Information
The topic you requested is included in another documentation set. For convenience, it's displayed below. Choose Switch to see the topic in its original location.

Control Authoring for Windows Forms

For control authors, the .NET Framework provides an unprecedented wealth of control authoring technology. Authors are no longer limited to designing user controls that act as a collection of preexisting controls. Now, through inheritance, authors can inherit from preexisting user controls, preexisting Windows Forms controls, or even design their own controls that execute custom painting. The new options available give an unprecedented level of flexibility to the design and functionality of the visual interface. To take advantage of these new features, you should be familiar with object-based programming concepts.

Visual Basic Note   It is not necessary to have a thorough understanding of inheritance, but you may find it useful to refer to Inheritance.

If you want to create custom controls to use on Web Forms, see Developing ASP.NET Server Controls.

In This Section

Walkthrough: Authoring a User Control With Visual Basic .NET
Demonstrates how to create a user control with Visual Basic.
Walkthrough: Authoring a User Control with Visual C#
Demonstrates how to create a user control with Visual C#.
Walkthrough: Inheriting from a Windows Forms Control with Visual Basic .NET
Demonstrates how to create a custom control that inherits from an existing Windows Form control in Visual Basic.
Walkthrough: Inheriting from a Windows Forms Control with Visual C#
Demonstrates how to create a custom control that inherits from an existing Windows Form control in Visual C#.
Control Type Recommendations
Provides guidance on inheriting from the UserControl class versus inheriting from the Control class versus inheriting from a Windows Forms control.
Authoring Controls for Windows Forms
Gives the high-level process for creating a custom control.
Authoring User Controls
Gives general information regarding the creation of user controls, control class libraries, and inheriting from user control in control class libraries.
Inheriting from the UserControl Class
Describes how to create user controls for Windows Forms by inheriting from the UserControl class.
Inheriting from the Control Class
Explains how to inherit from the Control class to create custom client controls that paint their own visual interface.
Inheriting from Existing Windows Forms Controls
Gives general information on inheriting from standard Windows Forms controls, such as Button or TextBox.
Properties, Methods, and Events for Custom Controls
Describes adding properties, methods, and events to custom controls.
Custom Control Painting and Rendering
Provides links to information about incorporating custom painting in your control.
Making Your Control Invisible at Run Time
Demonstrates how to hide a user control.
Aligning Your Control to the Edges of Forms
Demonstrates how to make your control align to the edge of the form it occupies.
Providing a Toolbox Bitmap for Your Control
Describes how to specify a toolbox bitmap for your control.
Extender Provider Objects
Gives an overview of extender objects, describes their general functionality, and gives tips on creating custom extenders.
Giving Your Control a Transparent Background
Demonstrates how to make your control transparent.
Displaying Your Control in the Customize Toolbox Dialog Box
Describes how to enable your control to be displayed in the Customize Toolbox dialog box.

Related Sections

What is the Common Language Specification?
Introduces the Common Language Runtime, which is designed to simplify the creation and use of components. An important aspect of this simplification is enhanced interoperability between components written using different programming languages. The Common Language Specification (CLS) makes it possible to create tools and components that work with multiple programming languages.
Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft