Music Library capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you cannot realize them by using the file picker. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name="musicLibrary" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPictures Library

The Pictures Library capability provides programmatic access to the user's Pictures library, allowing the app to enumerate and access all files in the library without user interaction. This capability is typically used in photo playback apps that need to access the entire Pictures library.

The file picker provides a robust UI mechanism that enables users to open files for use with an app. Declare the Pictures Library capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you can’t realize them by using the file picker. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" picturesLibrary" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifProximity

The Proximity capability enables multiple devices in close proximity to communicate with one another. This capability is typically used in casual multi-player games and in apps that exchange information. Devices attempt to use the communication technology that provides the best possible connection, including Bluetooth, WiFi, and the Internet. This capability is used only to initiate communication between the devices. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <DeviceCapability Name="proximity" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifRemovable Storage

The Removable Storage capability provides programmatic access to files on removable storage, such as USB keys and external hard drives, filtered to the file type associations that are declared in the package manifest. For example, if a DOC reader app declared a .doc file type association, the app can open .doc files but not other types of files on the removable storage device. Be careful when declaring this capability, because users may include a variety of info in their removable storage devices and expect the app to provide a valid justification for programmatic access to the removable storage for the entire file type.

Users will expect your app to handle any file associations that you declare. Therefore, don't declare file associations that your app cannot handle responsibly. The file picker provides a robust UI mechanism that enables users to open files for use with an app. Declare the Removable Storage capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you cannot realize them by using the file picker. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    < Capability Name="removableStorage" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifShared User-Certificates

The Shared User-Certificates capability enables an app to access software and hardware certificates, such as certificates that are stored on a smart card for validating a user’s identity. This capability is typically used for financial or enterprise apps that require a smart card for authentication. When this capability is invoked at runtime, the user must act to insert a card, choose a certificate, and so forth. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" sharedUserCertificates" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifVideos Library

The Videos Library capability provides programmatic access to the user's Videos library, allowing the app to enumerate and access all files in the library without user interaction. This capability is typically used in movie playback apps that need access to the entire Videos library.

The file picker provides a robust UI mechanism that enables users to open files for use with an app. Declare the Videos Library capability only when the scenarios for your app require programmatic access, and you can’t realize them by using the file picker. For more information about how to record video, see How to record audio or video. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    <Capability Name=" videosLibrary" />
  </Capabilities>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifWebcam

The webcam capability provides access to the webcam’s video feed, which allows the app to capture snapshots and movies from a connected webcam. This capability is typically used in video chat or conferencing apps. Apps must handle the case where the user has disabled the webcam from the Settings charm. For more information about how to record video, see How to record audio or video.

The Webcam capability grants access only to the video stream. To grant access to the audio stream also, the Microphone capability must be added. The capability is written in the AppxManifest.xml file as the following code shows:

  <Capabilities>
    < DeviceCapability Name="webcam" />
  </Capabilities>

Use this page to extend or customize standard Windows features for use in your Windows store apps. For example, an app can declare that it handles files that have certain file extensions. For an overview of declarations, see App contracts and extensions.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifAvailable Declarations

Lists a declaration that the app can support. Click the Add button to add the declaration to the list of Supported Declarations.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifDescription

Describes the currently selected declaration.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifSupported Declarations

Lists the current declarations. Click the Remove button of a declaration to remove it from the list.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifProperties

Lists and sets the properties associated with the currently selected declaration. For more information, see App contracts and extensions. The list of properties depends on the declaration. These three properties are always listed for app contracts:

  • Executable . The default executable for the extension. If this property is specified, the EntryPoint property is also used. If the executable property isn't specified, the executable that's defined for the app is used. If the EntryPoint property isn't specified, the EntryPoint that's defined for the app is used.

  • Entry point . A string that identifies the object that handles the extension.

  • Start page . The web page that handles the extension.

The following declarations appear in the list of Available Declarations.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifAccount Picture Provider

When users decide to change their account picture, they can either select an existing picture or use an app to take a new one. If your app can take pictures, you can use this extension to have Windows list your app in the Account Picture Settings control panel. From there, users can select it to create a new account picture. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifAutoPlay Content

When the user connects a device to a computer, Windows fires an AutoPlay event. This extension enables your app to be listed as an AutoPlay choice for the one or more AutoPlay events.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifAutoPlay Device

Registers the app for Device events, such as attaching a camera. Multiple instances of this declaration are allowed in each app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifBackground Tasks

Apps can use background tasks to run app code even when the app is suspended. Background tasks are intended for small work items that require no interaction with the user. Multiple instances of this declaration are allowed in each app. The following code is from the Background Task sample.

      <Extensions>
        <Extension Category="windows.backgroundTasks" EntryPoint="Tasks.SampleBackgroundTask">
          <BackgroundTasks>
            <Task Type="systemEvent" />
            <Task Type="timer" />
          </BackgroundTasks>
        </Extension>
        <Extension Category="windows.backgroundTasks" EntryPoint="Tasks.ServicingComplete">
          <BackgroundTasks>
            <Task Type="systemEvent" />
          </BackgroundTasks>
        </Extension>
      </Extensions>

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifCached File Updater

You can provide updates for particular files to help users who want to use your app as a central repository to track and maintain files. For example, Microsoft SkyDrive can track a file to ensure that the user sees the latest version of the file and trigger updates to the file if the SkyDrive app can provide a newer version. Additionally, if the user saves a newer version of a tracked file, SkyDrive can trigger an update to its version of the file to ensure that SkyDrive always has the newest version. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app. For more information about the file picker, see Quickstart: Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps) and Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifCamera Settings

Your app can provide a custom user interface for selecting camera options and choosing effects when a camera is used to capture photos or video. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifCertificates

Digital certificates are used to authenticate one entity to another. For example, certificates are often used to authenticate a user to web services over SSL. This extension enables you to install a digital certificate with your app. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifContact Picker

This extension enables your app to register to provide contact data. Your app is included in the list of apps that Windows displays whenever the user needs access to their contacts.Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifFile Open Picker

Registers the app as a file open picker, making the content in the app available to other Windows 8apps. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app. For more information about the file picker, see Quickstart: Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps) and Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifFile Save Picker

Registers the app as a file save picker, making the app an available save location for other Windows 8 apps. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app. For more information about the file picker, see Quickstart: Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps) and Integrating with file picker contracts (Windows Store apps).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifFile Type Associations

Registers file type associations, such as .jpeg, on behalf of the app. Multiple instances of this declaration are allowed in each app. For more information, see How to handle file activation (Windows Store apps using JavaScript and HTML) (Windows), How to handle file activation (Windows Store apps using C#/VB/C++ and XAML) (Windows), and Guidelines and checklist for file types and URIs (Windows Store apps) (Windows).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifGame Explorer

Your app can register with the Windows Parental Control system as a game. To do this, you must create a Game Definition File (GDF), build it as a binary resource in your app, and declare that resource in the package manifest. The GDF contains metadata about the game, such as the game’s rating in the PEGI, ESRB, or other regional rating systems. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

When you provide a GDF file for your game, Windows can limit access to the game when the user has enabled family safety features.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPrint Task Settings

You can design an app that displays a custom print-related user interface and communicates directly with a print device. When you highlight the features that are specific to a particular make and model of print device, you can provide a richer, more enhanced user experience.Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifProtocol

Your app can use existing URI schemes for communication, such as mailto, or you can create a custom URI scheme. If you use this declaration, your app can register itself as a pluggable protocol handler that's associated with the name of a specified URI scheme. You can declare more than one URI scheme for each app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifSearch

You can add a search pane to your app so users can search not only your app's content but content from other apps as well. Users can also transfer the search query itself to other apps. When you participate in this contract, you agree to make your app's content searchable by other participants and to present search results from those participants in your app. Participating in this contract helps you gain traffic and usage for your app. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifShare Target

You can help users share content from your app with another app or service, and vice versa. Participating in the Share contract means that you don't have to write extra code or provide other developers with an SDK for your app just to share content. Apps that support the Share contract can automatically share content to and from any other app that also supports the contract. Participating in this contract helps you gain traffic and usage for your app. Only one instance of this declaration is allowed per app.

Use this page to configure URIs that have access to web standards for geolocation and Clipboard access. To use geolocation, you must also declare that app capability in the package manifest. URIs can include wildcard characters in subdomain names (for example, http://*.microsoft.com). This page appears only if the app is a Windows Store app that was built by using JavaScript.

For more information, see How to link to external web pages (Windows Store apps using JavaScript and HTML) (Windows) and Features and restrictions by context (Windows Store apps using JavaScript and HTML) (Windows).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifURI

The URI that your app can or can’t access.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifRule

Specify whether to include or exclude the URI.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifAdd new URI

Opens a new text box for adding another URI to the list.

Specifies a unique identity for the package, including name, version, and publisher information. For more information, see Naming your app (Windows) and Identity (Windows).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPackage Name

Required. Specifies the unique name that identifies the package on the system. When the package is uploaded to the Store, this name is replaced. The Package Name is case-sensitive. Use the Package Display Name to display a package name to users. This string must not end with a period and must not be one of these strings: "CON", "PRN", "AUX", "NUL", "COM1", "COM2", "COM3", "COM4", "COM5", "COM6", "COM7", "COM8", "COM9", "LPT1", "LPT2", "LPT3", "LPT4", "LPT5", "LPT6", "LPT7", "LPT8", and "LPT9".

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPackage Display Name

Specifies the friendly app name that appears in the Store. When the package is uploaded to the Store, this name is replaced.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifLogo

Specifies the image that appears on the Store description page for the product.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifVersion

Required. A version string expressed in quad notation, Major.Minor.Build.Revision.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPublisher

Required. Specifies the subject field of the signing certificate that's used to authenticate the package. When the package is uploaded to the Store, this name is replaced. For more information, see Signing an app package (Windows Store apps).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifChoose Certificate

Opens a dialog box so that you can choose or create a certificate. For more information, see Signing an app package (Windows Store apps).

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPublisher Display Name

Specifies the name that is used on the Publisher Name field on the developer portal website. When the package is uploaded to the Store, this name is replaced.

BR230259.collapse_all(en-us,VS.110).gifPackage Family Name

A unique name that identifies the package on the system and that comprises the package name and a hash of the publisher string.

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